Prostate Cancer Guide

The Things Your Doctor Probably Won’t Tell You & How to Deal with Them

by: Merlin Sprague

Copyright 2012 by Merlin Sprague

Smashwords Edition, License Notes

This ebook is licensed for your personal enjoyment only. This ebook may not be re-sold or given away to other people. If you would like to share this book with another person, please purchase an additional copy for each person you share it with. If you’re reading this book and did not purchase it, or it was not purchased for your use only, then you should return to Smashwords.com and purchase your own copy. Thank you for respecting the hard work of this author.

AUTHOR’S NOTES

This book is for men. I wrote this book as though a bunch of old, close friends were gathered up at the hunting lodge on a chill and starry night. It’s late and a thin wind is whistling through the cracks and crannies. The air is redolent of grilled steaks, fine tobacco and Hoppe’s NO 9, all accompanied by ice clinking on glass. The mood is like that in an Indian sweat lodge where the soul is bared and one’s deepest thoughts rise to the surface.

The old boys are sitting, staring into the low fire when one begins to speak. It’s time, he feels, to let down his hair and talk to his friends of a life-changing experience. He wants to share with them the things he’s learnt about a feared cancer. He wants to help prepare them for a trial they too may undergo. He pulls no punches.

As with men in such circumstances, the language in this book is direct and often abrupt – a hallmark of red-blooded, hairy-chested bravado and masculine camaraderie. It’s the kind of language that puts men at ease. Women wouldn’t appreciate it. But then, this book isn’t written for women.

This book is short. With a fresh cancer diagnosis, you know that time is of the essence. Consequently, you don’t have time to plow through some ponderous 700-page book; you should be able to polish this one off in an evening.

The field of medicine is filled with jargon. When I use an obscure medical term for the first time, I’ll put the definition in either a footnote or an endnote, depending on your reading device. After that, I’ll use the term or its acronym.

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