The Devil and Jimmy Biscuits

Rated 4.75/5 based on 4 reviews
Fifteen year old James Pearson wants three wishes in exchange for his soul, and hasn’t traveled all the way to Hell to take no for an answer. Can Lucifer talk sense into the boy, or is Jimmy going to learn things the hard way?
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About Taylor Dunn

Taylor Dunn is the pen name of an American born author raised in the charming and underrated city of Minneapolis, Minnesota. There, a poor white kid growing up in a poor black world, he learned many of life’s lessons the hard way. Drawing on those experiences has led to the creation of unusual characters with, demented and deranged as they may be, a distinct voice.

Escaping the poverty of the North Side, he attended Augsburg College and later Saint Cloud State University where he studied history, with a particular interest in Eastern Europe and Asia, discovering how poor people of other cultures were slowly crushed by structural inequality and oppression. Not that we know anything about that in the United States.

Before publishing his first novel Taylor worked as a yard-dog for a company known by its employees as the dog-nut. He moved on to stints as a courier, truck driver, bartender, a teacher of little kids, and later a teacher of bigger little kids. When not being tormented by the scheming intrigues of demons, Taylor enjoys traveling, mountaineering, and the unpredictability of people. He invites readers to email him at taylor.dunn.author@gmail.com.

“I don’t care if you are good or bad; just be interesting.”
- Taylor Dunn

Also by This Author

Reviews

Review by: Melanie Surani on July 31, 2018 :
Jimmy is a 15 year with some demands for the Devil (wishes, to be specific). As you might expect, ol’ Satan had his own ideas.

This story is an easy, quick read that left me smiling the whole way through. It has moments of humor, thoughtfulness, and because we’re dealing with a character as basal as Satan, it challenges ingrained ideas.

“I’m not sure you fully understand the implications of the proposition," Lucifer replied slowly. "Your soul, the part of you that lasts forever, in exchange for three wishes. Wishes that I presume will benefit your temporal personage?”
Jimmy stared with a perplexed expression.
“Your earthly body, genius.”
“Oh,” Jimmy said brightly. “Yeah, exactly.”
“Go home kid,” Satan said, “before you get hurt.”

Lucifer is powerful, able to grant a wish, and already suggesting said wish will not be chosen well. The “Go home” suggests maybe he’s not as big a dick as culture portrays.

Thinking Satan isn’t a dick goes against everything I learned as a lifelong Christian. Instead, I should wish him to sit on a tack (ouch!), not be afraid of him, and most of all: never, ever mess with him (this means not entertaining witches like Harry Potter, not hugging trees like those nature-worshiping faeries in Fern Gully, and not acknowledging someone else has power, like that hussy Synergy on Jem and the Holograms).

The nice thing about being an adult and letting a piece of fiction be a piece of fiction is that I can read about someone who’s supposed to be my enemy and see the good in them. Or at least be curious about who they are.

But as great as the main characters are in this story, the supporting cast is just as good. Mig, I love you.

This short story is funny, it challenges ideas we already have, but also conforms to the idea that people get what’s coming to them. I mean, you don’t expect a story about Satan to be completely above board, do you?

Taylor Dunn is also the author of another short story called Fear and Loathing in Shanghai, which I beta read, but haven’t read the finished product. Also available is a full-length novel (also featuring Lucifer) called Clockwork Angels (which I beta read as well, and it’s one of my favorites). If these works are anything to go by, this author will be entertaining us for a long time.
(reviewed 9 days after purchase)
Review by: Sarah Jones on Feb. 3, 2016 :
Terrific blend of humor and excellent writing.
(review of free book)
Review by: Solomon Archer on Jan. 21, 2016 :
A wonderful twist on the classic Faustian tale. Witty, fun and compelling, a terrific short story that made me laugh out loud.
(review of free book)
Review by: Bobb B on Jan. 10, 2016 :
One of my favorites, as good a story as can be penned by a human.
(review of free book)
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