Lynn Arbor

Biography

Lynn Arbor was born in Ann Arbor, Michigan, and has lived in California, Massachusetts, Colorado, and Illinois. She’s spent her life writing and making art. When her daughter and son were little she wrote children’s books: Grandpa’s Long Red Underwear was published by Lothrop, Lee & Shepard Books. She contributed to a decorating column in the Detroit News and wrote two unpublished novels. For twenty-five years she made her living as a graphic designer, but after serious illness, she turned to fine art. She’s best known in the Detroit area as a painter. When she created a website for her paintings, she wanted to include a link to her blog—which meant she had to write a blog. The blog reminded her of the pleasure of writing, which has occupied most of her time for the past four years. She lives in Pleasant Ridge, Michigan, with her architect husband, John Bogner.

Smashwords Interview

What are you working on next?
I'm writing a new novel tentatively titled, "A Bird in the House," about an old woman who is caretaker for her 90 year-old mother and the conflicts she has with her greedy brother. I've been reading some of the chapters to my writers group and I'm funnier than I imagined. Well, I knew I was funny, but they really get hooting over this one. It's funny but serious. Tricky and challenging.
Who are your favorite authors?
Alice Munro for her humanity, Barbara Kingsolver for her love of the environment, Doris Kearns Goodwin for her in-depth research and story telling ability, Ben Yagota for his information and humor. John Gardner for "The Art of Fiction" and "Grendel" and the mastery of his words.
Read more of this interview.

Where to find Lynn Arbor online


Books

Intentional, A Novel
Price: $2.99 USD. Words: 78,510. Language: English. Published: February 7, 2015. Categories: Fiction » Literature » Literary
In a compelling story of life after the death of a loved one by suicide, this novel is a powerful exploration of how family and friends cope with loss. Grief, with its long, unrelenting fingers, pokes into secrets—recent and long forgotten—as the survivors discover themselves braver and more compassionate then they could have imagined.

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