Amy Tupper

Biography

Born in Seattle long before Seattle was cool, Indie Author Amy Tupper moved with her parents to Paris, France for three years in the mid ’80s, where she attended the American School of Paris. While there, she had many adventures, like the time she became separated from her friends after a Bryan Adams concert and spent a couple of interesting hours hanging out with a hooker while her father got out of bed to come pick her up.

Having survived France mostly unscathed but highly impressed, Amy returned to the U.S. to complete her studies at an enormous high school in Northern Virginia. It was there, hiding in Creative Writing class, that she wrote her first book. With that done, graduated from Randolph-Macon Woman’s College with a degree in Communications.

Amy now lives in Morrisville, NC, working as a mid-career telecommunication professional. She lives with her husband, a nice man who wants to know what's for dinner, and two tween daughters who over accessorize. When not throwing a meal together last minute, writing, or knitting while watching TV, Amy attends as many alternative rock concerts as her babysitters will allow.

Where to find Amy Tupper online

Website: http://amytupper.net
Twitter: amytupper
Facebook: Facebook profile

Where to buy in print


Books

Tenderfoot
By
Price: $2.99 USD. Words: 96,710. Language: English. Published: April 16, 2011. Category: Fiction » Young adult or teen » Sci-Fi & fantasy
(3.33 from 3 reviews)
Tenderfoot chronicles one daughter’s coming of age story as she deals with the revelation of her family’s paranormal secret. It is the first of two paranormal fantasy novels in The Tenderfoot Set with a length of 97,000 words/ 350 pages.

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Amy Tupper's favorite authors on Smashwords


Smashwords book reviews by Amy Tupper

  • Sherlock Holmes and the Zombie Affair on May 20, 2011

    Sherlock Holmes and the Zombie Affair is a clever tale by Philip van Wulven that does not disappoint! A delightfully witty read, as a reader, I thoroughly enjoyed tagging along with Sherlock Holmes and Dr Watson on their latest adventure. I commend van Wulven on his use of tone and language to capture the style of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. A must read for fans of Sherlock Holmes!
  • Josie's Thorn on June 24, 2011

    Synopsis: Josie's Thorn is a wild ride of novel about a young woman named Josephina who is forced under sad circumstances to return to the place she escaped, her family's ranch in Utah. While sorting out the messy business of running the ranch, Josephina must deal with Jacob, the boy she left behind. Only now he is a man, and she can’t hide from the truth - as much as she hates it, she still loves him. But what about the ranch? Someone is sabotaging it and there are multiple people with motive. Luckily, Josephina has Jacob to help her put a stop to it and save the ranch in a dramatic conclusion. Josie's thorn will pain her no more. Review: This was a fast read. The characters spring to life early in the book, and the tension ratchets up quickly, building between them. The secondary characters of Esther and Charlie were just as real as the main characters. The author does a great job of using the environment of the ranch and its problems to push the main characters Josephina and Jacob to their breaking point. And the sexual tension was terrific. These complex layers of tension propel both the plot and the romance forward with surprise twists and turns. A very sweet story. I enjoyed reading this book.
  • Waking the Stones on Aug. 30, 2011

    Stone Song is a story about two tourists who meet en route to Glastonbury and inadvertently discover the use of a new technology used to shape crowd behavior. On a flight to England, opposites attract and Ty, a guy with nothing to lose, and Jen, a new age Goddess freak, fortuitously meet. But trouble finds them immediately when a riot breaks out and they overhear a pest management team discussing technology that may have caused the riot. Wanting to avoid further trouble, they head to Stonehenge where they have an odd encounter with an escaped circus elephant. Unusual events stack up as Ty and Jen tour the English countryside, unable to get in touch with a missing friend. Worried, they arrive in Glastonbury where they befriend Joe from the pest management company. Then Ty and Jen learn they may be the only people who can keep a dangerous new technology out of the wrong hands. Stone Song is a mix of thriller, soft science fiction, and cyberpunk wrapped up in a light-hearted tourist jaunt. Having been to some of the places Ty and Jen visit, I think the author captured the feeling of being on holiday and driving around the English countryside to see the sights. The colloquial dialogue captures the flavor of England as much as the description does. Then there's the tension between Ty and Jen. They are distinctly different people so it is terrific to see how they come together. Add in the premise of a technological development that could affect us all any day now, and the stakes rise. All in all, this is an enjoyable read.
  • Sherlock Holmes Investigates. The Case of Lady Chatterley's Voodoo Dolls on Sep. 08, 2011

    A First Rate Sherlock Holmes Adventure This Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson story finds the duo hot on the trail of a criminal who has stolen Lady Chatterley's Voodoo dolls. It all starts when Watson implores Holmes to accompany him to the horse races and they set off by train. Shortly upon arrival, Josiah Green requests they accompany him to New Forest where, Mother Lee, a gypsy, makes their acquaintance of Zungo, an African witchdoctor. Together they explain how the dolls came to be stolen and reveal the nefarious why- it's a plot against the Queen as a strike against the British Empire. Off Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson go! In this third tale written by van Wulven based on Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's beloved series, van Wulven flawlessly captures the tone and style of the originals. The action is fast-paced as the plot motors on as fast as the horseless carriage in which they ride. The clues are true to the period, as is the technology. Most of all, this story shows how van Wulven takes delight in these larger than life characters. For isn't it true when Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson sniff out a great mystery that "Dash it all Holmes, I suppose I will have to miss dinner at my in-laws tomorrow."