The Flower Girl

Rated 1.00/5 based on 1 reviews
A family wedding should be a joyous occasion, but Elsie, the flower girl, has gone missing in a large garden dotted with multiple pools. Her frantic parents, who have spent the day avoiding one another, have four minutes in which to find her before it is too late...a short story in which the action, from start to end, happens over an equally short time period.
Download: epub mobi (Kindle) pdf more Online Reader
Words: 8,020
Language: English
ISBN: 9781311563682
About Irene Davidson

Irene Davidson is the writing pseudonym of Adrienne Oaks.
She has a Bachelor’s degree in Science (major in Botany) followed by two years post-graduate study in Landscape Architecture, one year in secondary teaching training and a year of psychology, social geography and design. She is taking a well-earned rest from further tertiary education for now.
Growing up in the far south of the far south of New Zealand, she soon noted that it was a very long way from ...anywhere. She started travelling as a secondary school exchange student to that ‘other’ south, …Tennessee, USA.
Post her post-graduate diploma, she flew to London, where she worked in several jobs, including Landscape Architect in a building overlooking Buckingham Palace’s gardens, before producing the first of two wonderful children. Her CV now consists of a curious mélange of academic achievements, places travelled and an unusual mix of workplaces ...she could also add several months of ‘Chateau cleaning’ in France to her résumé but feels it may reduce the tone somewhat.
She utilises the bountiful experiences she has garnered from all this travelling and working abroad in her writing.
Having returned to that ‘other’ south in 2016, after a year of living in Chattanooga, she has recently relocated to Washington State with her husband and their rescued ex-racing greyhound …who sleeps in Seattle while she writes.

Also by This Author

Readers of This Book Also Read

Reviews

Review by: Hobbe Noxious on July 14, 2015 :
Further proof that children can, and will, ruin everything.

Bland, lifeless storytelling. Excessive inclusion of uninteresting details in place of actual character development. Why are we, the readers, meant to care about this situation? The little girl, specifically, was a non-entity. Are we meant to care simply for the fact that she is a child? That's lazy storytelling, and completely ineffective in this case. I liked the concept of the ticking clock chapters, but that was about all.
(review of free book)

Report this book