Everyone Hates The English

It is human to be annoyed by certain aspects of life, by individuals or group of people. People habitually associate exhibited characteristics with specific people and for centuries the English have dissatisfied the most people across the globe. But as diverse as the reasons why Everyone Hates The English are, the world still respects and simply enjoy the English the most. These tales say as much. More

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Words: 77,450
Language: Commonwealth English
ISBN: 9781310467059
About Yas Niger

Yas Niger is a Nigerian writer and poet with progressively traditional views. A trained educationist, activist and social media commentator who writes fictional works on contemporary African and world issues, advocating civilized virtues. With a preference for simple poetry and unconventional literary prose, he writes in a removed assertive manner, reflecting on everyday secular relationships.

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Reviews

Review by: Hdprose, Sr on Aug. 19, 2015 : (no rating)
Yas Niger’s “the man in the moon” – the story of Leroy Freeborn

It is a fascinating tale of a culturally engaged street corner preacher, a usually misunderstood necessary oddity in major metropolises built upon colonial legacy - where the non indigenous culturally marginalized, some of them forcibly brought to build the same thing they, now, are blamed to have polluted. It is, a story said from its characters and supporting onlookers’ perspective, an insightful fiction.

The character development focused on three actors who kept on yanking the story into motion. It is like a pyramid standing on Leroy Freeborn - a self-anointed ambassador of a motley group that he himself reveals his estrangement from, depending on its state of affairs – as revealed by his following statement "… I much rather say I am black and proud, than I am a proud African …" Therefore, it is safe to say that Leroy’s sense of belonging, vis-à-vis Africa, is selective, although there is a dose of Garveyism in his preaching that all black people are from Africa. His consciousness, which was supposed to be the key to his inner peace, might very well be considered as the basis of his tragic state of being.

Then comes Mrs. Gregory, the essential story spinner – a provoker Leroy couldn’t live without, who summarizes the bad and the good, the two sides of the coin, of western civilization – the target of Leroy’s preaching; and then Henry, a dog given a humane characterization, a dog with a mind, caprices, and feeling; he too helped run the story to its destination. As much as they get along, there is a deep-seated love and hate. To me, it seems that Leroy loves Barbara but hates Mrs. Gregory. On his fateful day, he accepted Barbara’s invitation - as Leroy the man, but Mr. Freeborn got ambushed by Mrs. Gregory’ Caucasian embedded anxiety about black men’s motives.

I knew, and mingled with, some Leroy Freeborns; fascinating people to be with, While perching on their stage - under the bright sun, until it is time to get home, when the sea is done swallowing the sun and the moon' reminder that it is time now to have an inner preaching with one’s pillow, to say the least, or the time to cuddle and nurture love ones; and then you wonder whether they would prefer that the sun will never set on their day to day reality. He is the man in the moon, while standing on his pedestal, fading into the ghost of his shadow just a step down from his makeshift launching pad.

Diabel Faye
(reviewed 15 days after purchase)

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