Christopher Geoffrey McPherson

Biography

In more than three decades as a professional writer/journalist, Christopher has covered myriad subjects and interviewed thousands of people from the famous to the unknown. He brings his years of experience to each one of his novels.

Every work is different. Through reading his novels, you can visit the American home front in the 1940s, a future San Francisco wiped out by a killer earthquake, a romantic love affair in post-war Paris in the 1920s, a future planet where the major industry is making babies -- or an exciting detective series set in 1930s Los Angeles.

In his career, his work has appeared in daily newspapers, monthly magazines, extensively on radio and the occasional dalliance with television. He has written advertising copy and radio commercials -- and continues to write.

Christopher is currently working on a series of novels that take place in 1930s Los Angeles called “The James Murray Mysteries.” Books in the series are "Murder at Eastern Columbia," “Sabotage at RKO Studio” and the newest “Abduction at Griffith Observatory.”

Other works featuring his byline include "The Babi Makers" -- a science fiction tale about a world where the most important resource is babies; "Sarah & Gerald" -- a novel about Paris in the 1920s; "Forever - and other stories" -- a collection of short stories; "The Life Line" -- the novel of the big one that levels San Francisco; "News on the Home Front" -- a novel of two friends during World War Two; and "Mama Cat" -- a book for children. Also, several short plays, a few radio plays and a boatload of radio documentaries.

Smashwords Interview

Your author slogan is “a different world in every book.” Why don’t you pick one topic and just write books about that? That seems to work for everyone else.
I have too many stories in me to confine myself to just one world. Since I was a kid, I’ve been fascinated by the period between the wars -- roughly 1919 - 1946. Several of my novels are set during that time. Look at everything that occurred: radio (its beginning and rise to prominence), film (from silent to sound), music (swing and big band), art (cubism and the avant-garde), theater (the Group Theatre), literature (F. Scott Fitzgerald), dance (Isadora Duncan) -- and so much more. It can be argued that those years were some of the most influential in the whole of the twentieth century. So much fertile ground for one story after another.

With two exceptions, all my novels take place during that time; but, so far, all the stories have been different: the American home front during World War Two, Paris in the 1920s, and a film-noir detective story set in 1930s Los Angeles. In addition to those, I’ve written about a future San Francisco destroyed by an earthquake, and a world on another planet where the making of babies is the prime industry.
What is your writing process like?
You always hear of writers who sit down at their typewriter at 8:00 a.m. and write straight through until noon making sure they turn out at least ten pages a day. I'm nothing like that: ninety-percent of writing happens before you ever sit down at the typewriter. The research, the thinking about characters, about how they interact with each other and with the plot -- these all come first. I spend a lot of time cogitating about the research, the people, the ideas and let them organize themselves in my mind. At some point everything aligns itself just right and I sit down and start typing. This probably comes from my many years working at newspapers. When you’re on deadline, you don't have the luxury of writing and rewriting. On many occasions, I had to sit down and type out what became the article, with no time for rewrites. I guess I taught myself to organize the details in my head while I was driving back to the paper.

Once I do start writing, I’m concentrating on just getting things down. I don't worry too much about specifics of plot -- I put down something like "they meet at a restaurant and have a fight about something." I can clarify it later. Once that’s done, I put away the pages for a few days and think about something totally different. This allows me to clear my mind. Then, I go back and read what I wrote. This is when the book begins to take shape. I try to write every day -- sometimes new pages, sometimes rewriting or editing. But, if I don't feel like writing I don't. You can’t force yourself to write. It has to flow naturally.
Read more of this interview.

Where to find Christopher Geoffrey McPherson online


Where to buy in print


Books

Abduction at Griffith Observatory
By
Price: $4.98 USD. Words: 70,390. Language: English. Published: June 1, 2014. Category: Fiction » Mystery & detective » Historical
Los Angeles. 1935. Writer James Murray is hard at work on a third novel, living with the girl he loves and enjoying a life he once could only dream about. But an innocent outing to Los Angeles’s new Griffith Observatory changes all that when a commotion during a presentation leads to a kidnapping. James feels compelled to find out the truth behind it.
Sabotage at RKO Studio
By
Price: $4.98 USD. Words: 84,580. Language: American English. Published: January 2, 2014. Category: Fiction » Mystery & detective » Historical
Hollywood. 1933. James Murray’s first novel is a surprise success. On contract at a major film studio, he tries to figure out what’s behind a series of accidents plaguing various productions -- including "King Kong," the studio’s new film. "Sabotage at RKO Studio" is two novels in one: two parallel stories, featuring two heroes, working two cases in two different versions of 1930s Hollywood.
Murder at Eastern Columbia
By
Price: $0.99 USD. Words: 67,200. Language: English. Published: May 27, 2013. Category: Fiction » Mystery & detective » Historical
Los Angeles. 1931. James Murray, clerk in the Junior Boy's department at the swankest new department store downtown, suddenly finds himself trying to solve the murder of his best friend before time runs out. "Murder at Eastern Columbia" is two novels in one: two parallel stories, featuring two heroes, working two murders in two different versions of 1930s Los Angeles.
The Babi Makers
By
Price: $2.98 USD. Words: 53,270. Language: English. Published: January 16, 2013. Category: Fiction » Science fiction » General
(3.50 from 2 reviews)
Welcome to Nové, a planet much like your own. There is no war or hunger. No conflict of any kind. It's a "happy life ever" on this utopian world. Balance has finally been achieved after all life was nearly extinguished during The Fall. There is one major industry on Nové: the making of babies. Babies are the most important resource on the planet.
Sarah & Gerald
By
Price: $3.98 USD. Words: 41,280. Language: English. Published: September 3, 2012. Category: Fiction » Romance » Historical
(4.00 from 2 reviews)
In the years after the great war, life was golden and happy for those who had survived it. An entire generation of young men died so others could sit on a beach and splash in the water and have sandwiches on the sand. It was a golden time for American expatriates -- like Sarah and Gerald -- to be in Paris.
Forever -- and other stories
By
Price: $1.98 USD. Words: 36,600. Language: English. Published: April 24, 2012. Category: Fiction » Anthologies » Short stories - single author
(5.00 from 1 review)
A collection of stories about life -- and death -- and life forever. Includes "Forever" a story of two souls that continue meeting in one life after another.
The Life Line
By
Price: $2.98 USD. Words: 61,570. Language: English. Published: March 14, 2012. Category: Fiction » Drama » American
Take three men and two women, add one concrete underwater tunnel, shake vigorously with a major earthquake and you have the makings of "The Life Line" -- a novel of survival.
News on the Home Front
By
Price: $2.98 USD. Words: 84,110. Language: English. Published: February 22, 2012. Category: Fiction » Historical » USA
(3.50 from 2 reviews)
Set against a worldwide canvas that includes New York, Paris and Germany "News on the Home Front" tells the story of two women who have been friends since their childhood in West Lake, Maryland. The world war has torn apart their lives leaving each trying to find a way to put it back together. It's been a difficult few years with rationing and shortages starting to take their toll.

Christopher Geoffrey McPherson’s tag cloud

1920s    1930s    apocalypse    astronomy    babies    children    cinema    corporations    crime    death    department store    downtown    earthquake    fate    film    france    friendship    future    germany    great depression    hollywood    home front    journalism    king kong    los angeles    love    mating    military    movie studio    movies    murder    nazis    observatory    painting    paris    pearl harbor    rationing    reincarnation    romance    sabotage    san francisco    scandal    supernatural    survival    suspense    terror    utopia    women in the workforce    world war one    world war two    writer    young writer