Annarita Guarnieri

Biography

Born in Trieste, Italy, in September 1955, I have a high school degree and a degree in law, but I started studying and using English at the age of 6, and chose to work with the two things I love most: books and the English language. Therefore, I’ve been working as a translator and editor for the past 33 years. On and off I’ve been writing too. I won a couple of non-professional awards and I’m beginning to publish a few things. My dream is to become a fulltime writer. I have a few projects in my drawer, but little time to work on them.
My first book, “Cats: Instruction for Use” – How to Survive being Owned by a Cat has been published in the US by Inknbeans Press and is available at Amazon.com.
Divorced, with two grown up daughters, I now live in the hills od Oltrepò Pavese (Northern Italy), with my 34 cats and my Belgian Shepherd, Shine.

Where to find Annarita Guarnieri online


Books

This member has not published any books.

Smashwords book reviews by Annarita Guarnieri

  • Kiwi in Cat City on July 07, 2011

    Reviewed by Annarita Guarnieri I must confess that I approached this book with a few misgivings, because I had not read anything meant for children in ages. But after just a few pages I had already forgotten it was a book for children, or at least I found out that I did not mind it at all. While simple enough that children can understand and enjoy it, the narration is flowing and the style elegant, clean and amusing. And the plot hooks you from the very start. The idea of children turning into cats and following their own (supposedly) domestic cat to a strange land and toward adventure is quite original in its own right, and the whole story develops with a steady rhythm, in the best mystery style, with a few surprises here and there. It was a very enjoyable reading, so much so that I’m now looking forward to reading the next volume of Kiwi’s adventures (a few threads are left hanging in the end, but the story is self-conclusive).
  • Second Chances on Jan. 09, 2012

    I found myself reading Second Chances in a period in which I had precious little time to devote to reading… and after the first few pages I was so hooked that I started carving out every possible moment to go on reading… during meals and even in the bathtub, something I never do for fear of damaging the reader! Today, I finished the book, and I must confess I did not read the incipit for the following book, Threads that Bind, because I want to be surprised and enchanted again by the dexterity with which Dannye Williamsen manages to bind the reader, both with the plot and with her fluent, rich style, full of beautiful descriptions so well calibrated that they become precious ornaments to the story without suffocating it. Another gift this book has to offer is the underlying philosophy of the eternal struggle between good and evil, faced here from a new, original perspective, that of two twins, parted at birth and forced by life along totally different paths. Is evil something we are born with? And is there something good even in the most evil person? These are some of the questions Dannye Williamsen addresses in her book, and while she gives, of course, her own answer to them, Second Chances offers the reader the possibility of lingering and pondering on the mystery of ying and yang, present in each of us, but that we often tend to ignore. Add to all this a plot that verges on horror in a very new way, which reminded me of Dan Simmons’ Carrion Comfort (for Darian has something in common with the “mind vampires” we find there, even if he uses his power in a very self-centered and distorted way) and you have the recipe for the perfect book to keep you company in a long and cold January evening! A five star book, no doubt!
  • Second Chances on Jan. 09, 2012

    Second Chances by Dannye Williamsen review by Annarita Guarnieri I found myself reading Second Chances in a period in which I had precious little time to devote to reading… and after the first few pages I was so hooked that I started carving out every possible moment to go on reading… during meals and even in the bathtub, something I never do for fear of damaging the reader! Today, I finished the book, and I must confess I did not read the incipit for the following book, Threads that Bind, because I want to be surprised and enchanted again by the dexterity with which Dannye Williamsen manages to bind the reader, both with the plot and with her fluent, rich style, full of beautiful descriptions so well calibrated that they become precious ornaments to the story without suffocating it. Another gift this book has to offer is the underlying philosophy of the eternal struggle between good and evil, faced here from a new, original perspective, that of two twins, parted at birth and forced by life along totally different paths. Is evil something we are born with? And is there something good even in the most evil person? These are some of the questions Dannye Williamsen addresses in her book, and while she gives, of course, her own answer to them, Second Chances offers the reader the possibility of lingering and pondering on the mystery of ying and yang, present in each of us, but that we often tend to ignore. Add to all this a plot that verges on horror in a very new way, which reminded me of Dan Simmons’ Carrion Comfort (for Darian has something in common with the “mind vampires” we find there, even if he uses his power in a very self-centered and distorted way) and you have the recipe for the perfect book to keep you company in a long and cold January evening! A five star book, no doubt!
  • Forsaking the Garden on Feb. 05, 2012

    Even if I love Susan Wells Bennett’s more humoristic novels (such as her really delicious Monkey series), I like even better her other works, such as Thief of Todays and Tomorrows and Forsaking the Garden. They have a depth, a richness that never ceases to amaze me and that unerringly manages to make a captive audience out of me till the last page. When I started reading “Forsaking the Garden” I did not know exactly what to expect, and the more I got into the story, the more it intrigued me. As usual, I won’t go into details about the plot, because I think this story, like many others, is a little gem each of us has to discover by him or herself… no spoiling, then! What I feel I can safely say, however, is that this is a book with a very original plot, masterly written as one could expect from Susan, and which affords many different layers of reading and many opportunities for some reflection. Is it better to live a life totally severed from the real, modern world, or to go into this world of ours and embrace it with all the good and the evil it has to offer? And, once we have “forsaken the garden”, so to speak, is it possible to get back and find the lost innocence again? Forsaking the Garden offers not only an intriguing, hooking plot which will not allow the reader to put the book down till the last page, but also allows us to look through virgin, totally unknowing eyes (those of Irene, the fourteen year old main character) at the world we live in, at our beliefs and at all the contradictions we take so much for granted, but that would smack of hypocrisy to those virgin eyes. A book to be read, devoured, cherished and that will give the reader a lot of very good food for thought. Definitely, a five star reading!