How To Garden For Goats: Gardening, Foraging, Small-Scale Grain and Hay, & More

Rated 5.00/5 based on 2 reviews
This little eBook discusses why feeding your goats from your garden is a good idea, what they can eat from the garden, preparation involved, foraging wild food, feeding canning leftovers and kitchen scraps, small scale grain and hay growing, stover, sprouting grain, hydroponic foddering, plus how to make your own vitamin and mineral More

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About Leigh Tate

Leigh Tate has always loved living close to the land. From the back-to-the-land movement to the modern homesteading movement, the agrarian lifestyle is the one she says feels like home. She and her husband currently homestead five acres in the foothills of the Southern Appalachians. Their vision is to become as self-sustaining as possible by stewarding their land, animals, and resources. Leigh's homesteading activities include gardening, food preservation, foraging, raising goats, chickens, and guinea fowl, herbs, cheese making, permaculture landscaping, spinning, weaving, knitting, sewing, quilting, natural dying, soapmaking, wood cookstove cookery, and renovating their old 1920s farmhouse.

Learn more about Leigh Tate
About the Series: The Little Series of Homestead How-Tos from 5 Acres & A Dream
From the author: When I published 5 Acres & A Dream The Book: The Challenges of Establishing a Self-Sufficient Homestead, I described it as neither a how-to nor a why-to book. Although it contains quite a bit of practical advice about many homesteading skills, it is mostly the story of our journey toward simpler, sustainable, more self-reliant living. The Little Series of Homestead How-Tos is a complement to that book. It is a work in progress which will eventually include all of the skills mentioned in 5 Acres & A Dream The Book, plus other how-tos as well. I hope they will encourage you, my readers, toward your own self-reliant lifestyles.

Also in Series: The Little Series of Homestead How-Tos from 5 Acres & A Dream

Also by This Author

Reviews

Farmer B reviewed on on March 28, 2015

I find that in the age of information, we often get hung up on one right way. When you read Leigh Tate's books, she gives you a much broader perspective because of the research she does. I have the desire to get away from the Industrial Era type of feeding for my animals because they have been produced for many more millennia than just the last 100 years and did just fine. We have to give our animals the best that we can and natural feeding is just that.

Keeping a library of these books is the kind of resource that I have come to depend on.
(reviewed the day of purchase)
Anna Hess reviewed on on March 27, 2015
(no rating)
I should start out by saying that I've had goats for all of 5.5 months now...but that doesn't make me as inexperienced as I sound. Whenever I start a new project, I read widely before diving in, so I've worked my way through Storey's Guide to Raising Dairy Goats, Raising Goats Naturally, Natural Goat Care, and The Goat Care Handbook, plus lots of websites on the topic. I also resolved from the beginning not to feed my goats grain, so have instead been keeping them healthy on a seasonally varying ration based on grazing, hay, foraging trips to honeysuckle patches and oat leaves, carrots, alfalfa pellets, and sunflower seeds, plus kelp and minerals.

Which is a long way of saying that this is the book I wished I'd had when I got started. Tate walks you through a widely varying array of potential feeds you can grow or collect for your goats, along with a list of what you really shouldn't be feeding to your herd. She included sections on sprouting grains and growing them all the way to "fodder" also, both options of which are both better for the health of your herd than the dried seeds if you must feed grain. Tate also offers advice on drying a wide range of weeds and herbs to make your own mineral mix, and even covers small-scale methods of harvesting hay.

Overall, while Tate's short book obviously isn't the be-all and end-all on the subject, it's an eye-opening edition that should be part of your goat-keeping library if you want to move away from simply scooping up some sweet feed for your caprines to dine on each morning.
(reviewed the day of purchase)
Paula Kanenberg reviewed on on March 27, 2015

Delightful! Full of great tips to make even the smallest home gardener proud. Interesting and informative. A must read to boost your knowledge on what to plant and harvest for your critters. Glad to have it in my library.
(reviewed the day of purchase)
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