Joe Hinojosa

Books

This member has not published any books.

Smashwords book reviews by Joe Hinojosa

  • Treason's Choices: Seovann's Tale on June 20, 2012

    Great story about the power of words and choices, and the consequences thereof. It illuminates the shadowy world of political intrigues and the shows that even a seemingly common man may have a part to play in the greater political theater. I wholly recommend this story if you are a fan of fantasy, drama, and even love and loss. I enjoyed tremendously and I will enjoy reading it again.
  • Fall of Venus on Jan. 11, 2014

    What would you do if you woke up, and everything you knew had changed? The people you loved, gone. Your memory altered. You wake up in a strange place, not knowing how you came to be there. You immediately find yourself fighting for your life, and your best chance for survival comes in the form of a stranger, one who is in the same predicament. Fall of Venus by Daelynn Quinn, follows the events of Pollen McRae, a twenty-year old woman who finds herself facing the unknown. The story seems to be set in an undetermined future, as the world is facing the consequences of a global catastrophe, specifically global warming at an unprecedented rate. Survival has meant the forced relocation of the population into underground bunkers every summer, to escape the scorching temperatures. There is a war with a southern country, one in which Pollen has lost an older brother. She has also lost an infant child in the recent past. When she awakes at the start of the novel, Pollen does not know where she is, or why her clothes are in tatters. She is sore, scratched and bruised, and she discovers a tattoo on an insect on her face. Soon our heroine finds herself in mortal danger. As she tries to flee from her unknown assailants, she befriends a guy by the name of Marcus, who sports the very same tattoo. Like Pollen, he has no memory of how he came to be there. Their immediate thought is to survive. The world appears devoid of life, including animal and even insects. The only life they encounter is the band of outlaws determined to kill them. As they try to piece together what had happened, they find that most of the world’s population is dead. Her only family is Evie, a niece who is in the prison camp Pollen escaped. Pollen’s only goal is to save her niece, while dodging those who want to kill or capture her. Why were they prisoners? What happened to the populace? Could this be the first cataclysm which signals the end of the world? Is survival even possible? Daelynn does an outstanding job of bringing the reader into her story. You see a horrific landscape, scarred beyond recognition, beyond man’s ability to heal. There is love, but also sorrow of an unimaginable scale. There is selflessness, but also an incomprehensible level of greed, love of power and money, and possibly the desire for control, one with a reckless disregard for the sanctity of life There’s an immediacy in this book, as the problems that culminate in the story are horrifyingly familiar. Wars and the fears of a pandemic, environmental and climatological disasters are ever-present on our collective minds. We live with the pervasive greed of those in power. Could we be looking at our own future? I started the book not knowing what to expect, but I finished the book excited, impatient for the next one to come out. I have never read the final paragraph of a story and been more sorry to have it end. With a few words at the close of the book, Daelynn brought the whole of her novel to an exciting resolution, one that is poised to launch what promises to be an epic saga. I could never have guessed at the ending, but I gasped with recognition, marveling at the tale she created. More reviews at http://joehinojosa.com/book-review/
  • The Birth of Vengeance on Jan. 20, 2014

    When I began reading The Birth of Vengeance, I quietly wondered what the story was about. To begin with, you meet Jonathon Harper, a rather unremarkable young man, nearing the end of his school career, and looking forward to beginning college. His is a life which takes a turn for the worse when he’s becomes the target of a local gang of bullies and thugs, causing him to lose his one and only friend, and making him and his father flee his hometown for his safety. It isn’t until several chapters on that he meets Thorn, a beautiful and dangerous woman, held captive and forced to be the subject of government experiments, and oh yeah, she’s a vampire. Once he is able to free Throne, the real story begins. Vengeance, then, is another entry into the burgeoning, and I would say over-crowded genre of Vampire literature. So what makes Vengeance unique? We’ve seen vampires as heroes and we’ve seen vampires as villains. Thorn, at least in this novel, is neither. She’s content to be, to exist and co-exist, to feed and let live, only killing when she senses her victims mean to do her, and others harm. Not quite virtuous, but not entirely evil in a classical sense. Which is not to say she has a strong moral code. She begins to mentor the weak and pathetic Jon, teaching him, molding him to become a man, to fight and to stand up for himself. Aided with a serum developed by Thorns captors, which when injected, gives the injectees vampire-like strength and aggression, Jon learns to fight, and begins a campaign to seek revenge on those who tormented him. In the end, this becomes a test. Jon has to prove his devotion to Thorn, and his worthiness of becoming a vampire. The Birth of Vengeance is an easy read. Nothing remarkable about it, which is not to say it’s not worth checking out. It may not have the broad commercial appeal of a Twilight Saga, or the upcoming Vampire Academy, which in my book makes it even more appealing. This is not some lame, tween vampire romance novel. What it is, however, is a coming-of-age story, where the protagonist must learn to face his fears, to grow up and take charge of his own destiny. He is forced to make life-altering decisions and accept the consequences of said decisions, and I’ll admit that I felt a grim sense of satisfaction whenever he meets his former tormentors. Vengeance is a good, solid story, that should appeal to those who would like to enjoy a casual read. It’s entertaining, with some dark moments which are resolved in a satisfying manner. I wholly recommend you read it. http://joehinojosa.com/book-review/