Don't All Thank Me At Once: The Lost Pop Genius of Scott Miller

Brett Milano's finely tuned exploration of Game Theory/Loud Family founder Scott Miller's life and work sheds light on the late singer-songwriter's literate pop rock and sadly underappreciated talent. Included here are revealing interviews with nearly every member of his bands, and renowned collaborators like producer Mitch Easter, Posies member Ken Stringfellow and songwriter Aimee Mann. More

Available ebook formats: epub

Published by 125 Records
Words: 70,690
Language: English
ISBN: 9780692559680
About Brett Milano

Brett Milano published his first piece, a favorable review of the Ramones album End of the Century, in the western Massachusetts weekly the Valley Advocate in January 1980. He wrote for that paper until moving to Boston in the early '80s, and became a regular at Boston Rock magazine before getting his first byline in the city's major daily, the Boston Globe. Beginning with a Supertramp concert review, he made regular appearances in the Globe through the '80s, sometimes as often as five times a week. Here he wrote everything from interviews to locally-slanted features, and fondly remembers interviewing Joey Ramone and Barry Manilow in the same afternoon.
In the early '90s he spent three years in Los Angeles where he worked in publicity for the Rhino and Alias labels. At Rhino he compiled and annotated CD reissues by The Cars, Todd Rundgren, Lee Michaels and others. At Alias he was able to help get the Loud Family signed and was rewarded with a special thanks on their underground pop classic album, Plants & Birds & Rocks & Things.

He was website editor for Firefly, one of the first sites to use intelligent-agent technology in music and other referrals. Later he also worked for Harmonix Music, originator of the Guitar Hero and Rock Band games. Originally hired as website editor, he also became the lead researcher and content writer for The Beatles: Rock Band game.

Brett's first book, Vinyl Junkies: Adventures in Record Collecting looks at the phenomenon of record collecting through the lives and obsessions of the famous and not-famous folks who go to extreme lengths to track down those Holy Grails. As Smithereens leader Pat DiNizio writes in the foward, "There's no real defendable reason for this compulsion, this mania, this terrible malady. But in Vinyl Junkies, Brett Milano does seem to make sense of it all." This book was followed by 2007's The Sound Of Our Town: A History of Boston Rock & Roll which made big waves on the East Coast. He also contributed short stories to the rock & roll fiction anthologies, Tales From the House Band I & II (Plus One Press).

Most recently he made a temporary move to New Orleans where he was editor of the city's leading arts and culture magazine, OffBeat. He has been a commercial copywriter for a fashion retail site and for the content agency Cue Media. His third book, Don't All Thank Me At Once: The Lost Pop Genius of Scott Miller will be published by 125 Press in fall 2015.

Also by This Publisher

Reviews

This book has not yet been reviewed.
Report this book