Kay Ortgiesen

Books

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Smashwords book reviews by Kay Ortgiesen

  • For Honor: An Adventure of What Might Have Been on Dec. 03, 2010

    This is a good book. I liked it a lot. There were people in the story I could connect with and I really felt I got to know them. The story and action are interesting and fun with stubborn Laurel, who is a master fencer, and then her on-again off-again relationship with the musketeer, Aramis, as they try to find the spy who will betray France. It has excellent pacing and each chapter ends with just the right amount of mystery. I'm now reading the next book, Gambit For Love of a Queen, and am finding it, so far, another great read.
  • Gambit For Love of a Queen on Dec. 17, 2010

    It's really refreshing to read an author who can weave a great story from multiple characters' points of view. Orson Scott Card has stated that it is very hard to have more than one or two main characters and keep all their interactions interesting and unique. Kat Jaske has several characters all nicely developed and interesting in their own way, and they all present themselves as unique people. I loved Jaske's For Honor, and that's why I read this next book. Gambit introduces a great new adventure for the heroes, who must find and rescue the kidnapped Queen Anne of France. Laurel is gaining a little more control of her actions, and she even is accepting the fact that she might be in love with Aramis. But adventure calls, and they have to stay alive while rescuing the queen. Some of the heroes are injured, or captured or possibly killed and I felt the emotions of everything that was taking place. This is a great adventure to lose yourself in for awhile.
  • Rea and Kip: Part 1 of The River Runs Through on Jan. 21, 2011

    What a versatile author. This story is totally different from the For Honor and Gambit by Kat Jaske, which I loved. Yet, I really got into this story and found myself again understanding just how college students feel and the experiences they go through. Rea goes off to a small college and at first feels alone and left out, until she meets Kip and a few other people. At first, he is a friend, then a best friend, and then what?? It’s written in a musical, story-telling format so it sounds like you are just sitting there and grandpa is telling you the story. It’s a quick read, but you finish it with your emotions on high and the thought that, yes, college is just like that. Great story-telling. I liked this excerpt: "Solace and pity, you need no more of, dear sir ‘tis not your heart Kaira did sunder. Rather it was your self-confidence and pride." Thus it was to be kind she was cruel some have asserted; and to that maybe there is truth.
  • Magi on April 29, 2011

    As I started this book I thought what a great story this was going to be, and good story-telling. But the style changed. Richov and Alastor are attacked by assassins and Magic, and Alastor disappears. Richov, who was hiding his magic abilities knows now that his life is in danger and there is a great mystery. The story proceeds into more magic and lots of fantasy, but it soon starts losing this reader. The story is told more and more from a "thousand foot view" such as: "There was a great battle, thousands were killed and one of too many characters is now in big trouble." I didn't feel I could relate to the multitude of characters who appeared and disappeared throughout the story. The scenes were too high level with too many shallow characters and I did not feel any connection to what was happening. I would prefer the author show me what is happening rather than telling at a high level. Fewer scenes, but with more detail and character development would have held my attention better. This is probably an average fantasy story for fans of the genre. Give the sample a try and see what you think.
  • Dark Matters on June 22, 2011

    Brock Marsden is not your average detective, not after the genetic alterations, or the Torlian coffee that some worlds consider an illegal stimulant, and Brice doesn't like him. But, sometimes, extra help is needed to solve high-profile murders, and this is one of those times. And how many more will die before this monster is caught? If you like science fiction and a great mystery, you'll enjoy this story. Excerpt "You are not human?" "I guess that's a matter of debate. I think of myself as human, mostly. A Moreau is someone who has added DNA from other species to their own. . . ." Dyami's lip curled up. He shuddered. For several seconds he didn't say anything. Finally, his translator spoke haltingly. "You have modified your life-code?" "I guess you can say that." Another shudder shook his large frame. "How is this possible? Is it not a crime?" "A crime? Why? An individual should have the right to make their own decisions. If I modify my DNA how does that affect you?" "It corrupts your life-code! The sanctity of the code must not be violated!" Dyami shuddered again. "It is unthinkable."
  • Righting Time on July 03, 2012

    It's amazing the skill this author shows in developing her characters. "For Honor" was outstanding. Then came "Gambit", which made me feel even more that I absolutely knew these people. Now, this third adventure, "Righting Time", outdoes itself in making you actually SEE the movie and feel everything the characters feel. It doesn't get any better than this. You are a part of the adventure. And you are going to be traveling back in time to France in 1641. There you will try to convince Laurel and the musketeers that first, you are from the future, second, they must travel to the future with you to save the world, and third, you are not crazy. How hard can that be? Excerpt: "The very fabric of time that they could be changing by bringing these people forward, regardless of the need, was staggering in its implications. These thoughts, chaotic impressions and incoherent ideas rushed across the trained time travelers' neurons. . . . The haze of the portal dissipated. Laurel and her friends stood rooted to the spot. Sensations—pure sensory overload—assaulted the French people. A mind-numbing awareness seeped through them. Denial ripped at their innards. So much easier to continue that denial, to disbelieve the bevy of oratory and visual stimuli that bombarded them, forcing them to accept no alternative other than to believe in time travel." Time to find this evil Konrad, send him back to 1641 and then get back there ourselves, alive. What a story.
  • Righting Time on July 03, 2012

    It's amazing the skill this author shows in developing her characters. "For Honor" was outstanding. Then came "Gambit", which made me feel even more that I absolutely knew these people. Now, this third adventure, "Righting Time", outdoes itself in making you actually SEE the movie and feel everything the characters feel. It doesn't get any better than this. You are a part of the adventure. And you are going to be traveling back in time to France in 1641. There you will try to convince Laurel and the musketeers that first, you are from the future, second, they must travel to the future with you to save the world, and third, you are not crazy. How hard can that be? Excerpt: "The very fabric of time that they could be changing by bringing these people forward, regardless of the need, was staggering in its implications. These thoughts, chaotic impressions and incoherent ideas rushed across the trained time travelers' neurons. . . . The haze of the portal dissipated. Laurel and her friends stood rooted to the spot. Sensations—pure sensory overload—assaulted the French people. A mind-numbing awareness seeped through them. Denial ripped at their innards. So much easier to continue that denial, to disbelieve the bevy of oratory and visual stimuli that bombarded them, forcing them to accept no alternative other than to believe in time travel." Time to find this evil Konrad, send him back to 1641 and then get back there ourselves, alive. What a story.