Thea Gregory

Biography

Born and raised in rural western Quebec, Thea Gregory moved to the big city at 17 to attend college. She has had an eclectic career ever since, and has studied computer networking and physics and worked in technical support, sales, and teaching. She presently lives in Montreal, Quebec. Thea enjoys zombies, cycling, reading, walking, cooking and dreaming up twisted scenarios for future projects.

Where to find Thea Gregory online


Books

This member has not published any books.

Smashwords book reviews by Thea Gregory

  • The Hunter on July 02, 2011

    This book was very enjoyable, I found it held my attention, moved quickly but was never confusing and it was a very refreshing take on the superhero genre as a whole.
  • Shero on Aug. 01, 2012

    I was asked a while back to give my thoughts on Shero, a superhero-themed story with a twist by Jack Wallen. I found it to be a great example of envelope pushing fiction, and I think the world needs way more Shero. Now, I have to prove that statement. Shero is a transgendered superhero. He rocks fighting crime and the forces of V.I.L.E. in heels and a dress, with his katana and fingernail shooting superpower. He's open about who he is, even if the public doesn't understand, they love him anyways. Shero is a multifaceted character, and he has a log of inner doubts, questions and frustrations. He doesn't lead the perfect, idealized superhero life, which makes him a very sympathetic character. You want to cheer for him. He's lovable, entertaining and misunderstood. But, just like how gender is actually a shade of grey rather than an oppressive black and white, so are good and evil. Jack Wallen takes the concepts of hero and villain and mixes them around, until you're not sure who is good, and who is evil. The plot is a war between perceptions of stark-contrast good and evil, and reality. It's a refreshing take on the subject, because most bad guys are defined as "bad" just because, and good is good because it isn't bad. The suspense and action kept me on the edge of my seat. Shero kicks ass, takes names and does all the things a superhero does, all while looking better in a fancy dress than I do. Various superpowers were unique, different and felt super while still giving action scenes that weren't horribly overpowered.
  • Shero on Aug. 01, 2012

    I was asked a while back to give my thoughts on Shero, a superhero-themed story with a twist by Jack Wallen. I found it to be a great example of envelope pushing fiction, and I think the world needs way more Shero. Now, I have to prove that statement. Shero is a transgendered superhero. He rocks fighting crime and the forces of V.I.L.E. in heels and a dress, with his katana and fingernail shooting superpower. He's open about who he is, even if the public doesn't understand, they love him anyways. Shero is a multifaceted character, and he has a log of inner doubts, questions and frustrations. He doesn't lead the perfect, idealized superhero life, which makes him a very sympathetic character. You want to cheer for him. He's lovable, entertaining and misunderstood. But, just like how gender is actually a shade of grey rather than an oppressive black and white, so are good and evil. Jack Wallen takes the concepts of hero and villain and mixes them around, until you're not sure who is good, and who is evil. The plot is a war between perceptions of stark-contrast good and evil, and reality. It's a refreshing take on the subject, because most bad guys are defined as "bad" just because, and good is good because it isn't bad. The suspense and action kept me on the edge of my seat. Shero kicks ass, takes names and does all the things a superhero does, all while looking better in a fancy dress than I do. Various superpowers were unique, different and felt super while still giving action scenes that weren't horribly overpowered.