Annette

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Smashwords book reviews by Annette

  • Edge of Escape on Jan. 09, 2011
    (no rating)
    Edge of Escape, by Debra Chapoton is the definition of a page-turner! As you start the book, a girl wakes up in the dark, handcuffed to a bed. She can’t feel the floor. She can feel the low ceiling. She doesn’t know where she is or what is happening to her. From then on, you can’t stop turning the pages. This girl, Rebecca, is very resourceful, and gives her captor, Eddie, a run for his money. Eddie was one of those “special” kids in school who bore the brunt of much bullying. He’s had a tragic childhood and a mother who didn’t know how to help him, so the reader has some sympathy for him. He’s always been “in love” with Rebecca and thinks he can win her over and make her love him. Disturbing, to say the least. This book is all about plot. If you like that sort of story, the kind where you can’t put the book down because you just have to know what happened, then this is a book for you. The characters are somewhat flat. The plot has flaws—things that make you think, “he never would have done that,” or, “she never would have gone there.” But, if you suspend some disbelief, as is often necessary in these types of books, you will be on the edge of your seat. Chapoton does a good job of using flashbacks to different periods of time to slowly reveal the background of the story and the motivations of the characters. There’s one thing I have to mention--about drawing the reader into the scene. I think this book could have done a better job. One thing that really bugged me through the whole book (and I know it’s a little thing) is that at the beginning of the book Rebecca and her friend are shopping. Her friend says “look at these. Aren’t they pretty? I have to have them!” (not an exact quote, but close enough.) She takes “them” to the checkout, and then decides I really don’t need “these” and doesn’t buy “them.” What the heck were they? Earrings? Necklaces? Bookmarks? How much effort would it have taken to tell the reader? It made me feel disconnected from the story. Put a few of these kinds of scenes together, and you can lose me altogether. Do you agree? Can you give other examples of little things like this that have bothered you? Anyway, the book was good. It’s worth a look, if you like a suspenseful, edge of your seat, plot driven story. Published by CreateSpace 244 pages Loaded onto my Kindle from Smashwords. Rating: 3/5
  • Dead Man's Eye on April 03, 2011

    Dead Man’s Eye is a dark and scary novella that may keep you up at night. Joanna has had a corneal transplant, and as she is waiting for a train to take her to her doctor’s office, she witnesses a horrible accident in which a man loses his arm. But, Joanna sees some type of dark shadow enter his body shortly after the accident. She runs into this man, Lincoln, at the hospital, and he is still shrouded in this dark shadow. Joanna thinks she’s going crazy and finally decides to tell her boyfriend, Stephen, and her doctor, but they are sure there is some medical explanation for her condition. Things get worse and worse for Joanna, as she sees her best friend killed and taken over by one of these demons. There are more and more people being taken over, Joanna is being accused of murder, and she’s the only one that can see what is happening. What can she do? How can she get proof that mankind is in grave danger? I read this short book in one sitting, and I must admit it really gave me the creeps. The plot is the driving force in this story; we don’t learn much about the characters. I felt, at times, that there was a lot of “telling” and not “showing” to move things along more quickly. If Jeffrey had made this novel a bit longer, with more characterization and a bit more development of the plot, I would have enjoyed it more. However, this story is worth the time it takes to read it, especially if you want some creep factor. This is an adult book—there are sexual conversations, some violent sex, and language, so definitely not for the younger crowd.