Nancy O'Hare

Biography

I have always loved to travel. It lured me to a career in professional finance roles— after all, every company in every country needs accountants. Roles took me to Australia, Oman, Switzerland, Nigeria and a few other unexpected places. Living and working in such diverse regions has given me a broader perspective of different cultures and a revived respect for the people we live among.

By 2014, I craved something new. Not just another location to live and commute to another desk job, but something really different. My husband and I left our jobs, studied Spanish in Guatemala and travelled for five months through Central America and Cuba. This in itself was not unusual for us. In 2000, we took the slow road home to Canada after living and working in Australia for two years. We spent five months crossing Asia, Africa and Europe. By 2010, we needed another heavy dose of culture and spent twelve months exploring lesser-visited places across all seven continents.

But this time was different. I started writing a few shorter articles and posted them on LinkedIn. It felt liberating. Slowly, slowly, an idea emerged. Stories came flooding out as I recalled all the places my husband and I had ventured and obscure experiences we had shared. The title, Dust in My Pack, came to me in the middle of the night with vivid clarity and seemed to fit my collage of stories.

Now, my husband has turned to photography and I to writing. I feel like I have started a new phase in my life which I could not have done without going through such a varied career in the corporate world. I am energized to try to make an impact by continuing to travel, to challenge myself physically, be exposed to unexpected places and share these tales with those interested in our amazing world. Readers will gain a vivid insight into what destinations are really like plus practical travel tips to plan their own journey.

Smashwords Interview

What's the story behind your latest book?
Dust in My Pack pulls my most memorable journeys from the past twenty years to recreate the essence of remote destinations. The stories distil my research and learnings for each location by providing links and practical guidance enabling readers to devise their own trip. I aim to promote the "travel urge" in others so that they may also go beyond the average traveller's experiences.

The chapters cover a broad range of activities and countries, including adventures such as hikes and white-water rafting, archeological sites, amazing accommodations and unpredicted animal encounters.
Why did you publish Dust in My Pack as an ebook and not offer it in paperback?
A paperback version will be available later this year. Stay tuned!

If you are trying to decide which is best for you, here are my thoughts on paper vs ebook:

EBook:
- more affordable due to lower printing and shipping costs which I have passed on to the reader.
- lower carbon footprint (save a tree, save shipping emissions)
- less weight to carry around
- more discrete to read on a phone or tablet than hauling out a paper book. My travel moto is to blend in, to reduce potential triggers that scammers may spot.
- colour photos
- active links to websites referenced

Paperback:
- its paper, it feels nice to hold and read
- you can display it on your bookshelf

Whichever you choose, I hope you enjoy the read and your personal travel journey!
Read more of this interview.

Where to find Nancy O'Hare online


Where to buy in print


Books

Dust in My Pack
Price: $3.20 USD. Words: 73,200. Language: English. Published: July 25, 2017. Categories: Nonfiction » Travel » Essays & Travelogues, Nonfiction » Travel » Trip Journals
(5.00)
Dust in My Pack is a new kind of travel book. The author's stories emerged over twenty years of living and working in five continents and travelling through more than sixty countries. Dust in My Pack brings far-flung lands to life while providing practical guidance to help readers create their own personalized adventures. Tales range from adrenalin-inducing exploits to awe-inspiring sites.

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