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Environmental Issues: Mankind's Relentless March to Oblivion

Jon Van Loon

Copyright 2012 Jon Van Loon

Smashwords Edition

Dedication

To those citizens of the world who have worked to have enacted long term solutions to the problems that could have helped prevent man’s now unstoppable march to oblivion.

Preface

If you have been lulled into a false sense of security after reading the book 'Abundance', and you believe that all the world's problems will be taken care of mainly through a flood of new technology, then you may not want to read this book. Yet If you really seek the truth about the future of mankind and long term bio-sustainability of this planet for future generations then this book is truly a must read.

I have spent my life working in the field of environmental science, and my wide ranging world wide experience suggests much more complex problems in enacting solutions are now upon us and worse will be faced in the future. Material presented in this treatise will demonstrate why overpopulation coupled with practical and deeply ingrained inertia spawning obstacles will prevent abundance even born of technological genius from becoming practical solutions to the growing worldwide grave problems.

Introduction

Inventing revolutionary technology especially at exponential rates is just the first and often the easiest step in an overall glacial speed multistep process that ends in a practical solution to a world problem. Within a single industry adoption of in-house inventions or otherwise acquired revolutionary technology can be relatively straight forward and relatively quickly enacted. However when such a technology is meant to have application over widespread jurisdiction(s) many complex factors come into play. At worse these often negate the practical implementation of the technology. At best they cause unacceptable long time delaying impediments to its adoption. So we can produce new technologies at exponential rates but governments and people still implement change at an almost imperceptible pace.

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