Wardens in Shackles: Wildlife Conservation in India - 2

This book is a call to decentralise wildlife management in the country. Former Chief Wild Life Warden of Madhya Pradesh, provides an insider’s account of how Central agencies put road blocks in the ways of the states interested in proactive conservation action. The book shows that without dogged pursuit, and some madness, nothing worthwhile can be done to conserve wildlife in India. More

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About Harbhajan Singh Pabla

Dr. Harbhajan Singh Pabla grew up in a Punjabi village in India. He joined the Indian Forest Service in 1977 and retired as the Chief Wildlife Warden of the state of Madhya Pradesh in February 2012. Apart from doing the usual things that an Indian forester does, he nurtured his love for the wilds while managing national parks like Kanha, Panna and Bandhavgarh. Along the way, he developed a penchant for questioning the status quo and challenged the stereotypes that have ruled the conservation mindset in the country. He introduced the concept of “conservation by incentive” in the form of a cash reward to farmers for hosting an endangered bird, the lesser florican, in their croplands. He was responsible for changing the face of wildlife tourism in Madhya Pradesh, despite opposition from NTCA, and made tourism revenue a significant resource in tiger reserves of the state. When Panna lost all its tigers, he developed and implemented the tiger reintroduction plan that has given the world the confidence that wild tigers will always be around. He was the principal force behind the reintroduction of gaur in Bandhavgarh and blackbuck in Kanha, after both the species had become locally extinct in the nineties. His unfinished agenda for the state included the reintroduction of barasingha in the Forsyth country, i.e. the Satpura Tiger Reserve, and the white tiger in its native Sanjay Tiger Reserve. Barasingha has already reached Bori in Satpura, and he hopes to see white tigers in the wild before saying adieu to this world. He unsuccessfully tried to introduce community-based sport-hunting for the conservation of crop raiding species. His wish-list for conservation also includes seeing Indian foresters riding horses for patrolling and enjoying the wilderness.
Apart from a stint on the faculty of the Wildlife Institute of India, he has been an international consultant in wildlife management.
He is an ardent tennis player and lives in Bhopal, India.

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