Christopher Eger

Biography

Christopher Eger comes from a long and varied background in both corporate and public training. Formerly holding the role of a Corporate Trainer with a fortune 100 company for several years, having previously worked for one of the top ten defense contractors in the country as well as being a onetime law enforcement officer and military man, he deeply appreciates the intricacies that interlink Global business and economic perspectives to any organization.

Christopher has performed and supervised incumbent new hires as well as current employees in the training delivery of safety, workplace violence, sexual harassment, circular interviewing, leadership skills, legal and liability issues, coaching for success, labor relations with and without collective bargaining, the art of customer service, workplace ergonomics, small team leadership, detailed mission planning, cultural awareness, advanced communications operations, preventive and corrective maintenance programs, Information Operations, workplace Counter-Drug (CD) Operations and other subjects as needed. He has extensively handled employee training and implementation of hazardous materials handling, fire prevention/emergency evacuation plans, safety awareness, life safety, facility safety inspections, accident investigations and air quality plans. He is a certified OC delivery trainer, hold four baton instructor certifications, is a scholar of Bartitsu, and NRA certified rifle, pistol, and firearms safety instructor.

While a corporate trainer, his Learning Services team was recognized as a Top 100 Training organization by Training Magazine over the course of three consecutive years. They were recognized in 2005 by CLO Magazine as a “Practice Gold Award” winner for “Achieving Impact & Leading Business Change” - He also wrote and collaborated with the Learning Services group to provide training presentations and materials. With his background in customized training initiatives, he is uniquely qualified to design and produce training materials and standardized best practices for your organization.

He is a modern hoplologist, which is a scholar of weapons and weapons systems. He has completed numerous military and factory Armorer’s courses to qualify him in the complete repair and upgrade of all light weapons in the US military inventory to include pistols, shotguns, sniper rifles, and machine guns. He has researched and extensively written on the subject of both lethal and non-lethal weapons from the ancient to the modern world.

His more than 400 articles and essays appear online and in print format with the Burda Media Group where he is under contract as the Military History Feature Writer. Christopher is also the head of military history writing at The Dark Paladin Bookseller, an Associate writer for History Times, the newsletter Combat Forums and the online magazine Helium. Pacific Radio News featured Christopher on air discussing subject of weapons systems and military history and a German language documentary on U-352 called in his assistance with research for their program. The journal Strike First, Strike Fast serialized his previous work. He also serves as a consultant and writer for Firearms Talk.com, Eye Spy Intelligence Magazine, Military Historian and Collector, and Warship International.

On his day job, he is a supervisor in the Protective Forces industry field to a contractor that serves as a security consultant to the US federal government.

He has published several short stories in previous anthologies. Last Stand on Zombie Island, Christopher’s first fiction novel, is set for release in the spring of 2012. You can follow his blog at www.laststandonzombieisland.com

You can email him at egerwriter@gmail.com

Where to find Christopher Eger online


Where to buy in print


Books

Thoughts on Firearms Tactics and Training
Price: $3.98 USD. Words: 45,570. Language: English. Published: April 7, 2012. Categories: Nonfiction » Sports & outdoor recreation » Shooting
Thoughts on Firearms Tactics and Training by noted firearms instructor, writer, and security consultant Christopher L Eger is a collection of more than 50 articles covering firearms training, tactics, interesting weapons and ammunition, and survival in a modern time. It offers fresh and unique perspective to help you survive and carry forward.

Christopher Eger's tag cloud


Smashwords book reviews by Christopher Eger

  • Mogadishu Diaries Bloodlines 1992-1993 on May 11, 2013
    (no rating)
    Take yourself to 1992, and the region of the world known as the Horn of Africa. There you will find Somalia. This once peaceful country with a history that goes back to the biblical days has degenerated into open warfare, chaos, and anarchy, where whichever warlord has the most guns makes the rules. This is where the United States, working under UN resolutions, sweeps in to save the day and the new novel, Mogadishu Diaries Bloodlines dives into headfirst. The author, Eddie Clay III, spent 21-years as a marine, and he writes what he knows. He served in Somalia during Operation Restore Hope/Continued Hope and he freely admits that portions of the fictional work are autobiographical. The book has the feeling that it was scratched into a green rite-in-the-rain will book with a skillcraft pen while the writer shaved with a K-bar. Don’t let the conversations involving chits and Space-A flights, or knowing the difference between S-1, J-3, CLP, or JP-5 trick you into not reaching for this novel. While Clay brings the Corps out in his writing, you do not have to have a bird, ball, and mudhook on your shoulder to easily understand the tale. Clay's hero is US Marine Corps Gunnery Sergeant Thompson, referred to in the work primarily as "Gunny T,” an augmentee to the Security Company of the I MAF as it gets ready to deploy to Somalia. The character is a likeable single-father and career NCO who relates the tale in a first person narrative that, while limiting in sweep, gets the point across. Gunny T and his sidekick strategic corporal quickly end up on the wrong side of an arrogant and overbearing company commander--, which is told with such realism that it reads just like a conversation with any active duty member of the military. Gunny T and company get their call to the Moog and find themselves in a world of anarchy, missed opportunities, military catch-22's, and the like that would seem to almost be dark comedy if it wasn’t for the underlying ring of truth to every interaction. Awkwardly trying to figure out the local culture, the hero has hits and misses in a one-man effort to win hearts and minds. As the work picks up pace, it runs into the inevitable combined arms land battle hinted to in the opening 'flash-forward' chapter that is told with great attention to realism that leaves the reader almost expecting to have to move piles of empty brass to turn the next page. A quick read at just over 30,000 words, Diaries is borderline novella in length. This keeps character development to a minimum but with the first person narrative from the eyes of Gunny T, this is nearly inescapable. This makes the work a great novel for anyone interested in an oft forgotten military history told from a personal level, and is basic enough in its telling to be approachable to readers of a wide scope. Bring your Kevlar.
  • Mogadishu Diaries Bloodlines 1992-1993 on May 11, 2013

    Take yourself to 1992, and the region of the world known as the Horn of Africa. There you will find Somalia. This once peaceful country with a history that goes back to the biblical days has degenerated into open warfare, chaos, and anarchy, where whichever warlord has the most guns makes the rules. This is where the United States, working under UN resolutions, sweeps in to save the day and the new novel, Mogadishu Diaries Bloodlines dives into headfirst. The author, Eddie Clay III, spent 21-years as a marine, and he writes what he knows. He served in Somalia during Operation Restore Hope/Continued Hope and he freely admits that portions of the fictional work are autobiographical. The book has the feeling that it was scratched into a green rite-in-the-rain will book with a skillcraft pen while the writer shaved with a K-bar. Don’t let the conversations involving chits and Space-A flights, or knowing the difference between S-1, J-3, CLP, or JP-5 trick you into not reaching for this novel. While Clay brings the Corps out in his writing, you do not have to have a bird, ball, and mudhook on your shoulder to easily understand the tale. Clay's hero is US Marine Corps Gunnery Sergeant Thompson, referred to in the work primarily as "Gunny T,” an augmentee to the Security Company of the I MAF as it gets ready to deploy to Somalia. The character is a likeable single-father and career NCO who relates the tale in a first person narrative that, while limiting in sweep, gets the point across. Gunny T and his sidekick strategic corporal quickly end up on the wrong side of an arrogant and overbearing company commander--, which is told with such realism that it reads just like a conversation with any active duty member of the military. Gunny T and company get their call to the Moog and find themselves in a world of anarchy, missed opportunities, military catch-22's, and the like that would seem to almost be dark comedy if it wasn’t for the underlying ring of truth to every interaction. Awkwardly trying to figure out the local culture, the hero has hits and misses in a one-man effort to win hearts and minds. As the work picks up pace, it runs into the inevitable combined arms land battle hinted to in the opening 'flash-forward' chapter that is told with great attention to realism that leaves the reader almost expecting to have to move piles of empty brass to turn the next page. A quick read at just over 30,000 words, Diaries is borderline novella in length. This keeps character development to a minimum but with the first person narrative from the eyes of Gunny T, this is nearly inescapable. This makes the work a great novel for anyone interested in an oft forgotten military history told from a personal level, and is basic enough in its telling to be approachable to readers of a wide scope. Bring your Kevlar.
  • Mogadishu Diaries Bloodlines 1992-1993 on May 11, 2013

    Take yourself to 1992, and the region of the world known as the Horn of Africa. There you will find Somalia. This once peaceful country with a history that goes back to the biblical days has degenerated into open warfare, chaos, and anarchy, where whichever warlord has the most guns makes the rules. This is where the United States, working under UN resolutions, sweeps in to save the day and the new novel, Mogadishu Diaries Bloodlines dives into headfirst. The author, Eddie Clay III, spent 21-years as a marine, and he writes what he knows. He served in Somalia during Operation Restore Hope/Continued Hope and he freely admits that portions of the fictional work are autobiographical. The book has the feeling that it was scratched into a green rite-in-the-rain will book with a skillcraft pen while the writer shaved with a K-bar. Don’t let the conversations involving chits and Space-A flights, or knowing the difference between S-1, J-3, CLP, or JP-5 trick you into not reaching for this novel. While Clay brings the Corps out in his writing, you do not have to have a bird, ball, and mudhook on your shoulder to easily understand the tale. Clay's hero is US Marine Corps Gunnery Sergeant Thompson, referred to in the work primarily as "Gunny T,” an augmentee to the Security Company of the I MAF as it gets ready to deploy to Somalia. The character is a likeable single-father and career NCO who relates the tale in a first person narrative that, while limiting in sweep, gets the point across. Gunny T and his sidekick strategic corporal quickly end up on the wrong side of an arrogant and overbearing company commander--, which is told with such realism that it reads just like a conversation with any active duty member of the military. Gunny T and company get their call to the Moog and find themselves in a world of anarchy, missed opportunities, military catch-22's, and the like that would seem to almost be dark comedy if it wasn’t for the underlying ring of truth to every interaction. Awkwardly trying to figure out the local culture, the hero has hits and misses in a one-man effort to win hearts and minds. As the work picks up pace, it runs into the inevitable combined arms land battle hinted to in the opening 'flash-forward' chapter that is told with great attention to realism that leaves the reader almost expecting to have to move piles of empty brass to turn the next page. A quick read at just over 30,000 words, Diaries is borderline novella in length. This keeps character development to a minimum but with the first person narrative from the eyes of Gunny T, this is nearly inescapable. This makes the work a great novel for anyone interested in an oft forgotten military history told from a personal level, and is basic enough in its telling to be approachable to readers of a wide scope. Bring your Kevlar.
  • Mogadishu Diaries Bloodlines 1992-1993 on May 11, 2013

    Take yourself to 1992, and the region of the world known as the Horn of Africa. There you will find Somalia. This once peaceful country with a history that goes back to the biblical days has degenerated into open warfare, chaos, and anarchy, where whichever warlord has the most guns makes the rules. This is where the United States, working under UN resolutions, sweeps in to save the day and the new novel, Mogadishu Diaries Bloodlines dives into headfirst. The author, Eddie Clay III, spent 21-years as a marine, and he writes what he knows. He served in Somalia during Operation Restore Hope/Continued Hope and he freely admits that portions of the fictional work are autobiographical. The book has the feeling that it was scratched into a green rite-in-the-rain will book with a skillcraft pen while the writer shaved with a K-bar. Don’t let the conversations involving chits and Space-A flights, or knowing the difference between S-1, J-3, CLP, or JP-5 trick you into not reaching for this novel. While Clay brings the Corps out in his writing, you do not have to have a bird, ball, and mudhook on your shoulder to easily understand the tale. Clay's hero is US Marine Corps Gunnery Sergeant Thompson, referred to in the work primarily as "Gunny T,” an augmentee to the Security Company of the I MAF as it gets ready to deploy to Somalia. The character is a likeable single-father and career NCO who relates the tale in a first person narrative that, while limiting in sweep, gets the point across. Gunny T and his sidekick strategic corporal quickly end up on the wrong side of an arrogant and overbearing company commander--, which is told with such realism that it reads just like a conversation with any active duty member of the military. Gunny T and company get their call to the Moog and find themselves in a world of anarchy, missed opportunities, military catch-22's, and the like that would seem to almost be dark comedy if it wasn’t for the underlying ring of truth to every interaction. Awkwardly trying to figure out the local culture, the hero has hits and misses in a one-man effort to win hearts and minds. As the work picks up pace, it runs into the inevitable combined arms land battle hinted to in the opening 'flash-forward' chapter that is told with great attention to realism that leaves the reader almost expecting to have to move piles of empty brass to turn the next page. A quick read at just over 30,000 words, Diaries is borderline novella in length. This keeps character development to a minimum but with the first person narrative from the eyes of Gunny T, this is nearly inescapable. This makes the work a great novel for anyone interested in an oft forgotten military history told from a personal level, and is basic enough in its telling to be approachable to readers of a wide scope. Bring your Kevlar.