Comments on Daniel Novotny’s Book (2013) Ens Rationis from Suarez to Caramuel

This 14,800 word essay comments on Daniel Novotny’s study in scholasticism of the Baroque Era. The category-based nested form is used to model arguments about beings of reason (by Suarez, Hurtado, Mastri, Belluto and Caramuel). Implicit and explicit abstraction are modeled along the way. More

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About the Series: A Course on Implicit and Explicit Abstraction
This course opens the door to postmodern scholasticism. The Baroque scholastics (1600 to 1680AD) lived in Spain at the same time that Galileo, Descartes, and others founded the current Age of Ideas. Forgotten for 300 years, the Baroque scholastics re-emerge today. Postmodern thought significantly overlaps with concerns of the Baroque scholastics. What is a mind-dependent being? What is abstraction? What is a sign? These are all covered in this course. Two books by philosophers are covered, one by Daniel Novotny and the other by John Deely. These may be purchased separately. Student instructions are in the commentaries. Start with Novotny and commentary, proceed to primer #11, then finish with Deely and commentary.

Also in Series: A Course on Implicit and Explicit Abstraction

About the Series: Considerations of Jacques Maritain, John Deely and Thomistic Approaches to the Questions of These Times
Two models are used to appreciate the tendrils stretching from the present day into the oft forgotten Baroque and earlier scholastics of Christendom. These models are the triadic structure of judgment and the category-based nested form.

Two recent thinkers stand out.

One is Jacques Maritain, originally born in France. He came to Northern America around the time of the second world war. He is keenly interested in how to recover a scholastic approach within this world of modern science.

Another is John Deely, whose recent death marks the end of a long career as both a Thomist and a semiotician. Deely also confronted the philosophers of the day. He did so in a very entertaining manner.

Also, within this series, many articles from journals such as the American Catholic Philosophical Association, Faith and Philosophy, and others are commented upon, as well as Daniel Novotny excellent works on the Baroque scholastics.

This series is not a course, but a place to sample ideas. I encourage readers to consider both the original and these comments. They may be read in tandem or in sequence.

Also in Series: Considerations of Jacques Maritain, John Deely and Thomistic Approaches to the Questions of These Times

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