Caroline Wood

Biography

I have always loved writing and can't remember a time when I didn't write.
If not actually writing I was usually creating stories to tell my sister. Luckily, she was happy to listen.
And if not doing either of those, I made up stories in my head. I still do.
An overheard snippet of conversation is often all it takes...
I like to explore the darkness, strangeness or unexpected behind apparent ordinariness.
The nice curtains that are drawn to hide a corpse on a rocking horse. That sort of thing.
But not so much blatant horror, rather the deeply unsettling sense of things being askew, unreliable, unsafe, and a little bit twisted.

Smashwords Interview

Who are your favorite authors?
Ian McEwan, Stephen King, Charles Dickens
Iain Banks, Lesley Glaister, Kate Atkinson
Edna O'Brien, Susan Hill, Julie Myerson
Barbara Gowdy, Mervyn Peake, Ray Bradbury, Patrick McCabe
When did you first start writing?
At a very young age; have always loved writing.
If not actually writing I was usually creating stories to tell my sister. Luckily, she liked listening.
And if not doing either of those, I was always making up stories in my head. Still do.
An overheard snippet of conversation is often all it takes...
Read more of this interview.

Where to find Caroline Wood online


Books

The At Least Game
Price: $2.99 USD. (Free!) Words: 42,850. Language: English. Published: August 31, 2017. Categories: Fiction » Thriller & suspense » Psychological thriller
(5.00)
A family. A secret. An unlikely reappearance from the past. And a killing. Who would shatter the dullness of a quiet cul-de-sac like this? And why?
Grave Misgivings
Price: $0.99 USD. Words: 80,490. Language: English. Published: April 10, 2015. Categories: Fiction » Horror » General
(5.00)
Like short stories to leave a mark, stay in your mind long after you've finished reading? These dark, off-kilter tales will worm their way into your thoughts. Will make you laugh, cry, shiver and squirm. Here, ordinary people lead far from run-of-the-mill lives, but you'd never guess until you look behind closed doors. And you'll never look at discarded shoes the same way again...
Noah Quince
Price: $0.99 USD. Words: 92,610. Language: English. Published: April 10, 2015. Categories: Fiction » Horror » General
(5.00)
What the hell's in the cupboard under the stairs? Why does the neighbour always wear an apron? You're unlikely to meet anyone as hideous as Noah Quince, but somehow he'll get under your skin, make you wonder why he's so vile. This deeply dark, comic novel tells the story of a man unravelling into madness, and explores the power of obsession.

Caroline Wood's tag cloud

Caroline Wood's favorite authors on Smashwords


Smashwords book reviews by Caroline Wood

  • Kamikaze Trinitrotoluene on May 11, 2015

    Short and funny, Kamikaze Trinitrotoluene is a well choreographed, visual tale of epic schadenfreude. Good fun and enjoyable - this would be great performed by someone like Lee Evans perhaps. Someone who can talk really fast, building up to the ending. Will read Lee. A Jackson's other books.
  • A Reckless Moon on May 11, 2015

    A quick bite of a story, with much conveyed in few words and short sentences that work well to add tension. The scene is set with just enough detail to enable the imagination to do the rest, and the main character has an elegance fitting for an ancient and discerning vampire. He's after more than just blood... Really enjoyed this and it's a great taster for Linda Arditto's other books, which I look forward to reading.
  • The Awakening of Adam Capello on June 04, 2015

    The Awakening of Adam Capello by M W Taylor Fascinating subject for a book - looking at multiple previous existences and entering the mind, experience and environment of other lives previously lived by the main protagonist, Adam Capello. The subject is a bit like writing itself - inhabiting other characters and lives to provide a glimpse into their thoughts and feelings. This thought-provoking book raises some big questions, particularly around what it is to be human, how we interact with each other (or not - with so many of us absorbed and distracted by technology). It explores a simpler way of living and asks if perhaps we've lost the capacity to recognise and appreciate this in our constant striving for diversions and stimulation. It's clear that the author has been doing some deep thinking, which is reflected in this book.
  • The Glassblower's Daughter on July 15, 2015

    The Glassblower's Daughter This is a wonderful book, exquisitely written. It made me laugh, cry and think. I finished reading it a few days ago and it is still very much alive in my mind. Feels like one of those books that you never forget - truly memorable, with a lingering, haunting quality. In a nutshell, it gave me everything I want from a book – it moved me, engaged me at a deep level, and took me to a perfectly created world that I believed in with characters that I cared about. Frances Clarke’s writing is an absolute delight to read; the period is beautifully evoked, her descriptions have a poetic element – I marked so many passages that I ended up with a scarf-length list of highlighted text. I didn’t want to lose any of these sparkling gems. Just a few here… “Afternoon darkness pasted the sky shut like an eyelid.” “Torch-light shone rose and gold on the trapezium of skin between his thumb and cantilevered finger bones.” “The windowpanes projected a hopscotch of sunlight onto the parquet flooring.” “…’Thank you’ rustled his cellophane voice.” “The soles of her feet no longer recognised the floor.” These and so many other gorgeous sentences in The Glassblower’s Daughter made me ache with appreciation, admiration and the pure joy of finding words used in such a way – they fitted into a place in my mind as if specially crafted. You know that feeling when you read a book, see a film or hear a piece of music that is so good you want to stop strangers in the street and force them to read, see or hear it too? This is one of those books. Give yourself a treat. Buy this book now and read it, read it, read it.
  • The Ball on Aug. 13, 2015

    Engaging and well written, The Ball has more depth than is usual for a short story. It has a lingering after-effect. Has made me want to read more from Jonathan M Barrett.
  • Cain's Apples on Aug. 13, 2015

    Great fun - a good old-fashioned creepy story and morality tale. Reminds me of the stories in the Pan Books of Horror or the Twilight Zone. Yes, predictable, but still an enjoyable read.
  • Blink on Aug. 13, 2015

    Deliciously chilling story. I like the way it's firmly planted in the reality of everyday life - making the weirdness even more striking. Also a nice twist on being scared of the dentist.... Really enjoyed this.
  • Crimson Dreams on Aug. 13, 2015

    The first few typos didn't stop me wanting to know what happened next. But I did begin to find the tense changes and stray words quite distracting from what could otherwise be a good read.
  • Delphine on Sep. 20, 2015

    I found this intense, claustrophobic, disturbing and frightening. A powerful and raw piece of writing, I felt I'd been allowed deep inside the thoughts of the central character. The detachment and numbness of depression are portrayed so well here that it's almost painful, though utterly compelling, to read.
  • Bargain Basement on Oct. 29, 2015

    Really enjoyed this atmospheric story. The main character was well drawn and the overall feeling was melancholy. Some lovely detail in this sweetly sad tale - made me want to know more.
  • The Collector on Dec. 29, 2015

    There was something of the quality of a fairytale in this story, which kept me reading. I like the idea of echoes and ripples reaching through time, and enjoyed the eerie atmosphere this brought to the story. Bit distracted by the typos but otherwise a good story. Thanks.
  • Closing Shift on Dec. 30, 2015

    What an absolute delight to find this story. The writing is wonderful. It can be a bit of a gamble choosing books on Smashwords...It's great that publishing is available to all but sometimes quality is a real issue. Not in this case, though. Cameron D. Garriepy's writing shines bright and clear. Loved it. Many thanks.
  • The Lily on Dec. 30, 2015

    I enjoyed this moving and memorable short story. It has a haunting quality that lingers beyond the end of the book. Thank you.
  • Quintessence of Dust on Jan. 23, 2016

    What a great discovery, so pleased to stumble across Craig Wallwork's collection of short stories. Very much my sort of thing, these stories are strange, disturbing, alarming and compelling. Can't think of anything similar-you really have to read these for yourself to get an idea of how much they veer from run of the mill... Although I'm not keen on gory or obvious horror, preferring psychological, atmosphere and underlying unease, these stories still captured my imagination. They work on several levels, with more to them than the surface and obvious layer. It may sound unlikely but there is tenderness here, amid all the harsh, grotesque and potentially offensive stuff. These stories confirm my long-held belief that a good writer can write about anything. Or, put the other way round, good writing can make anything worth reading. This is certainly a good writer. If you want to be challenged, moved, have your thoughts provoked, read Quintessence of Dust.
  • The Crawling on Feb. 11, 2016

    Another dark and disturbing story from Lee A. Jackson. It deals with interesting subjects of image, the superficial nature of appearance and the deeper internal impact of wanting to be noticed. In an age when cosmetic surgery seems 'normal', commonplace and easily accessible, this digs a lot deeper and really makes you think. It gets under the skin, which is always a good thing with fiction as far as I'm concerned.
  • Dreaming Falling Down on Feb. 11, 2016

    Made me shudder... What a tormented existence for Abraham, the main character. There is a sense of being trapped, of hopelessness and dread. Playing a tiny part in a huge unknown and unexplained activity where one is not meant to question but just keep carrying out the same role... This really is the stuff of nightmares. Looked at another way, it also made me think of the daily grind for anyone working in a vast, depersonalised organisation, where they must just keep repeating the same thing and never stop to wonder what they are actually doing... Chilling stuff.
  • You Are Just A Guest on March 01, 2016

    Really enjoyable short story. The format works well (blog posts and Twitter posts) and I liked the contrast between the husband and wife's comments. Tense, fast-paced and chilling - all good ingredients for a horror story. Many thanks
  • Bloom on May 27, 2017

    Like all good stories, this short piece works on different levels. There's a fable or fairytale quality to the idea of discovering something much desired, and which carries a high price for ownership. At another level, the story made me think of the must-have-at-any-cost consumerism we accept as normality. And the blind willingness to destroy what we need. Perhaps I'm reading too far beyond the surface of the story, but I felt it portrayed human greed in a chilling way.
  • Nick on Aug. 21, 2017

    Really enjoyed this - it hooked me in and kept me reading. Well written and compelling, and certainly one that sticks in the memory. Now want to read more of this authors work. Thanks for a great story.
  • Nut Stuffing on Sep. 01, 2017

    Christmas. Families. Need to say more? This is both funny and painful and will strike a chord with many readers.
  • Tapping at Twilight on Sep. 01, 2017

    A delicious short story. Wonderful atmosphere evoked by writing that reminded me of Pan Horror and Ghost stories. A real treat and one to read by the fire in the depths of winter...
  • Empty on Sep. 03, 2017

    A well-written and moving story, capturing a strong sense of a harsh environment. Really enjoyed it. Thank you.
  • A Grand Folly: Or, The Ultracrepidarians on Oct. 11, 2017

    I write this review as an ultracrepidarian... At first, I found the ornate, flamboyant language a barrier but something made me continue reading, and I'm pleased that I did. This is a delicious, well-written treat. Keep a dictionary at hand as you read and you'll discover some wonderful words. The characters are vivid, the imagery rich, and the language, especially, something to be savoured. Not, perhaps, everyday fare, but a special feast, filled with delights and extravagant flavours.