Catherine Astolfo

Biography

Catherine Astolfo retired in 2002 after a very successful 34 years in education. She can recall writing fantasy stories for her classmates in Grade Three, so she started finishing her books the day after her retirement became official. Her short stories and poems have been published in a number of Canadian literary presses. Her story, "What Kelly Did", won the prestigious Arthur Ellis Award for Best Short Crime Story in 2012.

In the fall of 2011, she was thrilled to be awarded a four-book contract by Imajin Books for her Emily Taylor Mystery series (previously self-published), and has never been happier with this burgeoning second career!

Catherine's books are gritty, yet portray gorgeous surroundings; they deal with sensitive social issues, but always include love and hope. They're not thrillers, but rather literary mysteries with loads of character and setting. And justice always prevails.

Her latest novel, Sweet Karoline, is a psychological suspense.

Catherine is also the author of the novella series, Kira Callahan Mysteries, Up Chit Creek and Operation Babylift. She has also co-written several screenplays with her film-fanatic children.

Awards
Winner, Arthur Ellis Best Crime Short Story Award, 2012
Winner, Derrick Murdoch Award, 2012
Winner, Bony Pete Short Story Award, First Prize, 2010
Winner, Bony Pete Short Story Award, Second Prize, 2009
Winner, Brampton Arts Acclaim Award, 2005
Winner, Dufferin-Peel Catholic Elementary Principal of the Year, 2002, the Catholic Principals Council of Ontario.
Winner, Elementary Dufferin-Peel OECTA Award for Outstanding Service, 1998

Where to find Catherine Astolfo online


Where to buy in print


Books

Uncle Tom's Gabbin' ... And So Am I
Price: $1.99 USD. Words: 43,560. Language: English. Published: December 28, 2013. Categories: Fiction » Anthologies » General, Fiction » Literature » Literary
Maybe it's the heritage, but Uncle Thomas Sullivan and niece Catherine Astolfo have always had a penchant for telling stories. Like their Southern Irish ancestors, their tales reflect both the light and dark of this world. Some of them will leave you laughing, while others will make you cry. All of them are a small slice of reality, exploring the human condition in its many permutations.

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