Interview with Yogan Baum

What made you write this Book?
I should say it was survival instinct. I just had to do something not to suffocate, and, well, what can a poor boy do?
Would you go to Japan again, knowing what the future held for you?
That is an easy question. I say YES! - Where else could I have found my wife, and where else our children?
Who are you trying to reach with this book?
I tell my story, the best I can, and would be glad to reach many, many readers. My story is at the same time quite ordinary
and quite special. Living through a catastrophy like the one we were in, and are in, you learn a thing or two. I wish I could contribute to a better understanding of the dangers we court so nonchalantly in making ourselves dependent on nuclear plants and all the rest.
What do you like best about Japan?
It's the incredible patience people have in the face of adversity, and on a personal level, the friendliness they show me.
What do you hate about Japan?
I should say the way most politicians and media never ever are honest with the people.
What do you believe will be the future of energy in this country, Japan?
It is going to be nuclear, no doubt, to some extent. The chance to get out fast was squandered. It will be a long slog to go green here. The big players are so entrenched, unfortunately, that newcomers have an extremely hard time here.
What do you miss most when you're away from Japan?
I miss my home, of course.
What are your hobbies?
I like reading. Also love swimming in the sea. In September the sea is just too beautiful! Provided there are no typhoons near!
Who is your favorite Japanese writer?
I guess Yukio Mishima. Absolutely crazy, but, what a writer! Even in translation. ( I read very little Japanese, unfortunately. )
"This is so typically Japanese!" - WHAT is?
Tatami and sliding doors. Smiles. Honesty. Restraint. Constraint. An old house. Cats. Hard work!
Published 2016-03-02.
Smashwords Interviews are created by the profiled author, publisher or reader.

Books by This Author

The Voice of Fukushima: A Cry from the Heart - Ground Zero 03: Home but Home no More
Series: The Voice of Fukushima: A Cry from the Heart. Pre-release—available December 1, 2018. Price: $3.99 USD. Language: English. Categories: Nonfiction » Biography » Autobiographies & Memoirs, Nonfiction » History » Asian
Coming home from a holiday they never wanted to take Yogan Baum and his wife have to confront a terror you can’t smell, can’t hear, can’t see. Life has its demands however and people near Fukushima Dai-ichi either leave or try to cope with their fear. Extraordinary efforts are made to somehow go back to life as it was before the disaster of 3/11. Yogan and his wife try to get back on their feet.
The Voice of Fukushima: A Cry from the Heart - Ground Zero 02: Tsunami and Worse
Series: The Voice of Fukushima: A Cry from the Heart. Price: $3.99 USD. Words: 56,290. Language: English. Published: October 17, 2016. Categories: Nonfiction » Biography » Autobiographies & Memoirs, Nonfiction » History » Asian
(5.00 from 1 review)
Unaware that the M 9.0 megaquake of March 11, 2011 was just the beginning of it all Yogan Baum narrowly escapes the ensuing tsunami. In search of his wife he slowly realizes the really bad news is still to come. Next morning the north-flying Chinooks overhead tell their own story. Reunited to his wife the flight from Fukushima is on. Japan is on the brink and the whole world is watching Dai-ichi.
The Voice of Fukushima: A Cry From The Heart - Ground Zero 01: Earthquake
Series: The Voice of Fukushima: A Cry from the Heart. Price: Free! Words: 37,620. Language: English. Published: March 2, 2016. Categories: Nonfiction » Biography » Autobiographies & Memoirs, Nonfiction » History » Asian
(5.00 from 1 review)
In Part 1 of the ebook serial “The Voice of FUKUSHIMA - A Cry From the Heart” Yogan Baum, longtime resident of Yotsukura, a fishing village near Fukushima, relates how he experienced the M 9.0 Tohoku mega quake of 3/11/2011. Awed by the intensity of the experience he is unaware of its consequences. This book weaves a tapestry entwining both raw terror and some of the fruits of years of reflection.