Lizella Prescott

Biography

Lizella writes a dark and tasty blend of suspense, fantasy, and experimental short fiction. She’s also partial to epic poetry, Greek mythology and anything Dystopian.

When she’s not dreaming up new ways to torture fairy princesses, Lizella writes business journalism under a different pseudonym and tries to keep up with one husband, two kids, and four large dogs.

Where to find Lizella Prescott online


Books

Wife. Daughter. Dessert.
Price: Free! Words: 1,800. Language: English. Published: July 11, 2017. Categories: Fiction » Fantasy » Dark, Fiction » Fantasy » Short stories
(4.50 from 2 reviews)
Eighteen-year-old Anya is sold in marriage to a rich and cruel old man. Her stepdaughter Sela promises help, but where do her loyalties really lie? At 1,000 words, this story is flash fiction and can be devoured in 15 minutes or less.
The Princess and the Plague
Price: Free! Words: 2,170. Language: English. Published: July 11, 2017. Categories: Fiction » Fantasy » Dark, Fiction » Literature » Literary
(4.00 from 2 reviews)
The people love the princess. And the princess loves the people. But the people have the plague. And the king and his ministers aren't working on a cure. Will the princess disobey her father to save her people? And, if she does, will she die alongside them? At roughly 1,000 words, this story is flash fiction and can be devoured in 15 minutes or less.

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Smashwords book reviews by Lizella Prescott

  • Breakers of the Dawn on March 23, 2016

    *I received a free ARC for an honest review.* Breakers of the Dawn is an epic sci fi saga that blends elements of fantasy and good old fashioned space opera. Unlike so many books in this genre, it doesn’t stun you with a big data dump at the beginning. Instead, it plunges you into the action from the first page, and lets the world building unfold naturally. The writing style is clean and simple, allowing the story to take center stage. The narrative moves quickly and shifts between multiple perspectives, both human and alien. You can easily inhale it in one sitting. While the plot is complex, I was able to keep track of it all, and it came together nicely in the end. Ironically, my biggest criticism is that this book may not have been long enough. More fully realized characters—especially the humans—as well as additional detail on the Ashamine (human) and Entho-la-ah-mine (insect) civilizations would have made this debut novel even better. As with most indie books, there are a few minor formatting glitches, but nothing so distracting that it pulled me out of the action. Bottom line? This is a highly entertaining first novel, and I’m looking forward to seeing more from Zachariah.