Interview with B Thorn

What is your writing process?
I note down ideas as they come to me. (Sometimes I seek them out, if I have a rough idea where I want to go.) Eventually some of them will mature enough that I see potential for a story. Then I'll jot down an outline for the story and start writing. Usually I work from start to finish rather than jumping around, because otherwise there's a temptation to write all the fun bits first, and then I have no motivation to finish the rest.
I'm one of those disobedient authors who edit as they go. Maybe I'd finish stuff faster if I made myself complete a rough draft before attempting to polish, but I just can't bring myself to do it; every time I come back to a story in progress, I go over what I've just written and see if I can improve it.
Describe your desk
Cluttered.
When did you first start writing?
My first grade teacher encouraged us all to write. I hated the physical act of writing, because my handwriting is slow and ugly, but I've always enjoyed telling stories. Once I discovered typing I never looked back!
What's the story behind your latest book?
I originally wrote a short story as a gift for my girlfriend, a tale about an impulsive physical encounter between two women at a business party. Then I wondered: what happens afterwards? What are the consequences?
What inspires you to get out of bed each day?
The corgi who wants his breakfast NOW NOW NOW.
Which authors have most influenced your writing, and how?
First pick: W. Somerset Maugham. I'm fascinated by human flaws and weaknesses; he's not exactly the only writer who studies those themes, but he approaches them with a warmth and compassion that I don't often encounter. It's easy to write a villain and make the audience wish they were dead; Maugham reminds me that nobody sees themselves as a villain, and that everybody is a mix of better and worse traits. I try to reflect that in my own writing.

Jane Austen is another one who's important to me. I had to study a couple of her works in high school, and they seemed superficial and dull until my mother sat down with me and put them into context: these aren't stories about idle women who have nothing better to think about than husbands, they're about women who risk being destitute if they don't marry - and about the dilemmas and moral compromises that result. Would you sleep with somebody you didn't respect if it was the only way to put food on the table? Because under the polite veneer, that's a big part of what these stories are about. From Jane Austen I learned that what people are saying and what they're really communicating can be two hugely different things.
What is the greatest joy of writing for you?
Why give just one answer when three will do?

There's an odd sort of intimacy in writing: reaching out and putting thoughts into somebody's brain, somebody on the other side of the world who I've never met and never will. I sometimes describe it as "one of only two jobs where you get to make complete strangers cry and not feel guilty about it." (Though not as well-paid as the other one, alas...)

It's also part of the bond between me and my partner. When I finish a story, I'll give it to her to read, and she'll tell me what works and what doesn't. It's because she's willing to criticise my work that I know I can trust her when she says it's good.

Last but not least, even if nobody else reads it, creation is satisfying. Ideas are two a penny; turning them into a complete story is where it turns into hard work. But typing the last word and looking back at a completed story gives me a tremendous sense of accomplishment.
Published 2013-10-31.
Smashwords Interviews are created by the profiled author, publisher or reader.

Books by This Author

The Riddle of the Copper Coin
Price: $2.99 USD. Words: 16,680. Language: Australian English. Published: March 5, 2016. Categories: Fiction » Fantasy » General, Fiction » Gay & lesbian fiction
Penny sinks into depression after breaking her ankle and losing her girlfriend. Her housemate Rafi comforts her by telling a story inspired by the 1001 Nights. Rafi narrates the adventures of Adiba, an Arabian heroine who sets out to rescue a kidnapped princess from the City of Jinn armed only with her wits and a pen. As the rescue becomes a courtship, so does Rafi's story-telling.
The Wasp of St. Judith's
You set the price! Words: 6,960. Language: American English. Published: February 15, 2015. Categories: Fiction » Horror » Weird fiction
The night-shift nurse on a dementia ward discovers the price of an old musician's talent. But is the bargain complete? Weird horror, 6800 words.
Magnum Innominandum
You set the price! Words: 16,010. Language: American English. Published: February 8, 2014. Categories: Fiction » Horror » Weird fiction, Fiction » Gay & lesbian fiction » Lesbian
In 1923, Boston heiress Josephine befriends Ruth, a clergyman's daughter. Their friendship turns deadly as the two of them are drawn into the mysteries of a secretive and dangerous cult. A modern "weird tale" in the tradition of Robert Chambers' "The King in Yellow".
A Stringed Instrument
Price: $4.99 USD. Words: 86,350. Language: Australian English. Published: October 26, 2013. Categories: Fiction » Gay & lesbian fiction » Lesbian, Fiction » Romance » Contemporary
Sleeping with your boss's daughter at the office Christmas party - what could possibly go wrong? When Yvonne meets Phoebe physical attraction comes easily, but she's unprepared for the trials of a closeted relationship with a "straight" woman from a conservative family. The consequences are sometimes funny, sometimes sad, often steamy, and always touching.
A Stringed Instrument (18+)
Price: $4.99 USD. Words: 99,250. Language: Australian English. Published: October 26, 2013. Categories: Fiction » Gay & lesbian fiction » Lesbian, Fiction » Erotica » Lesbian Erotica
(5.00)
Sleeping with your boss's daughter at the office Christmas party - what could possibly go wrong? When Yvonne meets Phoebe, physical attraction comes easily, but she's unprepared for the trials of a closeted relationship with a "straight" woman from a conservative family. The consequences are sometimes funny, sometimes sad, often steamy, and always touching.