Mardo Williams


Mardo Williams' story is right out of the pages of Horatio Alger whose books he read as a young boy. Alger's heroes valiantly overcome poverty and adversity and this seems to be exactly what he did. He grew up on a 100-acre subsistence farm; serendipitously--after he lost his job at the Kenton, Ohio car shops because of the Depression--he answered an ad and became the only reporter at the Kenton News-Republican, a small Ohio daily. (He'd always had an inclination to write.) He had no college degree but while he'd been cleaning out the insides of the smokestacks of the locomotives up in Toledo, he'd taken two courses at the business school there, shorthand and typing, and so he was prepared to be a reporter. He did all the beats, hoofed it around the small town of Kenton digging up stories on slow news days.

Nineteen years later, after World War II ended, the Columbus Dispatch recruited him to the copy desk. He moved up the ranks from the copy desk to travel editor . . . and in 1954 he was asked to develop and write stories about the world of business. Columbus was booming at this time. Mardo, familiar with pounding the pavement to search out stories, did just that. Within the year, he was writing a daily business column with byline.

After he retired from the Dispatch in 1970, he freelanced for several years, editing a newsletter and doing publicity. He began his second career, writing books, at age 88, after his wife died after a long illness. At his daughters' urging, he learned to use a computer and began writing his first book, Maude. It was about his mother, who lived to be 110, and also about life at the turn of the century when everything was done arduously by hand. This was to be for family, but his daughter Kay read a few sections to her writers group. They loved it, and wanted more.

The manuscript grew from 50 pages to a 334 page book with a 32 page picture insert. The finished product was published in 1996, Maude (1883--1993): She Grew Up with the Country. It has been adopted by some college American history classes as a supplemental text "to put a human face on history."

Then Mardo wrote an illustrated children's book, Great-Grandpa Fussy and the Little Puckerdoodles, based on the escapades of four of his great-grandchildren. He decided at age 92 that he would try something completely different--a novel, One Last Dance. His magnum opus.

He spent three years writing the first draft while touring with his first book, Maude. He persevered through illness and blindness, determined to finish it before he died. It was the most challenging piece of writing in his 73-year writing career--a long work of fiction when he'd been writing short non-fiction pieces for most of his life. After his death, his daughters Kay and Jerri spent another three years editing and revising One Last Dance, and after it was published, four more years touring with it as the centerpiece of their program, Keep Dancing!

One Last Dance fills a niche, especially now that the baby boomers have turned 65. The novel gives readers hope and laughs. Book discussion groups throughout the country have read it and loved it. Many readers have said, "Well, if Mardo could do this (embark on a new romance, write a book) in his nineties, I can certainly give it a try myself; I'm only 70 or 80 . . ."

Many honors came to Mardo and to his writing after his death. In 2006 One Last Dance won the Independent Publishers Award for Best Regional Fiction. The book was also one of five Finalists in the National Readers' Choice Awards for 2005. Before that, Mardo won an Ohioana Citation--their first posthumous--for his body of work as a journalist and author (for, at that time, Maude and Great-Grandpa Fussy).

His daughters, Kay and Jerri, won a 2009 Ohioana Citation for "unique and outstanding accomplishment in the field of writing and editing" for finishing One Last Dance.

Smashwords Interview

Mardo Williams' daughters, Kay and Jerri, were asked: What is the story behind the story of “One Last Dance: It’s Never Too Late to Fall in Love”?
Kay Williams: This romance novel was started by our dad Mardo Williams at age 92. He had had a distinguished career as journalist and author (for which he won an Ohioana Library Award). After he completed the first draft of “One Last Dance" he asked us, his daughters, to finish the book if he could not. He died a few weeks later. We honored his wishes.
Why did your father decided to write this book? What about the characters and situation appealed to him?
Jerri Williams Lawrence: When he was touring with his first book “Maude,” he met a woman who’d tracked him down after seeing him interviewed on TV. She came over to my house (in Ohio) to get her copy of “Maude” autographed. Dad discovered that he knew her. She’d worked at the “Columbus Dispatch” as an executive secretary on the fifth floor while Dad had worked in the newsroom on the fourth floor. After they talked about old times and Dad autographed her book, he pecked her lightly on the lips. She said later, “It was a kiss goodbye that became a kiss hello.”

As the two shared living quarters, the challenges became apparent. What did it take for an older adult, set in his ways, to begin a new life living with someone just as rigid and needy as he was. Enough material to fill a book, Dad thought. He had a great deal he wanted to say about aging and what it means to be in your nineties with the body failing and the mind and spirit still wanting it all. And he wanted to say it as humorously as possible. So he dropped his first idea of writing a newspaper novel and “One Last Dance” was born. Dad said “One Last Dance” was about “about two old duffers trying to keep their independence,” but it’s also about two people set in their ways who learn to change and grow and value their relationships.
Read more of this interview.

Where to find Mardo Williams online

Where to buy in print


One Last Dance
Mardo's daughters, Kay and Jerri, are interviewed by Merle Grace Kearns, Ohio Department of Aging, about finishing One Last Dance after their father's death.


Great-Grandpa Fussy and the Little Puckerdoodles
Price: $5.99 USD. Words: 10,220. Language: English. Published: March 13, 2012 by Calliope Press. Categories: Fiction » Children’s books » Family / Multigenerational, Fiction » Children’s books » Family / New Baby
They’re noisy, nosey and bossy—these little Puckerdoodles who have ensnared the heart of Great-Grandpa Fussy. Teenie, Weenie, Waddles, and Toodlebug range in age from newborn to age 6. In Great-Grandpa’s eyes they are unpredictable imps whose ingenious questions demand answers that only he can provide. Twenty-one stories and 64 four-color illustrations for ages 5 and up.
Maude (1883-1993): She Grew Up With the Country
Price: $9.99 USD. Words: 118,920. Language: English. Published: October 31, 2010 by Calliope Press. Categories: Nonfiction » History » American, Nonfiction » Biography » Historical biography
Maude started farm life as a pregnant bride of 19. By age 110, she’d lived through half of America’s history. With poetry and human dramas (two murders and a suicide), written by her son, a master journalist, the book shows the impact of the changing times on shy, unassuming Maude, her fun-loving husband Lee, and their four active children. An award-winning biography, with over 70 photographs.
One Last Dance: It's Never Too Late to Fall in Love
Price: $9.99 USD. Words: 140,130. Language: English. Published: June 18, 2010 by Calliope Press. Categories: Fiction » Romance » Adult, Fiction » Romance » Contemporary
After a disastrous first meeting, Morgan, 89, moves in with Dixie, age 79, strictly a business arrangement, both maintain. But Morgan has more frivolous pursuits in mind. When a troubled grandson collides with the daring course set by the lovers, not only does he save their lives, but he brings Dixie and Morgan the love and pride they’d lost decades before with the loss of their children.

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