Renee' La Viness

Biography

Renee La Viness never wanted to grow up, so she stopped at four feet, eleven inches tall. But, what is a grownup? Height? Age? Wisdom? The ability to reach the gas pedal?

At the age of thirteen, Renee' started her own business as a professional ventriloquist who wrote her own skits, handled her own advertising, and booked her own engagements. In more recent years, she has been published in magazines, newspapers, and anthologies, and is currently publishing some of her short stories that found their way into anthologies.

Renee' lives with her husband in Oklahoma, where they raised their family of boys and now live with a nervous Welsh Corgi and four ornery chickens.

Smashwords Interview

What are your five favorite books, and why?
Some of my favorites are series stories, not singles. I love Nancy Drew and The Little House on the Prairie. Why? Because I learned things from them, and both had a way of creating suspense that was emotional. Yes, I know Nancy Drew was written by different people. I actually like that thought, in a way.

I also like E.B. White's story, Charlotte's Web. Although it's a little over the top on possibilities in the real world, it encourages kids to keep on looking for solutions that work, even if they might sound a little silly, sometimes.

Another favorite is Kate Messner's book, Eye of the Storm. Tornadoes are one of my favorite subjects, and she creates the kind of intense emotions I connect with.

Ghosts Who Went to School, by Judith Spearing. This was a childhood favorite that still takes me back to my childhood, when I read it.

Johnny and the Tool Chest, by William D. Hayes. This book shares a timeless lesson about working for things you want. It's also a favorite of my 7-year-old grandson. We read it during his annual summer stay, this year. He loved it. He also worked very hard to earn a toy he wanted before he returned home for the school year.
What do you read for pleasure?
I love middle grade and young adult books. They are not 400 and 500 pages long. I don't have time for those. However, I stay more closely connected with the stories I like to write for those ages, if I'm reading that level.

I love old classics, like Swiss Family Robinson, The Time Machine, War of the Worlds.

I also enjoy a good DIY (Do It Yourself) book about something I want to know how to do. I don't have much leisure time, so I often spend it learning to do something I want or need to do.
Read more of this interview.

Where to find Renee' La Viness online

Books

Absent Reality - A Short Story
Price: $0.99 USD. (Free!) Words: 1,210. Language: English. Published: September 11, 2017. Categories: Fiction » Women's fiction » General, Fiction » Inspirational
(4.00 from 1 review)
A stroke reunites Megan and her mother after many years apart. Can they rebuild their relationship before it’s too late? A fictional short story with real possibilities.

Renee' La Viness' tag cloud

Renee' La Viness' favorite authors on Smashwords

Smashwords book reviews by Renee' La Viness

  • Brown Bear, White Hare on March 05, 2019

    Interesting. I relate to this in some ways. I've known people who turned out to have different preferences or ideas than I had always assumed. Or, they made choices I didn't always agree with. Sometimes, it's hard to remember they are the same person you knew BEFORE you knew about the changes or hidden differences. Not a bad way to share this concept. I didn't like the way the story was done at first. But as I considered it, I decided it was pretty good, after all.
  • Tenacious Tree on March 05, 2019

    Nicely done. I like the author's different perspective.
  • I Was Monster on March 25, 2019

    I liked this short story. It seemed a little dry at the ending but nicely done. Thanks for the good read.
  • The Big Bad Red Dog on March 25, 2019

    I can not say this book won't help someone learn to read. If used well, I suppose it could. However, it was overly busy and overly redundant (too repetitive) and much of the punctuation was incorrect. A good editor could have helped make this book much better. This is not a book I would recommend for someone who is color blind, or bothered by too much busy-ness on a page.
  • Bumble and Tuck in Chicken Poop on March 25, 2019

    This was a pretty good story with a feel-good vibe. It was missing pictures, and the words were practically right on top of each other, so it was hard to read. (I used the online reader.) I wish the lines were double-spaced. It would have helped. I hope the author fixes these issues.
  • Chatty Clam Spreads Gossip on March 25, 2019

    Good story. I loved the illustrations. I wish the fibs were not so close to what was said. Children, especially, do not always understand exactly what is being said. In their first couple of years in school, my grandkids thought that if someone didn't want to play with them today, that person didn't like them anymore. It took a long time for them to see that wasn't the case. So, in their eyes, it might have been easy for Chatty to assume that Sunny didn't like Clown Fish anymore, or that Sunny was too busy, etc., by what had been said. It wasn't obvious that what was being said was not simply her interpretation of the truth. (That's what I thought the author intended it to be.) However, I did notice the story was changing a little each time. Was Chatty wrong for sharing what she thought Clown Fish had said? Maybe so, after embellishing the story a little more each time. We all see/interpret things differently. If we are not allowed to talk to others about what we have seen or heard, we would have to stop communicating with each other. I was glad to see that Chatty apologized and promised to try to do better, though. Even if you're sharing what you believed to be the truth, it's important to apologize and try to make amends if you learn you were wrong. It's just as important to be receptive to that apology, which this story did seem to show. Good story, overall.