Eamonn Murphy

Biography

I live in a quiet corner of England and write stories. I also write book reviews which appear on sfcrowsnest.

Where to find Eamonn Murphy online


Books

Fixing Forcalquier
Price: Free! Words: 72,170. Language: British English. Published: June 24, 2018. Categories: Fiction » Fantasy » Epic
When a Tyrannosaurus Rex from the Jurassic era and an American businessman from the 21st century are magically transported to mediaeval Provence they threaten to change the past and imperil the future. A celestial entity called the Fixer sends the sorcerer Orph and his wily assistant Orcas to sort things out and put history back on track. Epic fantasy adventure.
All You Need is Yesterday
Price: Free! Words: 4,050. Language: British English. Published: June 24, 2018. Categories: Fiction » Science fiction » Utopias & dystopias
In a Dystopian future London, desperate survivors of a nuclear war find hope when they discover a cryogenic facility where the best people from the past were frozen: heroes who could help them rebuild civilization. But to get to it and waken the great ones they must battle their way through hordes of deadly mutants.
Brigstowe Dragons 2: Return of the Black Magician
Price: $2.99 USD. Words: 21,020. Language: English. Published: June 4, 2018 by Alban Lake Publishing. Categories: Fiction » Fantasy » General
Kenric, the telepathic Dragon Master, must once again confront the evil sorcerer Kemshah. This time the Black Magician has abducted Kenric’s true love, holding her in exchange for the Orb of Orcas—a device of which Kenric knows only that the dragons have it. Kenric has three days to deliver the Orb. But first, he has to find out who has it, and somehow gain possession of it. And the dragons don’t
The Spirit of Mars
Series: Mars Station Beta. Price: $0.99 USD. Words: 5,460. Language: English. Published: April 12, 2018 by Nomadic Delirium Press. Categories: Fiction » Science fiction » General, Fiction » Science fiction » Short stories
Things are tense on Mars Station Beta. No one knows what happened to Station Alpha, and things on Earth are threatening to boil over and envelop Mars. In the midst of all of this, Wyatt Finch is about to welcome his 16 year old son to Mars, a boy genius who also has a penchant for troublemaking...
The Union Man...and other stories
Price: $2.99 USD. Words: 13,250. Language: English. Published: January 9, 2018 by Nomadic Delirium Press. Categories: Fiction » Science fiction » General
The Union Man and other stories brings you three stories from Eamonn Murphy. An interrogator (torturer) for MI5 is accused of a murder, a murder he couldn’t have committed, but where his investigation takes him will not only change his life, but it will forever change the world. Happy is a drug that has been legalized in England, but no one can expect the consequences of what that legalization wil
Choices and Other Stories
Price: Free! Words: 29,580. Language: British English. Published: December 22, 2017. Categories: Fiction » Fantasy » Short stories
Choices and Other Stories by Eamonn Murphy is a mixed bag of fantasy tales, many with a touch of romance. Inside you will find a builder who meets his match when he picks up a witch in a bar; A girl haunted in the Mountains of Mourne; another who discovers that the villagers in her new home have a strange secret. There's also brick eating worms from outer space and an 18th-century love triangle.
Arnos Hell
Price: Free! Words: 34,470. Language: British English. Published: October 15, 2017. Categories: Fiction » Fantasy » Paranormal
Bob Harding is a health advisor at an NHS helpline in a call centre built on a graveyard. One Halloween night, a disgruntled spectre locks the staff in and announces he’s going to kill them all. To save himself, his colleagues and his girlfriend Bob must overcome his greatest fear. A spooky supernatural tale laced with humour.
Five Little Horrors
Price: Free! Words: 13,930. Language: English. Published: October 3, 2017. Categories: Fiction » Fantasy » Dark
Macabre fiction in the short form here. These five little horrors include voodoo cake decoration, a dentist, alien vampires, human sacrifice and a fly, or is it the Lord of the Flies? Best read in broad daylight.
The Brigstowe Dragons
Price: $1.99 USD. Words: 18,760. Language: English. Published: September 12, 2017 by Alban Lake Publishing. Categories: Fiction » Fantasy » General
In old Brigstowe, capital of Wessex, King Tobrytan has fallen under the influence of the evil sorcerer Kemshah and no one is safe. Rich and poor alike suffer heavy taxation and anyone who protests is a traitor. The dragons who protect the city are helpless because Kemshah has stolen their eggs and they dare not defy him.
Consarn Christmas and Other Stories
Price: Free! Words: 33,540. Language: British English. Published: September 12, 2017. Categories: Fiction » Science fiction » Short stories
Consarn Christmas and Other Stories contains eight science-fiction stories by Eamonn Murphy which were originally published in Perihelion SF magazine and one extra. They feature time travel, robots, a Dystopian future and an alien invasion. This is over thirty thousand words of fun, readable SF in the tradition of the Golden Age.

Eamonn Murphy's tag cloud


Smashwords book reviews by Eamonn Murphy

  • Outposts of Beyond April 2018 on April 04, 2018

    I bought this issue because it contains a story by Mike Morgan and an interview with him. I’ve enjoyed a few of his yarns in the past. Happily, there is some other good stuff, too. ‘A Prophecy And The People’ by Beth Powers is a fantasy that plays with the usual tropes. The Bard is at an inn telling townsfolk the prophecy about a chosen one who will free them from the fire king’s rule. He will be of humble birth but a vision of a maiden will launch his career as a hero. It’s ‘Star Wars’! Actually, it’s almost every epic fantasy. This story develops a different approach to tyranny and there’s plenty of action. The background could be used for a novel or ten in which a man of humble birth rises to challenge the fire king. I hope not. ‘Kuro no Ken’ by Mike Morgan starts off looking like a standard fantasy, albeit set in Japan, with our heroine Igarashi Satsuki chasing an evil wizard into a huge graveyard. She carries her cursed Black Sword, the Kuro no Ken. If it cuts you once, you are doomed. Soon enough, the reader discovers that this all takes place a few years in the future, someone mentions the folly of Brexit, when magic has been unleashed on the world and is causing chaos. It’s the Age of Asmodeus and, in the interview with him, author Mike Morgan states that he has written several stories with that setting. This one stands alone just fine and the author, who lived in Japan for a while, gives it verisimilitude with plenty of Japanese words which you may not know but that make sense in context. I enjoyed the interview with Mike Morgan but that’s because we have a lot in common: born in Britain, comic fans, selling short stories to small press publications, not of the right temperament to pen a novel and bluffing one by doing a series or two against the same background. He’s a better writer, though. ‘The Turning’ by Lisa Timpf is about humanity being assessed to join an alien alliance. Camispe Alvar works with Commander Dubia on the job but doesn’t like him. She quite favours our species but Dubia is wary of our volatile emotions. They set up a special test for war hero Gene Taymor that’s based on an old Earth story. This would have pleased ‘Astounding’ editor John W. Campbell, Jr. because it portrays humans as dangerous critters that other species should beware. It pleased ‘Outposts Of Beyond’ editor Tyree Campbell because it has a dog in it. He’s a sucker for dogs. Writers, if you want to sell Tyree a story, put a brave and lovely dog in it. I liked this one but I’m a sucker for dogs, too. ‘Bellatrix In The Night Sky’ by Kendall Evans starts with the sky falling, not on Chicken Little but on a rich old going senile sculptor, who won a big money prize when he came up with a solution to the Sky flakes problem. This was ingenious and reads like Science Fiction with time travel and carbon filaments but has an unexplained hole in it. No one mentions the sun and that spoiled it for me. Stories of survey teams on alien planets are always welcome and that’s what Regina Clarke delivers in ‘Sweet Bells Jangled’. Karin heads up a group of disparate, realistic and interesting characters exploring tunnels lined with luminous rock that Earth needs. They work for a corporation: ‘Middle managers who had never left home or faced anything more complex than cutting a budget, at which they usually excelled.’ Good suspense with a satisfactorily scientific denouement and love thrown in. What more could you ask? The title is from Hamlet: ‘Like sweet bells jangled, out of tune and harsh.’ I wondered how many titles are taken from Hamlet and found this wiki page for more information, in case you wonder too: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_titles_of_works_taken_from_Shakespeare Sitting beside the stories is plenty of poetry with Science Fiction and fantasy themes. In fact, Alban Lake Publishing has a passion for poetry regardless of rhythm and rhyme. I’m a simple, insensitive soul so it’s not my sort of scene but if you like it, here be hordes. To sum up: if you like poetry, if you like decent, old-fashioned SF and fantasy tales of the kind that was published in the 1940s and 50s, stories not steeped in misery, stories with a beginning a middle and an end and characters you care about then ‘Outposts Of Beyond’ is the magazine for you and there’s a nice dog in almost every issue. Eamonn Murphy April 2018 This review first appeared on sfcrowsnest at https://www.sfcrowsnest.info/outposts-of-beyond-april-2018-ebook-review/
  • The Tulku of Titan and The Terror of Titan on June 17, 2018
    (no rating)
    This is a great little collection. Both stories take place on Titanville, a hydrocarbon processing plant orbiting Saturn's moon. For a full review see https://www.sfcrowsnest.info/the-tulku-of-titan-and-the-terror-of-titan-by-mike-morgan-ebook-review/
  • 3 of a Perfekt Pear on June 17, 2018
    (no rating)
    This collection features three stories from the mind of Daniel C. Smith. In 'Artemis One' a distress signal is received from the moon - but no ships have gone there since the 1970's! In 'The Proteus Effect' there's a mystery on Ganymede when scientists kill each other for no apparent reason. The collection concludes with 'theirownspace' a future tale of kids, cyberspace and disgruntled parents. Nothing is quite what it seems here and I was reminded of the classic SF stories by Philip K. Dick. For a full review see https://www.sfcrowsnest.info/3-of-a-perfekt-pear-by-daniel-c-smith-ebook-review/
  • Disturbed Digest December 2017 on June 17, 2018
    (no rating)
    An interesting collection of horror stories from this excellent small press. Disturbed also has a lot of poetry in it if you like that sort of thing. Worth a look. For a more complete review please check out http://www.sfcrowsnest.info/disturbed-digest-19-december-2017-emag-review/
  • Disturbed Digest June 2018 on Aug. 05, 2018

    As with ‘Bloodbond May 2018’, I bought ‘Disturbed Digest June 2018’ in the Smashwords summer sale for a mere dollar, so it’s good value financially. It’s good value artistically, too. The opening story is ‘As the Crow Flies’ by Lorraine Pinelli Brown. Set in the American corn-belt, it’s about Isaiah, a good ol’ boy who drinks beer and whiskey and slaps the wife when she needs it. Sara needs it often as she’s a weird girl who seems to prefer bunny rabbits and deer to him. It was her father’s farm. The corn is growing tall and nearly ready for harvesting when a crow starts to pester Isaiah. An atmosphere of menace was successfully evoked and the ending satisfied. This would have fit well into the ‘Black Feathers’ anthology I reviewed recently. The author should keep her eye out for a follow-up. For rest of review go to: https://www.sfcrowsnest.info/disturbed-digest-june-2018-e-mag-review/
  • Bloodbond May 2018 on Aug. 05, 2018

    ‘Bloodbond’ is a quarterly magazine from Alban Lake Publishing that features stories about vampires, werewolves and shapeshifters, though only vampires seem to feature in this issue. You are here: Home » GENRE » Fantasy » Bloodbond May 2018 (e-magazine review) Bloodbond May 2018 (e-magazine review) July 26, 2018 | By EamonnMurphy | 1 Reply ‘Bloodbond’ is a quarterly magazine from Alban Lake Publishing that features stories about vampires, werewolves and shapeshifters, though only vampires seem to feature in this issue. ‘The Blood, The Guts, And The Dirt’ by J.G. Formato is set in a future where there’s a Ruling Class and a Working Class. Faun, as they call her, is the ambitious girlfriend of the ruling chancellor’s son. It opens with them feeding off a donor and proceeds as a dynastic/political story. The premise of ‘Bloodbond’ seems to be that vampires can be put in many different settings. They are no longer lonely, aristocratic outsiders mugging people in dark alleys or seducing maidens. But that was such fun! ‘Side Effects: In Conversation With Senator Scott O’Connor’ by Allison Epstein. O’Connor is the Illinois representative to the American Hemovoric Senate and chairs the Energy Committee. He’s also a vampire and everyone knows. Agora Magazine sends Leah Goldstein, the narrator, to interview him. The story is mostly in the form of a transcript and the charm of the vampire as he dominates the hapless reporter is well conveyed. For rest of review go to: https://www.sfcrowsnest.info/bloodbond-may-2018-e-magazine-review/
  • Bugs in the System on Aug. 05, 2018

    ‘Bugs In The System’ consists of three novelettes set in an area of space known as the Void. After a somewhat mysterious prologue in which some beings are downloading their consciousness into robot duplicates, we move onto ‘Part One: Collective Revelations’. A crew of aliens are escorting a deadly prisoner back to their military base. Remmis Firehorn is of a species called the Furus, known for being angry and dangerous. The Captain of the Guardian Star, a transport ship of the Em’Qua Collective, is Kov, an Alkan who resembles an alligator and has a short temper. His crew are a tall blonde human woman named Samit and En’Kel of the species K’Pal, a quadruped five feet tall with plate armour and talons. As this adventure features both humans and aliens, we can assume it’s set in a galaxy far, far away. While passing a black star, the crew receive a signal which indicates there is a Swarm base nearby, far too close for comfort to the Em’Qua Collective. Swarm are insect creatures with a hive mind who enter the body of other sentient beings and control them, rather as a puppet master controls his puppets. This was a solid adventure story with a few good plot twists. For rest of review go to: https://www.sfcrowsnest.info/bugs-in-the-system-by-karen-otto-ebook-review/
  • Nano-Bytes on Aug. 05, 2018

    ‘Nano-Bytes’ is a collection of short-shorts by Daniel C. Smith which I bought because I rather liked ‘3 Of A Perfekt Pear’, his collection of long short stories. First up is ‘Macro-Virus’, an amusing tale about a grad student on an exploratory hike in Chaco Canyon, an important native American historical site with two professors of archaeology. They are hoping to make some new discovery about the vanished Anasazi people. The opening crisis is that their jeep is broken down in the middle of nowhere and their phones won’t work. The disrespectful first-person narrator made this fun and the idea behind the story was clever. All parents want to give their children every advantage in life. Currently, that might mean getting them a good education. In the future, as set out in ‘Real Good Looking Boy’, it’s expensive genetic enhancements. Ted Norris and his wife want only the best for little Davey and make huge sacrifices. When you get to the end of this story, you can see where the idea came from. An SF take on a perennial parental problem. For rest of review go to: https://www.sfcrowsnest.info/nano-bytes-by-daniel-c-smith-ebook-review/