Clodia Metelli

Biography

I grew up in London, spending a childhood largely immersed in books and my own world of make-believe, fuelled by a kaleidoscope of literary and historical obsessions. This has mostly set the pattern for my life so far, and inspired me to spend years studying Greco-Roman society, gaining an MA and a PhD in the process.

Now I live by the sea with my partner and a black cat called Achilles.

I write both fantasy and historical fiction. Often my stories have a gay romance theme.

Most of my historical fiction is set in the ancient Graeco-Roman period, which I studied for many years and which remains a passion with me (reading Suetonius can have a terribly corrupting effect on a young mind...).

I aim to offer an alternative, more internalised window on Graeco-Roman society, the emotional and cultural lives of courtesans and poets rather than the deeds of gladiators and victorious generals. An elegiac rather than epic perspective.

I also like to explore that period’s differing attitudes to sex and gender and imagine how individuals may have responded to the mores of their time, whether consciously defying them or finding some kind of liveable compromise.

My fantasy fiction includes both urban vampire stories set in contemporary London and fantasy set in the ancient and decaying civilisation of Laurentium.

Where to find Clodia Metelli online


Books

The Education of Gaius
Series: Gaius and Tiberius. Price: Free! Words: 14,140. Language: British English. Published: February 2, 2015. Categories: Fiction » Erotica » Gay Erotica, Fiction » Historical » Ancient
Roman aristocrat, Gaius Manlius Torquatus is enjoying life as a poet and socialite with some of the most brilliant and sophisticated men and women of the Late Roman Republic. An unusually gentle man in that violent age, Gaius is tormented by the suspicion that his desires make him a monster of cruelty and depravity. Can Gaius' lover convince him that there are men who'd love to be his victim?
Mortal Peril
Price: $2.99 USD. Words: 62,240. Language: British English. Published: October 30, 2014. Categories: Fiction » Fantasy » Contemporary, Fiction » Gay & lesbian fiction » Gay
Martin, a young man of twenty has lived as a vampire in London for over two hundred years, never straying far from the side of his lover, Roderick. One evening, he returns to their den to find Roderick gone with no explanation. Can Martin survive the lonely life of a single vampire or will he give way to despair? Flame haired mortal Anthony presents a very dangerous distraction.
Meeting Tiberius and Other Roman Tales
Series: Gaius and Tiberius. Price: $0.99 USD. Words: 20,420. Language: British English. Published: January 29, 2014. Categories: Fiction » Historical » Classical Greece & Rome, Fiction » Gay & lesbian fiction » Gay
Tales drawn from the universe of Gaius and Achilles and Dancing Phaedra. Set in the tumultuous final decades of the Roman Republic, the stories centre on the amorous lives of a group of friends and lovers living on the fringes of Rome's creative demi monde . NB Other than the first story, they contain 'spoilers' for the earlier published works.
Dancing Phaedra
Series: Gaius and Tiberius. Price: $2.99 USD. Words: 41,820. Language: British English. Published: September 22, 2013. Categories: Fiction » Historical » Ancient, Fiction » Gay & lesbian fiction » Gay
A young slave whore in a Roman brothel, Antyllus' prospects seem bleak. Only a sense of his destiny keeps him from despair. A gifted and inspired dancer, Antyllus dreams of stardom. Sent to a rich man's party as part of the entertainment, Antyllus' gift is spotted by Gabinius a wealthy Senator. Struggling to leave his past behind, Antyllus must contend with a new master and new life as a dancer.
Gaius and Achilles
Series: Gaius and Tiberius. Price: $3.99 USD. Words: 82,120. Language: British English. Published: September 26, 2011. Categories: Fiction » Historical » Classical Greece & Rome, Fiction » Gay & lesbian fiction » Gay
(3.33)
During the time of the Late Roman Republic, Achilles Aristides, a young aristocrat from Paphos, finds his life thrown into confusion when he is captured by pirates, separated from his lover Hippothous and becomes the slave of decadent Roman poet Gaius Manlius Torquatus.

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Smashwords book reviews by Clodia Metelli

  • The Persian on Oct. 17, 2011

    The story of Vaz, a young Iranian art student in London, who goes on a night out with his new friends and inexplicably wakes up next to a dead body. This was an enjoyable read; there is generally a good-hearted, somehow innocent feel throughout most of the novel,which is written in a chatty, colloquial style, with a strong emphasis on the redemptive power of love – this makes it the more shocking when things turn very dark indeed. The setting in Walthamstow and the group of people Vaz becomes part of are vividly realised. The author has a good sense of place and description and clearly knows and loves the great Metropolis. Crime is not my favourite genre, but the workings of the plot did somewhat stretch my credulity; however, I very often find that to be the case. The novel could do with re-editing: there are lots of minor errors, especially with punctuation, the abuse of apostrophes being really quite painful. There are also sentences which were obviously hastily written and leave the meaning unclear. This was a free ebook and an enjoyable entertaining novel, so really, I’m not complaining.
  • Selected Short Stories on Oct. 17, 2011
    (no rating)
    The first two stories in this collection centre around the characters of Tom and Sean. For the most part, I adored them. A dedicated nurse at a London hospital, Sean is also a joyful submissive with a subversive sense of humour and a healthy streak of masochism. His lover, wealthy corporate lawyer Tom, is the perfect master - cruel, caring, attentive and ingenious. On another level, the two are simply lovers, who talk and joke freely and intimately. Their dynamic and the play between them was delightful - then something happened that squicked me personally, though I accepted that Sean enjoyed it well enough. Skipping over the bit that squicked me like a responsible adult, I made it to the end of the story. I confess the ending jarred me slightly, though I don't know what the alternative could have been. That Sean who spent his life caring for others should have to be the recipient of beneficence to have a decent standard of living grated on me, but that sadly is the current reality. The second story, Tom and Sean describes how the two got together in the first place - I was delighted to have another helping of them! The story was convincing in the vividness of its various London settings and also there was a lovely bedroom scene. I was intrigued by the shorter stories that filled the centre of the book, but none of them individually stand out in my recollection. The author shows a wonderful interest and compassion for all sides of life, particularly the less fortunate (this showed up for example in Sean's thinking about the lonely death of a patient, but not sharing this with Tom out of instinctive respect for the patient's privacy). This aspect of the author's writing showed through particularly in the last story, set in London around Christmas time, when a self-absorbed, Christmas-hating individual learns the joys of helping others, when he meets a man who is recovering from a very difficult past. A reworking of the Christmas Carol motif that is romantic and life-affirming without being at all cloying.
  • Cold Front (Pindone Files #1) on Aug. 17, 2012

    It took me a little while to get into this book initially, maybe because it was quite episodic at the beginning, but once the main plot got going I quickly found myself hooked! This book is both a taut thriller and a kinky love story. Dek and Ren are both quite tough, macho guys and both have troubled histories so their relationship isn't typically 'romantic' but the tenderness and loyalty between them came across as all the more raw and real for that. The BDSM aspect of their relationship is made very clear towards the beginning of the novel and remains a potent undercurrent in their relationship. It doesn't define them as individuals or as a couple but it is an integral part of who they are. This is a novel in which readers are definitely not spoon-fed, in any sense. We are thrown head-first into this other world - another planet or another reality - it's never explained and probably doesn't matter - and left to work things out for ourselves by picking up on details about the world and the society as they emerge and making sense of them for ourselves. We are also not allowed the luxury of believing that anyone can suffer horrific events without damage and trauma, that evil doesn't leave a lasting legacy. I really enjoyed this darkly absorbing book and found myself caring for its outwardly tough, inwardly vulnerable heroes.