Carma Chan

Publisher info

Born a California girl, raised by four older siblings while my parents worked their butts off providing for all of us, including the three babies that were born after me. My parents were restaurant owners. They survived two bankruptcies, the first caused by tribalism, the second by economic changes in their town. My parents loved us profoundly, every one of us little freaks. My Dad died on June 10, 2001, before the towers were struck. That sight would have broken his heart. He was the only one in his family who survived the battle and occupation of Hong Kong. He had to see both of his parents and all of his siblings die one by one due to poisoned water, starvation and lack of medical care. My Mom is still alive, she's turning 84 soon, and she knows we all love her and that she raised a fine bunch of bananas who feed the world with love and silliness. We are a long line of hard-working, honest peasants. Immigrants, all of us. Pilgrims on this beautiful, green and blue Earth.

Smashwords Interview

Where did you grow up, and how did this influence your writing?
I was born in Los Angeles, but grew up mostly in Utah. That had a profound effect on my writing because I was a minority in that crowd even though I was white. My mother had a Chinese last name and my last name was different than hers. The majority of kids in school were white and their parents were married in the Mormon Temple. I was part of a non-traditional family, not by my choice, but because my father abandoned his wife for another woman and left her with six children to feed, and she had not finished high school. So when she married a Chinese chef in 1966, it became obvious to everyone that my parents were divorced and there was a lot of stigma surrounding that. So, I've always felt like a misfit, and it's given me tremendous empathy and respect for underdogs.
When did you first start writing?
At age 12. It began with a love of poetry, especially freestyle poems like those written by Cummings. When I was 14 and in typing class, instead of typing what was in the textbook, I wrote a short story about sexual curiosity. My teacher found out I was typing something creative and told my English teacher, and she begged me to let her read it. I was pretty introverted--I had written 103 poems in 2 years, and had only let one person read my innermost thoughts. Eventually I gave in, because she seemed safe, and she became the second teacher who told me I should never stop writing. For many years it felt like a curse. Since meeting Professor Richard Walter at UCLA, I've grown to love this gift and feel honored to be part of the ancient art of storytelling!
Read more of this interview.

Where to find Carma Chan online


Books

Cerebus Film: An Epic Journey
Price: $0.99 USD. Words: 2,550. Language: English. Published: May 12, 2011. Categories: Nonfiction » Entertainment » Celebrity culture, Fiction » Graphic novels & comics » Comics
George Lucas, Dreamworks, and Paramount Pictures contacted the creator of this legendary graphic novel series, Dave Sim, to inquire about purchasing the movie rights, but Sim would not sell the creative rights to his work. Instead, he gave his blessing to a fresh, loyal, unknown face to write, produce, and direct the first movie. This personal Mount Everest story will inspire you.
10 Most Annoying Things People Say to NICU Parents
Price: $0.99 USD. Words: 1,910. Language: English. Published: November 23, 2010. Categories: Nonfiction » Parenting » Family tragedy, Nonfiction » Health, wellbeing, & medicine » Family health
(4.00 from 1 review)
On May 4th, 1992, Carma finally got to take her baby home after 73 days on an emotional roller coaster in a place that felt like science fiction. Surrounded by a sea of babies, most of them weighing under 2 pounds (1 kilogram), kept alive through surgeries, daily being needled, tubed, taped and treated in ways no parent wants their baby to experience.
Cerebus ~ Under the Aardvarkian Spell
Price: $0.99 USD. Words: 1,000. Language: English. Published: November 15, 2010. Categories: Nonfiction » Entertainment » Entertainment industry, Nonfiction » Entertainment » Celebrity culture
The victorious muse that spawned an entire industry of self-published comic books now blazes a trail for independent comic book movies.

Carma Chan's tag cloud

Carma Chan's favorite authors on Smashwords


Smashwords book reviews by Carma Chan

  • Captain Zap meets the disenchanted robot. on Nov. 13, 2011

    Existentialism and minimalistic genius. I love the contrast of profound angst conveyed with meager illustration. This is a gutsy move by an artist who grew up in the punk/grunge/metal era. I see why so many famous comic book artists have applauded this indie comic.