Anne Selby

Biography

About the Author

Anne Selby became interested and then wholly fascinated by the subject of the myth of fallen angels or Grigori as they are often known, a number of years after being discharged from the British Army at end of eleven years of service and after the first Gulf War in June 1991. Her enthusiasm for the subject and five years of research resulted in her first book published in 2011 which contains the story of Semjaza and deals with the aftermath of the fall from grace of him and his two hundred followers.

Anne was born in South Shields, County Durham, in the United Kingdom in March 1951 and was brought up and schooled in Cape Town, South Africa. She now lives with her eldest son Lee and her cat, Rumble, in the south east of England and has one other son Peter, a daughter in law Christina and one grandson, Jack.

She loves cooking, reading and travelling the world, but is never happier than when she is sitting writing. She also loves to play Massive Multi-player Online role playing games like Star Wars The Old Republic and Lord of the Rings Online.

The Serpent and the Peacock is her first novel in the Semjaza series. The sequel, The Paths of the Moon, the second in the Semjaza series will be published in the latter half of 2013.

Where to find Anne Selby online

Website: http://www.aselby.co.uk
Twitter: @Shemjaza
Facebook: Facebook profile

Where to buy in print


Books

The Serpent and the Peacock
Price: $1.99 USD. Words: 244,390. Language: British English. Published: May 17, 2013. Categories: Fiction » Mystery & detective » General, Fiction » Thriller & suspense » Action & suspense
Ritual murder,” Eve thought irritably as she trudged after her new boss, Detective Chief Inspector Hamilton. “That’s all I bloody need. Angels in my private life, demons and black magic in my professional life. Why does everything have to be so damn complicated? It can’t just be a normal sort of murder, it has to have occult connections.”

Anne Selby's tag cloud

eden    grigori    semjaza    sumerian myths