Ivinela Samuilova

Biography

In Bulgaria Ivinela Samuilova is considered to be an influential, original and spirited new voice. Her writing style is easily distinguishable: intelligent, straight, witty, sincere and very refreshing.
Ivinela Samuilova was born on April 10th, 1971 in the town of Sevlievo, Bulgaria. She graduated from the University of Veliko Turnovo in Bulgaria with Master degree in Theology.
She has many other qualifications: in Journalism and Psychology among others. She speaks English, Spanish and Russian languages.
In 2009 Ivinela wrote her debut novel "Life Can Be a Miracle" that has brought an unusually optimistic breath of fresh air, as warm as a Balkan summer, to Bulgarian literature. But "Life Can Be a Miracle" is 'a book without borders' as it speaks to the universal human spirit. This is the right book for readers who want a fresh take on reality, who do not take themselves too seriously and who would like to explore their own potential and live a more fulfilled and satisfying life, starting from within.
Other books by Ivinela Samuilova published in Bulgaria (and soon to be released in English) are "If Life is Not a Miracle" and "The Woman in Search of Love".

Where to find Ivinela Samuilova online


Books

Life Can Be a Miracle
Price: $7.19 USD. Words: 47,150. Language: English. Published: May 26, 2013. Categories: Fiction » Literature » Literary
This novel has brought an unusually optimistic breath of fresh air, as warm as a Balkan summer, to Bulgarian literature. Yet, it has no borders and speaks to the universal human spirit. This is the right book for readers who want a fresh take on reality, who do not take themselves too seriously and who would like to explore their own potential and live a more fulfilled life, starting from within.

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Smashwords book reviews by Ivinela Samuilova

  • Drawing God? on Sep. 21, 2015

    As a theologian and a Christian writer, I always enjoy reading well written apologetic works on faith. “Drawing God” is short, and although somewhat threadbare in the way the ideas are presented, they do not lack depth. The dialogue between a young child (golden haired angel) who is busy making a drawing of God and a grave professor of science (at his death-hour) didn’t really prove God’s existence to me, as probably the author intended, but it reminded me of something important I have always been sure about: The only way to communicate with God is not through the bored, know-it-all, cynical adult that we often become, but through the child who has survived our serious growing up and still lives inside of us.