Bob Mustin

Biography

I have had a brief naval career and a longer one as a civil engineer, and have been a North Carolina Writers Network writer-in-residence at Peace College under the late Doris Betts' guiding hand. In the early '90s, I was the editor of a small literary journal, The Rural Sophisticate, based in Georgia. My work has appeared in various print and electronic journals. A story collection, “Collateral Damage and Stories,” was published in 2016.

Where to find Bob Mustin online


Where to buy in print


Books

The Blue Bicycle
Price: $3.50 USD. Words: 36,280. Language: English. Published: April 22, 2013. Categories: Fiction » Coming of age
Artie Royal has had a rough life and he has suffered more loss and rejection than anyone should have to bear. Still, he rises above the problems confronting him, and he does it with charity and grace and understanding. In fact, it eventually becomes as easy for him to push his concerns aside as it was at age eight to soar down Main Street on that blue bike, wind whistling in his ears.

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Smashwords book reviews by Bob Mustin

  • Seeds For Change: Education Reform in Context on Jan. 15, 2013

    Breaking Through the Educational Barrier In this rather short book, Dr. Little asks hundreds of questions, all hard ones, all prescient ones. Her project here isn’t to reinvent education per se, but ask what it will take to reinvent what was once the world’s most vital system of eduction. As adjuncts to her questions, she delineates a number of obstacles that will likely prevent the best answers: Erroneous assumptions. Resistance to change. Legislative meddling. You get the idea. Her belief here is clearly that U.S. education can be reformed from the inside out by expanding the responsibilities and impacts of public education to students, parents, teachers, and the communities at large. Still, her approach here is generalized, as are her proposed tenets for what must be done. Al the same they seem grounded in practicality, she a person who has been the gamut of educational experience, from student to lower grade teacher, to researcher. She espouses limitations - doing “what will work.” Performing valid scientific educational research. Working for the greater good of U.S. society. Expanding our idea of what is possible in eduction. What seems missing here is some notion of a strategic plan, so that her questions may take root in a focused manner. Perhaps that will be the subject of future works by Dr. Little.