Interview with Tim Candler

Are you interviewing yourself and if so why?
Yes I am. Quite why, I'm not exactly certain. Looking out the window, I saw fourteen turkey, two deer and a flock of blue jay. They don't have to explain themselves, but I apparently have a need to.
Why do you write?
I like building places and making up people, exploring these places and understanding these people. I like the idea of language belonging to nowhere and to no one, it's part of us all, like fingers and toes. Which is why I like to think of writing as footprints in sand, or hand prints on a wall, or shadows that move. And we look and we wonder. It builds story in our mind, where did it come from, where is it going, what does it mean. Then it howls, it purrs, it cruises the milky way if it chooses to. We share it. So maybe writing is a way that I can be in your mind and you can be in my mind. Kind of scary, maybe a little creepy, but also kind of nice.
What kind of stories do you write?
They can be a little strange. And I can be a little full of myself, take on a somewhat pompous tone. But I guess they'd be character driven comedic transgressive fiction with biographical under currents and hints of raw unapologetic angst. Which I hope translates to an excellent read.
A frequent question is: What was your first story?
I'm glad you asked that. I was at boarding school on the slopes of the Kenya side of the Elgon Caldera. I was about six, seven, eight or nine, I might even have been ten. The story was about a man looking for a hippo tooth out of which to fashion a button for his tunic. How the story ended then I can't remember. Fifty, maybe sixty years later, I'm still writing that story, it's still not finished. But I did recently discover its title, which is The Rabbit of Usk.
Are titles important?
They help concentrate the mind when things start going haywire, as they do sometimes for years and years. For the reader, titles might provide a sense of the story. So yes, sooner or later titles are very important.
Are you big on revision?
A person who can't spell has to be very big indeed on revision. I revise sentences warily, however. I first try to grasp what I was trying to say before commencing a pogrom. And there can be something very satisfying about a potlatch ceremony, complete destruction of the entire manuscript, and starting again. It's liberating, offers the story an independence, from where it can arise refreshed, or not at all.
Who are your favorite writers?
You have the religious thinkers and the philosophers, the big heads as I like to think of them. My own interest in them kind of ends with Sartre, where everything gets kind of bogged down in specialization and prancing around in front of television cameras to fund second homes in the Lake District. Then on through Genet before going backwards to the more interesting stuff. Peter Cheney's tales of Lemmy Caution, special agent of the FBI. JG Ballard, just love his Downed World. There are some fine comic book writers around. Not sure I liked anyone from the eighties or nineties. Dull, dull years for us people. But things are changing. I like George Monbiot, he nearly died once near to where I spent time as a schoolboy. A useful experience for a writer. I could go on......
How many stories have you had published?
Three. Tree Swallows and Tomatoes, Cake, White Bread Sparrows.
How many stories have you yourself published?
Halibut's End Story will be the first. Saint Haddock's Book, will be the second, Mr. Cod's Tanager will be the third.
Are most of your stories about birds or fish?
I don't think any of them are. Unless I missed one.
Is there a stigma attached to self publishing?
Yes there is. There's a stigma always attached to the challenges of technology and of change. It's history that eventually decides these things. Much about this stigma has to do with whether or not a story is worth reading, well proofed, properly cared for and actually readable. For many, a vetting by others and a fall to propaganda, is the safer route. I can understand why.
Published 2014-09-10.
Smashwords Interviews are created by the profiled author, publisher or reader.

Books by This Author

The Letlander
Series: The Rabbit of Usk, Book 6. Price: $2.99 USD. Words: 80,970. Language: English. Published: November 7, 2015. Categories: Fiction » Biographical, Nonfiction » Social Science » Anthropology / Cultural
Timotei and his grandfather while attempting to return to the English Island find work in the hotel and catering industry. Their employer is of English Speaking origin and it's as well that our hero wisely disguises himself as a Letlander while he diligently engages in the many obligations of a housemaid, a waiter and a kitchen hand for an expatriate community of English people.
A Windral
Series: The Rabbit of Usk, Book 5. Price: $2.99 USD. Words: 87,690. Language: English. Published: July 31, 2015. Categories: Fiction » Biographical, Nonfiction » Social Science » Anthropology / Cultural
Timotei and his grandfather have been released upon their own recognizance. Free from the disciplines and follies of the barracks and with no thought for their own better judgment our two Sphinx Sabeans choose to engage in a quest for JH. They are soon engaged in the pox of aimless wandering during which our hero gets a pair of free boots and he discovers his grandfather might have been a Saint.
Mathurin
Series: The Rabbit of Usk, Book 4. Price: $2.99 USD. Words: 74,550. Language: English. Published: March 15, 2015. Categories: Fiction » Biographical, Nonfiction » Social Science » Anthropology / Cultural
Tells of our hero's preoccupation with the initials JH, the failure of King Alfred, the Sabean understanding of punishment, the Sheedi veneration of the crocodile, the continuing domination of Saxons by their Norman Overlords, and onward into the world.
A Derailment
Series: The Rabbit of Usk, Book 3. Price: $2.99 USD. Words: 85,280. Language: English. Published: January 19, 2015. Categories: Fiction » Biographical, Nonfiction » Social Science » Anthropology / Cultural
(5.00)
Tells of our hero's attempt to grasp the nature of seasons, English Speaking People, the London Underground and the domination of Saxons by their Norman overlords.
A Weaver of Inclines
Series: The Rabbit of Usk, Book 2. Price: $2.99 USD. Words: 41,180. Language: English. Published: November 6, 2014. Categories: Fiction » Biographical, Nonfiction » Social Science » Anthropology / Cultural
(4.00)
A Weaver of Inclines, tells of our hero's first attempt to belong to the clans of the English. This attempt is ably assisted by a man of many parts whose substance and advice is up for debate.
One Small Boy
Series: The Rabbit of Usk, Book 1. Price: $2.99 USD. Words: 30,650. Language: English. Published: October 1, 2014. Categories: Fiction » Biographical
One Small Boy, tells of a friendship that developed between two small boys in a world where electricity, turkeys and the game of golf were novelties. The year was 1958 and the times were rapidly changing.
One Small Boy And A Kerosene Fridge
Series: One Small Boy, Book 5. Price: Free! Words: 2,310. Language: English. Published: September 16, 2014. Categories: Fiction » Biographical
In 1958 a small boy learns a little about England and cures a kerosene fridge....
One Small Boy And Electricity
Series: One Small Boy, Book 4. Price: Free! Words: 1,700. Language: English. Published: September 15, 2014. Categories: Fiction » Biographical
In 1958 a small boy visits a market and learns about electricity...
One Small Boy And a Bicycle
Series: One Small Boy, Book 3. Price: Free! Words: 1,940. Language: English. Published: September 14, 2014. Categories: Fiction » Biographical
In 1958 one small boy contemplates a bicycle and makes a friend...
One Small Boy And A Turkey
Series: One Small Boy, Book 2. Price: Free! Words: 2,770. Language: English. Published: September 13, 2014. Categories: Fiction » Biographical
In 1958 a small boy guards a turkey and gets a pat on the head..
One Small Boy And A Golf Ball
Series: One Small Boy, Book 1. Price: Free! Words: 1,650. Language: English. Published: September 13, 2014. Categories: Fiction » Biographical
In 1958 a small boy earns a shilling and he learns a few words from the English Language...
Halibut's End Story
Price: $2.99 USD. Words: 34,230. Language: English. Published: September 12, 2014. Categories: Fiction » Humor & comedy » Black comedy
Wilfred, an excellent businessman and negotiator, believes a well publicized personal tragedy will improve his tattered reputation. Halibut, an honest accountant, is hiding out in an isolated cabin Wilfred owns. When Wilfred flies in with the blindfolded, apparently lifeless body of his fifth wife, Halibut sees a suspicious number but he's certain his employer has a well documented explanation.