Problem Child: The View From The Principal's Office

Rated 4.00/5 based on 1 reviews
Short humorous stories of Robb, the hyperactive boy who had his own reserved-seating desk in the principal's office. Following him around, we learn why school is NOT like the game show Jeopardy!, and why trying to sneak a peek at a nude sunbather can be hazardous to your health. More

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About Robb Lightfoot

Robb has enjoyed writing and performing since he was a child, and many of his earliest performances earned him a special recognition-reserved seating in the principal's office at Highland Elementary. His weekly humor column "Or So it Seems™" has been featured in A News Cafe, and his news stories and feature pieces have appeared in The Bakersfield Californian. He's been on stage as an opening stand-up act in Reno, and his writing has been published in the Funny Times. His short stories have won honorable mention in national competitions and his screenplay, "One Little Indian," was a top-ten finalist in a national contest conducted by The Writer's Digest magazine.

Robb is a tenured, full-time communications instructor, and he presently lives, writes and teaches in Northern California. You can contact him in several ways:

530-636-0550 - cell

Robb@robblightfoot.com

www.thinkingfunny.com

www.orsoitseems.com

@robblightfoot - Twitter

PO Box 214
Palo Cedro, CA 96073

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Reviews

Review by: boredandblue2 on June 7, 2016 :
Robb Lightfoot shares stories from his own childhood as a hyperactive boy trying to make sense out of a world which has little patience for him. Young Robb inability to decipher pretty much any of the social cues children are expected to understand combined with his boundless energy lead to some very funny experiences. His description of a boy trying to capture bees in a jar is dead on. The adults surrounding young Robb are of little help. His father is impatient, his mother’s accepting, and his teachers are clueless.
Occasionally the tales feel exaggerated for the sake of humor, which is too bad because reality is more touching. In addition, the author only shares humorous stories. A few poignant or sad memories would give a more rounded view of Robb’s childhood troubles.
This book should be required reading for elementary school teachers. It gives a clear look in to young boy’s thought processes.
I want to thank the author for giving me the opportunity to read this book. Disclaimer: The author gave me an advanced copy in exchange for this review.
(reviewed 39 days after purchase)
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