Jason Rapczynski

Biography

Jason Rapczynski was born in 1978 in New Haven, CT and has lived in Boston, Burlington, VT and the Maine Woods. He received his B.A. in philosophy and English literature from Saint Michael’s College and holds an MFA in creative writing from Emerson College. He has worked as a rare book dealer, a writer for a nationally syndicated radio program, and an instructor of writing and literature in the Connecticut Community Colleges system. He is the author of two books: The Videographer, winner of the 31st Annual International 3-Day Novel Contest, and MFA: The Novel. He currently lives and writes in southern Connecticut.

Where to find Jason Rapczynski online


Where to buy in print


Books

This member has not published any books.

Smashwords book reviews by Jason Rapczynski

  • Naughty Gras: Tales of Fat Tuesday on Feb. 13, 2013

    An eclectic mix worth checking out—for Jessa Callaver’s “In God’s Hands” in particular. Set in Italy during Carnival, Callaver’s tale calls to mind Poe’s “The Cask of Amontillado”—and while this work of erotic fiction may be about erecting more than a brick wall, the ending, like the final words of Montresor, will stay with you in a way that transcends genre. Following one particular climax in the narrative, the protagonist, Cassie, “Unwanted daughter of small town drunks.... College drop-out who’d come to Italy...just to become yet another man’s broad of the moment” has been stimulated to the point where “She could swear she saw stars.” “In God’s Hands” may very well have a similar effect on readers. Easily measures up to some of the better stories anthologized in THE BEST AMERICAN EROTICA during the 16-year run of that series.
  • In Gods' Hands on March 04, 2013

    An intensely satisfying read that draws you in to a picturesque world—vivid and strikingly graphic…“In God’s Hands” keeps you hooked until the very end. Set in Italy during Carnival, Callaver’s tale calls to mind Poe’s “The Cask of Amontillado”—and while this work of erotic fiction may be about erecting more than a brick wall, the ending, like the final words of Montresor, will stay with you in a way that transcends genre. Following one particular climax in the narrative, the protagonist, Cassie, “Unwanted daughter of small town drunks…. College drop-out who’d come to Italy…just to become yet another man’s broad of the moment” has been stimulated to the point where “She could swear she saw stars.” “In God’s Hands” may very well have a similar effect on readers. Easily measures up to some of the better stories anthologized in THE BEST AMERICAN EROTICA during the 16-year run of that series.
  • The Goat and the Heathen (2nd ed.) on March 20, 2013

    “The Goat and the Heathen”—a story many readers may check out on the basis of the title alone—is another gem from Jessa Callaver. This one begins with the visual hook of the protagonist, Aja, anxiously “Staring into the white porcelain hollow” (of her toilet), wearing an erotic costume—a “rib-constricting contraption” which makes her feel “like the new whore at a makeshift brothel.” As we enter Aja’s world, we find she has been dressed up by her roommate, Olivia—a promiscuous (or sexually liberated, depending on your point of view) sexy Southern belle, a femme fatale in the making…the type of character one might associate with hardboiled voiceover intros of private dicks in 40s noir. Olivia has surprises galore in store for her less experienced roomie—who’s initially reluctant just to remove the “I Break for Geeks” tank-T she wears like a security blanket over her bodice…. In what follows, Callaver skillfully makes use of an omniscient third-person to take the reader on a tour of the thoughts and sensations experienced by each of the three characters featured in this tale of a tripartite tryst. But this is by no means your average ménage à trois. There are descriptions of foreplay here that will stop you midsentence. You will go back and read them again. Indeed, the narrative itself seems a form of foreplay—aptly punctuated by a question mark after “The End?” It is a sign we’re left begging for more.
  • The Goat and the Heathen (2nd ed.) on March 20, 2013

    “The Goat and the Heathen”—a story many readers may check out on the basis of the title alone—is another gem from Jessa Callaver. This one begins with the visual hook of the protagonist, Aja, anxiously “Staring into the white porcelain hollow” (of her toilet), wearing an erotic costume—a “rib-constricting contraption” which makes her feel “like the new whore at a makeshift brothel.” As we enter Aja’s world, we find she has been dressed up by her roommate, Olivia—a promiscuous (or sexually liberated, depending on your point of view) sexy Southern belle, a femme fatale in the making…the type of character one might associate with hardboiled voiceover intros of private dicks in 40s noir. Olivia has surprises galore in store for her less experienced roomie—who’s initially reluctant just to remove the “I Break for Geeks” tank-T she wears like a security blanket over her bodice…. In what follows, Callaver skillfully makes use of an omniscient third-person to take the reader on a tour of the thoughts and sensations experienced by each of the three characters featured in this tale of a tripartite tryst. But this is by no means your average ménage à trois. There are descriptions of foreplay here that will stop you midsentence. You will go back and read them again. Indeed, the narrative itself seems a form of foreplay—aptly punctuated by a question mark after “The End?” It is a sign we’re left begging for more.