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Vivitar Solid Glass Mirror Lenses

Published by David V. Barth at Smashwords

Copyright 2012 by David V. Barth

Discover other titles by David V. Barth at Smashwords.com

Smashwords Edition, License Notes
This ebook is licensed for your personal enjoyment only. This ebook may not be re-sold or given away to other people. If you would like to share this book with another person, please purchase an additional copy for each recipient. If you're reading this book and did not purchase it, or it was not purchased for your use only, then please return to Smashwords.com and purchase your own copy. Thank you for respecting the hard work of this author.

Table of Contents

Chapter 1: Preface
Chapter 2: What is the focal length of a lens?
Chapter 3: What is a "normal" lens?
Chapter 4: What is a portrait lens
Chapter 5: What is a telephoto lens?
Chapter 6: How long can telephoto lenses get?
Chapter 7: From 6-foot, plus, telephotos to shorter, mirror lenses
Chapter 8: Mirror lenses are delicate instruments
Chapter 9: Vivitar's 800mm, 5-inch long solid cat lens
Chapter 10: Discover other titles by David V. Barth at Smashwords.com
Chapter 11: About the Author

Chapter 1: Preface

This is an essay about telephoto mirror lenses that use solid glass instead of thin glass reflectors. The discussion will apply to cameras that are designed to use film that is 35mm in size, digital cameras that have an effective sensor size of 35mm, and cameras that can accommodate interchangeable lenses.

In the early years of digital, between 2000 and 2015, most digital cameras had sensors that were smaller than 35mm simply due to the high cost of producing sensors of that size. By the late 2000s, high-end digital cameras had sensors that approximated 35mm film in size, but they cost upwards of $5,000. By 2015, prices had (or will) come down due to economy of scale as production of 35mm equivalent sensors ramps up, and fewer larger, "professional" cameras use smaller sensors. However, small point-and-shoot cameras and cellular phone cameras will continue to use smaller sensors to allow for compact design.

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