Christopher D Schmitz

Biography

Christopher D Schmitz is an author of fiction and nonfiction as well as a regular blogger. He and his wife have two children which are not usually up for sale. He secretly enjoys referring to himself in the third person (and coincidentally, his inner voice shifts to that of Bill Nighy whenever he does so.)

Earlier works: following completion of his first fantasy novel, he began to work on lots of short fiction in order to refine his craft and went on to publish many pieces from 1,000-15,000 words in a variety of genres as writing exercises. Putting fiction away for a while, he pursued post-graduate work where he received a new appreciation for nonfiction, and then returned to his love for fiction after that, churning out more novel-length stories at much improved rates.

Education: Schmitz attained a Biblical Studies degree and a Youth Ministry minor from Trinity Bible College in 2003 and went on to gain a Masters of Arts in Religion from Liberty Baptist Theological Seminary in 2014.

Other: he is generally known as a decent guitarist and played/sang in a rock band for several years. Schmitz is also an ungraded bagpipe player and has been known to pop up in random places and play them.

Where to find Christopher D Schmitz online


Where to buy in print


Series

Wolves of the Tesseract
The world is more than it seems. Werewolves, dopplegangers, powerful crystals, and sorcerers. At the center of it all: a royal family doing war through the eons against the nega-god--the ravenous Sh'logath!
Dekker's Dozen
The Magnificent Seven in space, as it's been called. Feeling like a blend between Firefly and Dark Matter, this high stakes space opera features steam punk time-travel, space ninjas, and really big guns!

Books

Wolves of the Tesseract: The Taking of the Prime
Series: Wolves of the Tesseract. Price: Free! Words: 570. Language: English. Published: September 5, 2017. Categories: Fiction » Fantasy » Paranormal
The prequel comic book to YA novel Wolf of the Tesseract. Learn more of the backstory of the evil sorcerer Nitthogr and his brother Basilisk. The comic provides an overview of the multi-verse, the wars spanning the ages, and leads directly into the events of Wolf of the Tesseract.
Willie's Bad Hair Day (A Children's Book for Adults)
Price: Free! Words: 500. Language: English. Published: November 14, 2016. Categories: Fiction » Humor & comedy » Black comedy, Fiction » Humor & comedy » Satire
(4.00 from 1 review)
Willie gets the sniffles and dies. The lesson is, well, I'm not sure...
Guide to Opening Kindle eBooks (.mobi) Not Purchased on Amazon
Price: Free! Words: 1,000. Language: English. Published: July 11, 2016. Categories: Nonfiction » Computers & Internet » ebook readers, Nonfiction » Computers & Internet » Hardware / handheld devices
As a writer/reader you might find read or share ebooks that have been saved in Kindle's .mobi format. (happens often when doing reviews for Amazon, Goodreads, or perhaps purchased 3rd party.) This step-by-step photo guide shows you how to crossload those files into your Android Kindle App.
Dekker's Dozen: A Waxing Arbolean Moon
Series: Dekker's Dozen. Price: Free! Words: 6,790. Language: English. Published: April 20, 2016. Categories: Fiction » Science fiction » Space opera, Fiction » Science fiction » Hard sci-fi
Spanning the planting of the Circle of Seven to the day Dekker Knight meets Vesuvius Briggs, A Waxing Arbolean Moon is an origins/prequel that fills in all gaps in the fractured timeline of Dekker’s Dozen: The Last Watchmen and functions as either Prologue or Epilogue depending on how you choose to look at it. Say yes to steampunk time-travel, King Solomon vs Asmodeus, and aliens in Akkadia/Egypt.

Christopher D Schmitz's tag cloud


Smashwords book reviews by Christopher D Schmitz

  • The Nefairyous Saga: Welcome to Lily Port on Feb. 28, 2017

    The first thing that I noticed on page one is that there is dialogue EVERYWHERE. In fact, it drives the entirety of the story. When it does break out of dialogue mode the POV suddenly reveals a kind of universal narration to help show the reader what he or she is seeing. Anyone who’s read my reviews know my disdain for use of POV beyond 3rd person. Then I realized that this blended 2nd person viewpoint comes from the author’s background as a software designer (it actually hit me because I was thinking of how much the story’s writing style reminded me of an old text-based video game.) I read the author’s bio before I started the book (I know—I’m kind of a freak like that, I guess.) That helped reconcile my POV qualms and enjoy the story. Without giving away any parts of the story, it opens in short order on a grisly scene and the apparent emergence of serial killer. It all takes on a very “Skinsaw Murders” kind of feel (in case you’re familiar with the classic Pathfinder module from Rise of the Runelords) but it’s not a fantastical setting. The story is more of a mystery and has a Choose Your Own Adventure feel, except that you don’t make any choices—although you still feel involved in the mystery because of the POV which makes the reader feel as if he or she is there (although I got a kind of Ebeneezer Scrooge vibe, like I was just an observer trying to figure out if Lincoln will ever catch his nemesis, the murderer known as Wishbone. You can check out more of my reviews (and books) at https://authorchristopherdschmitz.wordpress.com/
  • The Nefairyous Saga: Eye of an Outlaw on March 07, 2017

    Most of what I observed in the first installment of the Nefairyous Saga remains true of the second. OF course, this time around I went into the book with a mindset to embrace the 2nd person POV and look at it like I was in a mystery or a video game (thinking the old Myst series where the goal was to try and figure out the mystery through experience.) Some of the writing does flirt more with the third person POV in aspects (sometimes it seems like there is no limit to the knowledge we get as the reader. If I'd change anything in the series it'd be that--but it does help keep these stories as relatively short and perfect for the casual reader--kind of like choose your own adventure books.) Detective Lincoln (from the first book) is absent. I was fine with that. I really did think the author did a better job of worldbuilding and keeping the immediacy of the books events, well, immediate. There is some backstory, for sure, but less so than we saw with the Wishbone killer in book 1 and it helps keep the reader in the element, so the writing style certainly improves between the books. The setting is also improved--partly just in language and names which have a distinct foreignness to them (in the first book I struggled to stay in the setting as some things seemed too familiar at times.) I am glad to see multiple installments of something labled as a "saga" or series. Those of you who follow my reviews on my blog or via my author/reviewer profiles know that I'm irked whenever I see a novel proudly listed as "Book 1 in the exciting new series you never heard of and which will never see a second installment!" Make sure that you visit the Author's homepage and send him some love and beg for a new story if this sort of 2nd person POV immersive storytelling is your cup of tea.