Donald R. Miklich

Books

1001 Sex Positions
Price: Free! Words: 24,850. Language: English. Published: February 9, 2017. Categories: Nonfiction » Politics & Current Affairs » Economic policy
The title is an eye-catcher intending to say people do not need or want excessive amounts of anything. This is relevant because the US economy has been sacrificing jobs to increase productivity, and such job losses are on track to get much worse. Workers are consumers. Job losses destroy their ability to buy, weakening the economy. An idea is presented for replacing these jobs.
Galileo's Balls: Did He Really Drop Them?
Price: Free! Words: 2,830. Language: English. Published: November 20, 2015. Categories: Nonfiction » Science & Nature » Physics
Galileo, it is commonly believed, dropped different weight balls from the Leaning Tower of Pisa to test Aristotle's claim that heavier one fall faster. But many historians say this is only a legend because the results which Galileo reported from such a test are questionable. This paper reports a modern demonstration showing these improbable results. Thus, the legend may indeed be true.
Deliberately Dumb: Understanding America's Education Failure
Price: Free! Words: 18,850. Language: Simple English. Published: August 12, 2015. Categories: Nonfiction » Education & Study Guides » Educational policy & reform / general
(4.00 from 1 review)
US students learn significantly less than students from other developed nations. Attempts to correct this by improving schools and teachers have failed because they are not the cause of the problem. Our students learn less because we Americans do not particularly value academic learning. Only programs designed to increase student motivation can improve this situation.
The Fallacy of Scientific Truth: Why Science Succeeds Despite Ultimate Ignorance
Price: Free! Words: 40,410. Language: English. Published: November 7, 2014. Categories: Nonfiction » Philosophy » Epistemology
Science knowledge is man's greatest feat and most powerful tool. But it isn't truth. This essay tells why not, what it really is and why it works though uncertain. It shows how the dogma of science truth destroys, and how dubious science theories cast doubts on genuine science knowledge. Last, it explains how the nonscientist can judge science claims for both theoretical and practical issues.

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