Bloom

Rated 5.00/5 based on 1 reviews
A chance glimpse of a flower drives Simon on a hunt to possess the rare bloom. It's a flower whose beauty lies in the willpower of the owner. Is just having it, enough? More
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About Lee A Jackson

The Beginning: I began writing in my mid to late teens, sequestered away in my bedroom in rural south west England. The writing was borne out of a need to express myself and to communicate with the world, something I was not good at doing verbally. It became an outlet for me and my writing grew with me through the years.

The Middle: The writing stuck with me, and the style and nature of my writing naturally evolved as my life changed. Longer stories started coming along, and I even went through a period of planning and organising stories out before actually writing anything. That flew in the face of the disorganised nature where I would just write everything in one go from a single thought such as a title or a name. Still through a lack of self belief, everything was kept close to my chest. That and habitual procrastination.

The End: There will be no end, not until the sun dies its death. For the longest time I had a fear of being forgotten and the way I figured to combat that would be to have a published book sat on a library shelf somewhere. I would have indelibly left my mark somewhere, long after I passed. That was a motivation in the back of my subconscious mind somewhere and still to this day, the enduring nature of my words in print following my end, is comforting.

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Reviews

Caroline Wood reviewed on May 27, 2017

Like all good stories, this short piece works on different levels. There's a fable or fairytale quality to the idea of discovering something much desired, and which carries a high price for ownership.

At another level, the story made me think of the must-have-at-any-cost consumerism we accept as normality. And the blind willingness to destroy what we need. Perhaps I'm reading too far beyond the surface of the story, but I felt it portrayed human greed in a chilling way.
(review of free book)
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