On a Winter's Eve

Rated 4.00/5 based on 2 reviews
No one knew where they came from - a parallel world, another dimension, the Abyss? They had preyed on the inhabitants of a remote area for decades, sometimes wiping out entire families, their numbers seeming augmented each time they returned, which was always during the coldest winter storms. But when they came this time - they picked the wrong cabin... More
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About Chris L. Adams

Chris spent years playing guitar in and out of bands and was, during that time, more of a voracious reader than a writer. After that last band collapsed, he turned from writing songs to writing stories, eventually turning out a half million-word Barsoom series as a tribute to Edgar Rice Burroughs (currently under contract to ERB Inc.) and a host of self-published short stories and poems.

Something inside drives him to create, and so together with writing and playing guitar, he also dabbles in painting (the cover for his novel, The Hunter and the Sorcerer, is one of his).

You may find him on his website, www.ChrisLAdamsBizarreTales.com. There, you'll find links, information on available stories, and other things you might find of interest.

Chris enjoys talking about favorite authors, writing and collecting books so feel free to shoot him an email from his Contact page.

Chris resides in Southern West Virginia with his wife and two children.

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Reviews

James Hold reviewed on May 18, 2018

One tends not to think of HPL and REH in the same sentence but the two did carry on an extensive correspondence and REH did write some creepy enuf tales when he could find a market for them. This story adequately adopts that Lovecraft-with-muscle style while hanging on to certain mannerisms exclusive to the master.
(review of free book)
Gilbert M. Stack reviewed on April 25, 2018

This short story is flat out creepy. In it Adams consciously adopts the style of the pulp writers of the 1930s and 1940s and is so successful that you wouldn’t be surprised to learn this was a lost work of H.P. Lovecraft. The tension builds slowly as the other-worldly threat first makes itself known and then begins its haunting attacks on a family living far from civilization in wooded, snow-covered mountain lands. Since the story is told from a first person perspective years after the event, you know the narrator is going to survive, but it doesn’t feel that way as the danger mounts and the body count expands. This one will linger with you and give you second thoughts about looking out the window to watch the snow.
(review of free book)
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