Minor: Volume One

Adult
Rated 5.00/5 based on 1 reviews
Minor is the first of the journals that writer Meghan McDonnell has chronicled from age 8 to now - almost 30 years. Her candid musings on daily life and family, social and romantic relationships coalesce in a unique commentary on growing up, facing down passion and fear, and American life.
Volume 1 spans her 8th year through age 17: reflections on family, friends, school & survival camp. More
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About Meghan McDonnell

Meghan McDonnell lives in Walla Walla with the man she loves. When she’s not writing or reading, she spends time outdoors, solves crossword puzzles, and pretends to garden.

About the Series: The Journals of Meghan McDonnell
For over 20 years, writer Meghan McDonnell has chronicled her life in her personal journals beginning at age eight through present day. With searing candor and tenderness, her musings on daily life and observations of family, social and romantic relationships coalesce in a commentary on challenges, facing down passion and fear, and American life in the 21st century. Wide in scope and vivid in detail, her journals are her confessional love letter to the world. Join her on a fearless, vulnerable, sometimes painful and quixotic, but always honest journey, also known as the human experience.

Also in Series: The Journals of Meghan McDonnell

Also by This Author

Reviews

Charity Rowell reviewed on on April 11, 2016

Beginning in 1987 and chronicling her life until 1997, McDonnell reveals her innermost thoughts and secrets; a fact that cannot be ignored as the formatting in Minor is similar to what you would find in a diary, or journal.

The formatting of Minor is definitely unique, and it reminds readers that they are reading an uncensored and candid re-telling of a person's life. There are a few grammatical errors, but these minor errors lend an air of authenticity to the book which serves to remind readers that McDonnell's reflections are transcribed from her earlier days.

Readers are guided through a collage of memories that discuss lost friendships, new friendships, crushes, life-defining music, drama at home and in school, unrequited love, travelling, books, and teenage angst punctuated by periods of alcohol and drug use as McDonnell shares her perspective on life as a girl and teenager.

There were moments when I smiled at some of the colloquialisms used and the music references, because I remember what those words used to mean and I remember listening to the same songs. I empathized with the young McDonnell when she struggled to figure out where she fit in society, or the world because I remember feeling the same at that age.

I could not relate to some of the moments in her life because I grew up in a different kind of household. However, it is nice to know that some aspects of being a teenage girl are universal; even if our teenage selves would have rolled our eyes at the prospect, and remained convinced that nobody could even come close to understanding us.

Minor may not be a polished memoir; however, it is sincere, honest, and real.
(review of free book)
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