Greyhart Press

Publisher info

Launched April 2011, Greyhart Press is an indie e-publisher of horror, science fiction, fantasy, and suspense fiction. We love short stories, novelettes and novellas. Novels coming later in 2011.

They say you are judged by the company you keep. I think that is increasingly true of the small e-press. I haven't yet published any Hugo winners, but I have published stories by authors who have appeared in anthologies alongside such stellar talents as Neil Gaiman, Stephen Baxter, Alan Moore, Lauren Beukes, Dan Abnett, Liz Williams, Ken MacLeod.

Check our website often for the latest promotional deals.

Tim C Taylor - Publisher

Where to find Greyhart Press online

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The Legends of Light
Price: $0.99 USD. Words: 16,300. Language: English. Published: November 1, 2011 by Greyhart Press. Categories: Fiction » Poetry » Contemporary Poetry, Fiction » Young adult or teen » Fantasy
A high fantasy saga in six poems. For adults and young adults. Crafted to be enjoyed by readers who do not normally read poetry, but do enjoy fantasies such as Eragon, The Lord of the Rings, and the sagas of Norse legend. Each poem builds upon the last to weave a tapestry of magic, dark creatures, and romance. Each poem features an illustrated title page.

Greyhart Press' tag cloud

dwarf    dwarves    elf    elves    fantasy    goblin    goblins    knights    love    magic    poems    poetry    quest    romance    saga    wizard    young adult   

Smashwords book reviews by Greyhart Press

  • Fistful of Reefer on Dec. 09, 2011

    I picked up this book at launch because I’d already read and enjoyed the author’s short fiction. From the title, I thought this might be a stoner’s ode to weed. I wasn’t too keen on that, but a good author can make any subject matter read well, so I took a chance. I’m so glad I did. Marihuana is a key McGuffin in the book, but not in a way you’d guess. I guess I’d classify it as an adventure story. The title sounds like the film Fistful of Dollars, doesn’t it? Well, it is reminiscent of spaghetti westerns, but actually, it reminded me more of the Good the Bad and the Ugly because that was a film with more movement, almost an episodic feel. Remember that scene where main characters ride into the middle of the Civil War. Well Fistful of Reefer was a bit like that: the characters keep on moving and keep stumbling on twists and turns and new characters. The Reefer plot is much more carefully threaded together, though. I’d rather not reveal too much of the plot or style because it’s a delight to discover for yourself. I’ll mention Texas Rangers, wagons, tractors, ranches, steam trains, shootouts, and politicians. It’s set in the Texas-Mexico border in a version of the early twentieth century that isn’t quite the same as ours. The rest is up to you find out.