Anna Hess

Biography

Anna Hess dreamed about moving back to the land ever since her parents dragged her off their family farm at the age of eight. She worked as a field biologist and nonprofit organizer before acquiring fifty-eight acres and a husband, then quit her job to homestead full time. She admits that real farm life involves a lot more hard work than her childhood memories entailed, but the reality is much more fulfilling and she loves pigging out on sun-warmed strawberries and experimenting with no-till gardening, mushroom propagation, and chicken pasturing.

She also enjoys writing about the adventures, both on her blog at WaldenEffect.org, and in her books. Her first paperback, The Weekend Homesteader, helped thousands of homesteaders-to-be find ways to fit their dreams into the hours leftover from a full-time job. The Naturally Bug-Free garden, which suggests permaculture techniques of controlling pest invertebrates in the vegetable garden, is due out in spring 2015 from Skyhorse Publishing. In addition, a heaping handful of ebooks serve a similar purpose.

Where to find Anna Hess online


Where to buy in print


Books

The Ultimate Guide to Soil: The Real Dirt on Cultivating Crops, Compost, and a Healthier Home
Price: $8.99 USD. Words: 60,380. Language: English. Published: July 13, 2016. Categories: Nonfiction » Home and Garden » Gardening, Nonfiction » Home and Garden » Green living
With an emphasis on simple techniques suitable for the backyard gardener, The Ultimate Guide to Soil gives you the real dirt on good soil.
Thrifty Chicken Breeds: Efficient Producers of Eggs and Meat on the Homestead
Price: $2.99 USD. Words: 12,520. Language: English. Published: November 30, 2015. Categories: Nonfiction » Engineering, trades, and technology » Agriculture / Sustainable Agriculture, Nonfiction » Home and Garden » Pets & livestock
Many backyard chicken keepers are surprised to learn that they spend more on store-bought feed than they would have paid for eggs and meat at the grocery store. If you're on a budget and want your foray into poultry to save money, not lose money, your first step should be to select thrifty chicken breeds.
Pasture Basics: How to Keep the Grass Green and Your Chickens Happy
Price: $3.99 USD. Words: 9,730. Language: English. Published: November 4, 2015. Categories: Nonfiction » Home and Garden » Green living, Nonfiction » Science and Nature » Animal husbandry
Do you want to enjoy healthy eggs and meat from chickens raised on pasture? Great grazing for chickens won't be found in the perfect pasture for sheep or cows --- you need to tweak your design to match a chicken's unique behavior and stomach.
Growing into a Farm: Before the Walden Effect
Price: $3.99 USD. Words: 18,460. Language: English. Published: October 26, 2015. Categories: Nonfiction » Biography » Autobiographies & Memoirs, Nonfiction » Home and Garden » Sustainable living
Anna's journey back-to-the-land was fraught with difficulties until she realized that the best partnership was a threesome --- a man, a woman, and a farm. Overflowing with photos, this book serves as a preface to the popular homesteading blog, Walden Effect.
$10 Root Cellar: And Other Low-Cost Methods of Growing, Storing, and Using Root Vegetables
Price: $3.99 USD. Words: 13,490. Language: English. Published: October 21, 2015. Categories: Nonfiction » Home and Garden » Gardening, Nonfiction » Home and Garden » Green living
The easiest way to grow your own calories is to focus on root vegetables like potatoes and carrots. But these crops need a cool, damp storage spot after harvest, which most Americans don't have in their homes. This book walks you through building a root cellar out of a junked fridge for $10, and also includes tips for growing storage vegetables and feeding them to your family and livestock.
Homegrown Humus: Cover Crops in a No-Till Garden
Price: $3.49 USD. Words: 10,290. Language: English. Published: October 8, 2015. Categories: Nonfiction » Home and Garden » Gardening, Nonfiction » Home and Garden » Sustainable living
Cover crops are an easy, cheap way to boost your soil's organic matter, to fight weeds, to prevent erosion, to attract pollinators, and to keep the ecosystem in balance. Learn about an advanced gardening technique simple enough for beginners in this photo-rich text.
Weekend Homesteader: April
Price: Free! Words: 9,310. Language: English. Published: February 9, 2015. Categories: Nonfiction » Home and Garden » Green living, Nonfiction » Home and Garden » Gardening
(3.00 from 2 reviews)
The second edition of the popular Weekend Homesteader series includes exciting, short projects that you can use to dip your toes into the vast ocean of homesteading without getting overwhelmed. If you need to fit homesteading into a few hours each weekend and would like to have fun while doing it, these projects will be right up your alley.
The Naturally Bug-Free Garden
Price: $3.99 USD. Words: 19,500. Language: English. Published: February 5, 2015. Categories: Nonfiction » Home and Garden » Gardening, Nonfiction » Home and Garden » Green living
(5.00 from 2 reviews)
Do you want to grow beautiful, delicious fruits and vegetables without poisoning your yard with chemicals? The Naturally Bug-Free Garden shows you how to bring your garden ecosystem into balance so that beneficial insects and larger animals do the work of pest control for you.
Permaculture Chicken: Incubation Handbook
Price: $4.49 USD. Words: 18,720. Language: English. Published: January 30, 2015. Categories: Nonfiction » Science and Nature » Animal husbandry, Nonfiction » Home and Garden » Sustainable living
(5.00 from 1 review)
Permaculture Chicken: Incubation Handbook walks beginners through perfecting the incubating and hatching process so they can enjoy the exhilaration of the hatch without the angst of dead chicks. 92 full color photos bring incubation to life, while charts, diagrams, and tables provide the data you need to accomplish a hatch rate of 85% or more. Hatch healthy homegrown chicks!
The Working Chicken
Price: Free! Words: 3,900. Language: English. Published: June 9, 2014. Categories: Nonfiction » Home and Garden » Pets & livestock, Nonfiction » Home and Garden » Sustainable living
Get ready for your new flock in thirty minutes or less with this short, sweet, and self-sufficient guide to keeping chickens! Learn everything you need to know to get started on your poultry adventure on a rural or urban homestead. Then enjoy a bonus picture book to inspire the next generation of chicken lovers.

Anna Hess' tag cloud


Smashwords book reviews by Anna Hess

  • How To Garden For Goats: Gardening, Foraging, Small-Scale Grain and Hay, & More on March 27, 2015
    (no rating)
    I should start out by saying that I've had goats for all of 5.5 months now...but that doesn't make me as inexperienced as I sound. Whenever I start a new project, I read widely before diving in, so I've worked my way through Storey's Guide to Raising Dairy Goats, Raising Goats Naturally, Natural Goat Care, and The Goat Care Handbook, plus lots of websites on the topic. I also resolved from the beginning not to feed my goats grain, so have instead been keeping them healthy on a seasonally varying ration based on grazing, hay, foraging trips to honeysuckle patches and oat leaves, carrots, alfalfa pellets, and sunflower seeds, plus kelp and minerals. Which is a long way of saying that this is the book I wished I'd had when I got started. Tate walks you through a widely varying array of potential feeds you can grow or collect for your goats, along with a list of what you really shouldn't be feeding to your herd. She included sections on sprouting grains and growing them all the way to "fodder" also, both options of which are both better for the health of your herd than the dried seeds if you must feed grain. Tate also offers advice on drying a wide range of weeds and herbs to make your own mineral mix, and even covers small-scale methods of harvesting hay. Overall, while Tate's short book obviously isn't the be-all and end-all on the subject, it's an eye-opening edition that should be part of your goat-keeping library if you want to move away from simply scooping up some sweet feed for your caprines to dine on each morning.