Interview with David Kubicek

Do you remember the first story you ever wrote?
When I was in middle school I wrote a series of humorous stories about Baron Von Hindenburg, who lived in a big old house in Transylvania. He was a nervous fellow and probably shouldn't have been living in a region with such a reputation for its macabre happenings. Each story dealt with the Baron being confronted by a new problem with a werewolf, vampire, or dead body, etc., and his unique solution to that challenge. It's a wonder the poor guy didn't have a heart attack from all the creepy goings on.
What is your writing process?
I'm a "pantser." I do a little planning so I know where the story is going, then I just write and revise and cut and polish. I try to follow Elmore Leonard's basic rule of writing: "I try to leave out the parts that people skip." Oh, and I must have coffee.
Do you remember the first story you ever read, and the impact it had on you?
Ray Bradbury's MARTIAN CHRONICLES wasn't the first fiction that I read, but it was the book that made me decide to become a professional writer. I was in awe of Bradbury's narrative power, which made his version of Mars come alive, and I wanted to write stories like that.
How do you approach cover design?
My main concern is that the cover have some connection to the heart of the book.
What do you read for pleasure?
I have wide-ranging tastes in fiction. I have a special love for good science fiction because that is the genre on which I cut my reading and writing teeth, but I also read contemporary, historical, mysteries, and fantasy.
What is your e-reading device of choice?
Primarily my Kindle, but I also have a Nook.
Where did you grow up, and how did this influence your writing?
I grew up in Lincoln, Nebraska, although I have rural and small town roots on both my father's and mother's sides of the family. The first book I published was an anthology of short stories by various writers (including myself) about rural life. It was called THE PELICAN IN THE DESERT AND OTHER STORIES OF THE FAMILY FARM. Since I have always lived in the city, however, most of my stories tend to have an urban flavor. My novel IN HUMAN FORM has a little of both worlds.
Where did you grow up, and how did this influence your writing?
I grew up in Lincoln, Nebraska, although I have rural and small town roots on both my father's and mother's sides of the family. The first book I published was an anthology of short stories by various writers (including myself) about rural life. It was called THE PELICAN IN THE DESERT AND OTHER STORIES OF THE FAMILY FARM. Since I have always lived in the city, however, most of my stories tend to have an urban flavor. My novel IN HUMAN FORM has a little of both worlds.
When did you first start writing?
I wrote my first story when I was about 10 and wrote off and on throughout high school, but I didn't start submitting my stories to magazines until I was a senior in high school. Like most novice writers I thought editors would be stumbling over themselves to get their hands on my work. So I sent my first submission to THE NEW YORKER, which promptly and unceremoniously sent it back. Looking back on that rejection I'm forever grateful to the NEW YORKER editor that that story never saw print. But that was years and years ago. I can write much better now.
What's the story behind your latest book?
IN HUMAN FORM is the first in a series of novels about an android who becomes a human being because of her extended exposure to human beings. The fact that she is an android, however, makes her vulnerable to certain people who would exploit her. The series is about her struggle to remain free.
What motivated you to become an indie author?
I wanted to cut out the middle man or middle woman: the editors and editorial boards that decide whether or not to publish a book. At the major publishing houses the final decision usually is based on money, not quality: are enough people going to buy this book to significantly increase our bottom line? Speed is also a factor--it can take up to two years for a manuscript to go from acceptance to book store shelf. I wanted to be involved in a faster publication process, and I wanted my readers to decide for themselves whether my books were worthy of their time.
Published 2014-01-11.
Smashwords Interviews are created by the profiled author, publisher or reader.