Mathew Bridle

Publisher info

A halo of soft golden light was falling beyond Shadow Hill.
That was all Mathew Bridle had when he sat down to write his first novel. Two and half weeks later The Rising, a 1980’s style slasher, was finished. Others would quickly follow in different Genres: 3 Phaze (sci-fi), Lagoon (sci-fi horror), A World Lies Bleeding (Sci-fi), King of King (Fantasy), Mark (incomplete sci-fi) until Emun of Mor (fantasy).

It was on a train journey from Manchester to London that Emun, a character originally from King of Kings, walked into Mathew’s thoughts and took up residence. It took a full year to put together the 155,000-word epic fantasy, but it was time well spent. Not because of eth quality of the work but rather the world that was formed. Emun of Mor was published by an indie press, Vamplit Publishing where it did nothing. It was hacked apart twice before it became Young Warlock in which time 5 years had passed, and his life-long love of fantasy had found a home.

Among his friends, Eric C. Williams a noted sci-fi author from the 1960s and ’70s helped to shape his writing with his depth of knowledge and story-crafting skills. Other writers too, from his local writing circle, helped to guide and structure his language and worlds. Without these valuable inputs, he would not have the skill he possesses today.

Writing has grown from a hobby to a passion, whether that is fantasy, history, screenplays or novels, so long as it is writing. He has a love of writing challenges, to be given a set of words and a random topic and 10 minutes to get started. He is a true believer that there is no such thing as writer’s block, after all, no one has talker’s block. So long as you have something to say then you have something to write; even if it is just jibber-jabber, isn’t that what the best blogs are made of?

Currently, he is working on the third instalment of The One Saga: Dark Mistress, Masterplayer – a historical spy story with Shakespeare and Queen Elizabeth, and Rain: a comic vampire noir tv series.

As Mathew likes to say, “As long as there are words, there is always something to write.”

Smashwords Interview

Do you remember the first story you ever wrote?
Long way back, when I in primary school, that would be about age 10. We were given a small porcelain ornament to write about, mine​ was Katy the Kitten. I filled almost 2 exercise books with a mad story of polar exploration.
What is your writing process?
Sometimes an idea railroads its way into my head. Others are inspiration while doing something else. So I sit down and plant the seed idea and just watch it grow as I write. There are times though when I'll grab a calendar and plan out the bones of a journey or a battle. Then I'll just sit and thrash it ​into submission.
Read more of this interview.

Where to find Mathew Bridle online


Publisher of



Real - New Testament
Price: $0.99 USD. Words: 213,830. Language: English. Published: July 6, 2010 by Mathew Bridle. Categories: Nonfiction » Religion & Spirituality » Bibles, Nonfiction » Religion & Spirituality » Bibles
This is literal word for word translation of the entire New Testament directly from the 3rd Textus Receptus.
Real - Psalms
Price: Free! Words: 53,860. Language: English. Published: June 17, 2010 by Mathew Bridle. Categories: Nonfiction » Religion & Spirituality » Faith, Nonfiction » Religion & Spirituality » Bibles
This is a direct word for word literal translation of The Psalms translated directly from the Hebrew Masoratic Text.

Series

The One Saga
A world plunged into darkness stumbles oblivious to the greater plans of gods and men.

Young Warlock

Price: $4.99 USD.

Fire Thorn

Price: $4.99 USD.

Books

Fire Thorn
Series: The One Saga, Book 2. Price: $4.99 USD. Words: 103,070. Language: English. Published: August 18, 2015. Categories: Fiction » Fantasy » Epic, Fiction » Fantasy » Dark
The struggle to control the lust of the flame deepens as Dekor attempts to unite the lost troll tribes. A dark power has risen in the depths of the Algid Range where the necromancers of Qtir first settled the southern lands. War is coming. The Great Prophecy spreads across the world unveiling its deeper secrets. Dark Blade calls for blood drawing the orcs of Azmabad into the spreading conflict.
Young Warlock
Series: The One Saga, Book 1. Price: $4.99 USD. Words: 101,010. Language: American English. Published: July 14, 2013. Categories: Fiction » Fantasy » Epic, Fiction » Fantasy » General
(5.00 from 2 reviews)
Fire is forbidden to mages, when Dekor sees the fire he falls to the lust of the flame. The way of the warlock is a path to darkness, not one for a graduate mage to even consider. "This will give you energy, it will also contain your lust for the flame. You must let your heart decide the path you will walk. Do not let anyone tell you fire is evil. Evil is in the heart, not the hand." Aunt Endor.

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Smashwords book reviews by Mathew Bridle

  • Pogrom on Feb. 11, 2011

    From the very start I loved this book. The quirky sense of humour which pervades everything from place names to events right through to myths and lore is reminiscent of Tom Holt, Terry Pratchett and even at times, Douglas Adams. With a sometimes quite cowardly hero, Curtis Kalashnikov, the Detective Inspector of the rudimentary Lodnun Police Force as its hero Pogrom sets about explaining exactly what the title is about. With me so far? Good then perhaps you can explain it to me. A pogrom is a nasty thing, the extermination of a people or race. History is peppered with such things from the earliest of times to the current day. The difference with the titular pogrom is that it is totally fictitious but nonetheless truthful. Someone is out to get the Hoplins, they want nothing less than to drive them out of the land of Lodzamonkeze. The mystery begins with an explosion at brewery which is blamed on the Yak’s milk drinking Hoplins. It then deepens with bombings of local pubs by the HERA, the supposed Hoplin freedom fighters. Further atrocities are attributed to the peaceable Hoplins until the city of Lodnun is in revolt. The mystery deepens and then shrouds itself in a veil of mist. Or hero is framed for the whole nasty thing and is cast into the Lord Prefect’s dungeon to rot out his days. That is until a non-existent dragon and a very pretty witch get involved with Kalashnikov and turn his already topsy turvy world completely inside out and then shove it in a sack and attempt to drown it. From here on the whole world of Lodzamonkeze is cast into utter turmoil right until the bitter end, which Clive Newnham sweetens with a dab of sherbet and just a hint of minty freshness. This is Clive Newnham’s first novel which he has self published at lulu.com, do not be put off by this. Pogrom is a superb story told in a gentle fireside tone with the lights dimmed just a little. Let the flickering flames of Clive’s dulcet tones draw you into the off-beat world of the Hoplins. You’ll soon be imagining the Dickensian cities and knights in armour battling dragons and the cloud boarding headless sorcerers as they all fight for freedom and justice and some fresh yak’s milk. Watch and smile as d’Earth scythes her way across the battlefields handing out life stories to the recently dead. Snigger and titter at the shenanigans of the endearing Hoplins then boo and hiss at the corrupt members of the secret services that would kill and maim for fine pair of stockings. The more I read this fantasy the more I wanted to read it. The story is well crafted with great dialogue with, as I mentioned before, has a sense of humour that permeates everything. Congratulations are in order Mr Newnham, I raise to you a glass of Yak’s milk with a resounding ‘here here, and bravo.” Long may the series continue.
  • The Heartstone Chronicles: Windchaser on May 27, 2011

    It took my quite some time to get into this book, but I am glad that I kept going. The story begins with a young boy rescued by a wraith which takes him and trains to be a Windchaser: a daemon hunter. Thus Darkmalian is formed. We are then jumped forward to the present day and a world about to be torn apart at the seams. One of the things that I dislike in novels is too much back tracking or history lessons, this book has too many for me. At the beginning of many chapters we are given another glimpse into Darkmalian’s past showing us how he was trained by the wraiths. All of these prologues are good on their own but it makes the story see-saw all the way through breaking up the smooth passage. Were all these pieces gathered together at the start they would make an excellent introduction to the novel and allow us to sail on uninterrupted. I mention this as my editor pulled me up for it. With that aside it is back to the story. Complicated. There are so many factions with tiers and traitors and double-crossers that come at you right from the start that it is difficult at times to remember who’s who. Much of the first half of the book is filled with this information which I am sure could be pruned (again I have done this myself). I always kept in mind that this long novel is the writer’s first and there are few people that have written novels without making faux pas. With that thought in mind its hats off to Mr Fraser for getting his vision down on paper and explaining it to us as best he could. Complaints aside there are many, many things that he gets right. Dialogue is superb. Each character has its foibles that come through as clear in their actions as they do in their speech. There is plenty of action; often gruesome and grisly, sometime breaking the boundary into horror. There is no doubting that Michael Fraser has a highly overactive imagination through which he has created his world. A world that he is determined that we share with him. There is one invention in this book that I truly love – the windcannon, a gun that fires charged bolts of air. As we progress through the story it settles down to a race against time. Darkmalian becomes the reluctant hero and must get to the fabled Heartstone before the daemon-gods. Cities everywhere are under siege by the daemons that are rising in ever increasing numbers and varieties beyond counting. In Lothos Par, the main capital, the daemons are after the Heavenstair to Shanduskala (heaven) here they are fought by Winchasers, paladins and all many of rogues locked in a final battle to be the last man standing. It’s all down to Darkmalian. If he can get the Amberchild (angel) to the Heartstone then balance can once again be restored and the daemons returned to hell where they belong. When all is said and done this a very enjoyable fantasy if not a bit gruesome in places. A very commendable first novel that is getting a sequel: Enchantersmith, which I shall be reading when it comes out. Complicated it is, confusing at times but in the end worth the effort a well fought for 3 stars and at $0.99 you have nothing to lose.