Diane Craver

Biography

Diane graduated with a degree in English and Speech Education from The Ohio State University. Before writing her books, she was a schoolteacher and play director. She met her husband, the love of her life, while teaching at an orphanage.

She is the mother of six children and lives in southwestern Ohio. Her dream vacation is going to the beach. Her husband is supportive of her writing career as well as her awesome children. Diane writes contemporary and inspirational romance, chick-lit mystery, and women's fiction. Learn more about Diane and her books at http://www.dianecraver.com or read her blog at http://www.dianecraver.com/blog.

Where to find Diane Craver online


Books

This member has not published any books.

Smashwords book reviews by Diane Craver

  • Jonquils in the Snow on March 07, 2010
    star star star star star
    I enjoyed the beautiful and romantic story about Miranda and Brady. I loved how both characters listened to God. The jonquils symbolizing new life and faith was a wonderful touch to this well-written romance.
  • Surviving With Love on May 21, 2010
    star star star star star
    I enjoyed escaping recently to Canada, Idaho, and New York. I managed to visit all these scenic and action packed locations within a few short days. I know – it seems hard to believe that I could make these trips so quickly. I did it by reading about the thrilling lives of tracker, Stacey Parker and hostage rescuer, Cord McConnell. Rebecca Vickery writes about these two memorable characters in her book, Surviving with Love. Great secondary characters add to the richness of the story. You’d think a tough ex-military guy, like McConnell, could handle the petite tracker, but it’s a lost cause from the moment they meet. Both were hired to find two young boys taken hostage by dangerous criminals. Although Stacey’s tracking skills impress Cord, he’s also attracted to her physically and emotionally. Stacey’s a sassy, smart, tough and sweet woman with amazing outdoor skills. Even though Stacey doesn’t like Cord bossing her around on the Canadian trail to find the boys, she falls hard for him anyhow. Not only does she have to protect herself from the kidnappers, but also from her lustful and romantic feelings for Cord. The dialogue between these two characters is so much fun to read. If this book should be made into a movie, I’d cast Reese Witherspoon as Stacey. Of course, her hair color would need to be changed to strawberry blonde. A possible actor for Cord’s role might be Gerald Butler. He’s tough but compassionate at the same time. I highly recommend Surviving with Love, but only if you enjoy reading the following in a novel: explosive sexual tension between the hero and heroine, an action plot that keeps you on the edge of your seat, a developing romance between two strong-willed individuals, dynamic dialogue, and last but not least, feeling the experience of tracking criminals in a wilderness. I hope you read this outstanding book, you won’t be disappointed.
  • A Summer Collection on Sep. 08, 2010
    star star star star star
    Romance is the key ingredient in each short story with each author writing something different. Rita Hestand kicks off the anthology with a memorable and heart wrenching story titled The Far Side of Lonesome. It’s a Western historical that will warm your heart with how the heroine, Sarah, looks beyond the color of someone’s skin. She suffers so much at the hands of her own people and others. In spite of her tragic losses, Sarah perseveres in a most remarkable way because of her good heart and strong faith. Over the Coals by Laurean Brooks is a delightful inspirational romance. Rob Canter is an extrovert with two conflicting personalities around Jill Landis. In a crowd, he’s talkative and humorous, but he’s reserved and distant when alone with Jill. He seems to be hiding something from her. Even though Over the Coals is a novella, both Jill and Rob are well developed characters. I especially liked how the shy Jill came to life around Rob. It was also fun to read how newcomer Jill was extremely competitive and highly skilled on the volleyball court. To Make the Magic Last by Cheryl Pierson is a fast paced story with lots of action. It kept me on the edge of my seat. Police officer, Steve Cooper, runs into a gang war in his apartment building. He gets shot during the gunfire but manages to push his new neighbor, Christy Reed, into her apartment so she doesn’t take a bullet too. This doesn’t end the excitement because everything that can possibly go wrong in the building does plus there’s the continued threat of the gang, and the building collapsing. During many tense moments, there’s an enchanting romance between severely injured Steve and resourceful Christy. Laura Shinn pens a beautiful story of second love in Chances Are. Right away you know Katie Goodman is on the run because she’s hiding from her abusive ex-husband. She will do everything in her power to protect her son Byron from his father. Fortunately, Sheriff Trent can’t resist Katie, the lovely waitress when he meets her. She tries to diffuse his interest in her, but the determined Trent doesn’t give up on getting to know her outside the restaurant. It’s just a matter of time before Katie’s powerful ex-husband, who is also a judge, will find her and their son. Last but not least is Rebecca J. Vickery’s fun contemporary, The Trouble with Fishing. Lena’s boyfriend Robert signs them up for a five day camping trip. City girl Lena isn’t happy about going on this group wilderness adventure. Whether you’re an experienced camper or not, you’ll love reading about Lena’s mishaps and appreciate her attempts to become a better camper. Walker, the handsome fishing guide, finds himself attracted to the bothersome camper, Lena. The Trouble with Fishing is filled with many romantic scenes in the beautiful wilderness. I liked all of the stories and find it hard to make comparisons or pick a favorite. Each tale is uniquely different from the others and each one is good for that type of story. From western to contemporary to suspense, there's something for every reader. I gave a sigh of satisfaction after I read each story in A Summer Collection. If you like happy ever after endings about true love, you’ll enjoy reading the stories in A Summer Collection.
  • A Spring/Easter Collection Anthology: Sweet on April 03, 2011
    star star star star star
    Authors Cindy Carrier, Stephanie Burkhart, Markee Anderson, and Kate Kindle wrote delightful and heartwarming stories in A Spring/Easter Collection – Anthology: Sweet. Sometimes in an anthology, there might be one story that I don’t like as well, but this isn’t the case in this collection of stories. I thoroughly enjoyed each one and appreciated the variety. I’ll admit that I’m not a big fan of western historical romances, but Cindy Carrier won me over immediately in the story, Love’s Sweet Journey, with her characters, Juliet Chandler and Sebastian Tucker. Sebastian’s nickname is Stormy, which definitely fits him. His cousin, U.S. Marshall Everett Gibbs is taking him to jail since he robbed a bank. Everett is also responsible for taking orphans, seventeen-year-old Juliet and her two siblings to Denver. Juliet needs to arrive by her eighteenth birthday in order to collect her inheritance, so she can take care of her baby sister and young brother. Juliet’s heart beats faster around handsome Stormy, which causes her stress. She doesn’t want to fall in love with a criminal, even though he’s a kind and unusual one. Although Stormy is attracted to Juliet, too, he feels unworthy to even be thinking about her. Carrier’s story continues to cleverly include roadblocks to Juliet’s journey to reach Denver by the required time. This story is short, but it has a bit of everything – compassion, adventure, and sweet romance with a dash of excitement thrown in the mix. The second story, A Polish Heart, is a wonderful and fascinating read by Stephanie Burkhart. It’s a contemporary romance and the setting is the beautiful city of Warsaw, Poland. American architect Darrin Riverton is hired to look at the next plans of construction at the National Stadium in Warsaw. At the airport, he’s pleased to see his translator, Sofia Buraczynski, is a beautiful woman. He learns quickly that her beauty isn’t just on the outside. She has a depth of character and openness about her Catholic faith that is quite unlike the women his parents want him to date. Even while in Warsaw, his parents insist he return home for Easter. His mother wants Darrin to spend time with one of their superficial women friends for show only. Darrin’s soul opens to a newfound faith because of Sofia’s refreshing honesty and spirituality. Learning about Sofia and her family’s Polish Easter traditions is a nice addition to this story. Burkhart’s writing caused me to fall in love with Warsaw, even though I’ve never been there. Her descriptions of the setting and culture made me feel like I was experiencing firsthand Poland’s interesting country. Burkhart’s dialogue and romantic scenes make this story a page turner. Lilies of Hope by Markee Anderson is a contemporary romance with a big conflict right off the bat between third grade teacher, Alexis Jensen and Dr. Jasper O’Malley. School board president, Dr. O’Malley, walks into her classroom with no warning. After observing Miss Jensen teach for a few minutes, he angrily accuses her of unfair treatment of Caleb, one of her students. He explains that Caleb has a troubled and abusive home life. Later, he calls her to apologize but she’s hesitant to believe him. He invites himself to her apartment and helps her bake cookies. The phone dialogue and the cookie scene are fun to read. Jasper becomes enamored of the lovely blonde teacher while she doesn’t want a man in her life…not even the kind and good-looking doctor. After Caleb’s father kills his mother and shoots himself, Caleb and his little sister, Christy, have no relative in Mississippi to take care of them. Jasper ups his romancing of Alexis because he loves her and wants to get married quickly to give the children a stable home. Anderson’s a pro at writing fun and crisp dialogue that moves the story along at a nice pace. She makes a meaningful connection to Easter by her use of an old clay pot in the story. The children hold on to the pot of dirt because of their mother’s belief. She told them good things happen when lilies bloom from the pot of dirt. It represents faith and hope to the children. With Easter symbolizing new life in Christ, the pot of blooming lilies is a beautiful concrete example of God’s incredible love for us. Easter Promise by Kate Kindle is the last story in this anthology. Roberta Lannon is a woman with a big heart and moves from sunny Florida to Maine to take care of her dying aunt. Roberta’s past and present life seems to be dull, unrewarding and uncreative. Her former job was working as a lowly hospital cleaning lady. Now she’s devoted to her handicapped aunt, which turns out to be a permanent situation with little social life for the young woman. Aunt Vi doesn’t die as expected and thrives under Roberta’s loving care and attention. Roberta’s and Aunt Vi’s prayers result in some wonderful changes. A dream of Roberta’s causes her to investigate an unused greenhouse on her aunt’s property. The possibilities of raising vegetables in the greenhouse excite Roberta of what she might be able to accomplish. When romantic interest, Manley Rogers, enters the story, Roberta’s life is no longer boring but beams with hope for a bright future. A little girl, Jessica, adds another layer of richness to Roberta’s life. Kindle writes wonderful descriptions of the Maine coastline during March. I felt the rush of the seawater as I read her prose. An important message in Easter Promise is not to be judgmental of those with less than exciting jobs. God gives each of us important gifts and talents and how we use those blessings is up to us. Roberta lives her simple life more fully than people with so- called greater advantages. Easter Promise will touch readers’ hearts in a special way. I highly recommend A Spring/Easter Collection Anthology: Sweet for your reading enjoyment.