Interview with Fox Emerson

Where did you grow up, and how did this influence your writing?
My family moved from Italy to Australia when I was really young, so I learned English at the age of 8. I got teased a lot because I had this Italian accent, so I learned to master English grammar. I won all the spelling competitions, went above and beyond to write better than my classmates. By the time I moved to London as a 20 year old, I had started writing for magazines for fun. So my influence came from turning a negative experience into a positive one!
What's the story behind your latest book?
Mr 303 started off as a romance. In fact, after writing Monique - which is a Memoir about a former prostitute and drug-mule, I thought it might have gone down a similar path. I was shocked when it became this dystopian and apocalyptic book with the romance component. Shocked but happy, because it's a genre I like anyway.
Do you really live in two countries?
Officially I live in 3 actually! I still officially live in Australia but I actually physically live in both London and Florence and travel between the two every week or two. I spend a lot of time on flights and trains which I use productively to write and catch up on emails and more work.
Where are your favourite places to write?
I write anywhere I can. Mostly from my apartments in London and Florence and I have cafes in both cities that I spend hours in through the week. I write a lot from Paperback in South Ealing in London and from Plaz in Florence.
Where do your ideas come from?
I have this strange but fun formula for writing. I've written for magazines and websites on demand and the one thing that always happens when I get a requirement is I get a complete blank and I suddenly think that I can't write. Then I start writing silly things like, how much I enjoy breakfast, what great things I'd like to do that day. Then my brain kicks into writing mode and maybe minutes, maybe hours later, I have something I can use.
What motivated you to become an indie author?
I realised that traditional publishing was dying in the new world of digital interconnection. There's no room for it and there really isn't any need for them. Traditional publishing houses pay you a tiny percentage and still expect you to do all the marketing for your book. So I figured why not take all the percentage and still do my own marketing.
How quickly do you write?
I write at 80 words per minute so I can almost type as fast I think, which is helpful when the ideas are coming at full speed!
I often write 10,000 words in a day. They might be complete garbage but I don't care at the time. If they're trash, I delete them or file them in case they become useful later. My best work has come from impromptu ideas which I've written in minutes.
What are you working on next?
Toby and Mr 303 Part 2 - The New World.
Toby is very different to Mr 303 and very similar to Monique. I seem to get drawn into the dark, gritty and seedy world of prostitution and drugs.
When you're not writing, how do you spend your time?
These days, I write a lot. I write full-time for magazines and websites which is about 65% of my time. Then I spend about 15% of my time writing books. Luckily, I enjoy writing, otherwise I'd realise that I spend 80% of my life working. I travel a lot too, mostly back and forth from London and Florence.
Do you remember the first story you ever wrote?
Yes, I wrote E.T. Part 2 when I was a kid after watching the movie! I loved it so much and was so disappointed that it ended that I chose to create my own sequel. It was a lot of fun and I realised then how much I enjoyed creating my own stories.
Do you think that there are too many writers out there right now?
Yes, there's more writers than there are readers. We are in a very interesting process of change; we are shifting from a traditional publishing model to an independent publishing model. There's teething problems with every big change. What I see happening over the next couple of years is that readers will help to sink bad authors and good authors will float. We're already starting to see the beginnings of this with reviews and websites promoting only popular books. That's a good thing. In the next 5 years, even though anyone can write a book, it won't see the light of day unless it is a genuine masterpiece. That's why genuine reviews are so important, it helps to clean up the trash from the gold.
What advice would you give other authors?
Write every day and write well. Don't ever publish anything until it's been edited at least twice by very thorough editors and you've had others review your work that aren't your family, your friends or people who already know you.
The best critics can be your best teachers.
Where do you find good books to read?
Interesting question. There are good websites popping up everywhere that promote good books. I always look at how difficult the author submission is to determine if I want to be a reader there. For example, one website tries to charge authors $600 to submit their books while many others don't charge at all. I wouldn't read any books from a website who slugs authors so much money. I think that's disgusting. So personally, I look at the author submission requirements and see how fair they are before I decide to become a reader of that website.
Published 2016-03-19.
Smashwords Interviews are created by the profiled author, publisher or reader.

Books by This Author

The Life of Q
Price: $0.99 USD. Words: 35,120. Language: English. Published: May 1, 2017. Categories: Fiction » Gay & lesbian fiction » Gay, Fiction » Erotica » Gay Erotica
This is a sequel to A Boy Called Q, about a young boy's second chance at life, after he chose to take his life because he struggled to cope having had a mm experience with a guy called Michael.
A Boy Called Q
Price: Free! Words: 15,050. Language: British English. Published: June 9, 2016. Categories: Nonfiction » Gay and Lesbian » Sex and health, Fiction » Gay & lesbian fiction » Gay
(5.00)
Q's first gay sexual experiece is amazing, mind-blowing stuff. But afterwards, he can't deal with the guilt, the disgust in himself and the realisation that he might be gay. Telling his family and his friends is not an option. Will he make a fatal decision?