Marc Secchia

Biography

Marc is a South African-born author who lives and works in Ethiopia with his wife and 4 children, 2 dogs, a rabbit, and a variable number of marabou storks that roost on the acacia trees out back. On a good night there are also hyenas patrolling the back fence.

When he's not writing about Africa Marc can be found travelling to remote locations. He thinks there's nothing better than standing on a mountaintop wondering what lies over the next horizon.

Africa is the inspiration for the Shioni of Sheba series (which is currently 3 books), a unique African fantasy adventure set in the spectacular volcanic wilderness of the Simien Mountains of Ethiopia. Growing up in Cape Town gave him a love of all things marine and salty, which led to the IsleSong series. The first book in the IsleSong series, The Girl who Sang with Whales, was published in October 2013.

Marc is currently working on the 4th book in the Shioni of Sheba series (The Sacred Lake) and finishing El Shashi, an epic fantasy about a man on the run from a terrible curse.

Where to find Marc Secchia online


Where to buy in print


Books

This member has not published any books.

Smashwords book reviews by Marc Secchia

  • Moonlight on May 25, 2014

    Moonlight from David Rose is a fine love story about second chances and the power of love over life and death. It's difficult to describe the plot without giving away several of the major plot twists, but suffice to say, the story moves several times in unexpected directions. It's told alternately from the perspective of the two main characters, Tadao (which means 'loyal') and Yuzuki (whose name means 'tender moon'). The imagery of the moon is beautiful throughout and is personified in the character of the moon who bathes the lovers in his presence. What I love about David Rose's writing is his ability to pack a great deal into a short space. This story is not quite novella length but it manages to feel real and substantial. I debated between 4 stars and 5, and in the end settled for four. The prose focuses almost exclusively on the characters and makes little use of the different senses, or backstory and setting (modern Japan, but I did not 'feel' it), and in the final analysis I felt that there was just too little to really move me to care enough for the characters and their situation. However I want to add that the story is well told and hangs together well. It's definitely one for the romantics! Most enjoyable reading and I thank David for providing a copy for an honest, non-reciprocal review. I will be reading this author again.
  • Dragonfire on May 27, 2014

    Now this was an unexpected wallop of fun packed into a short space. An excellent short story in which David Rose manages to throw several surprises at the reader in rapid succession. The characterization is also spot-on. An enjoyable take on the world of online/massively multiplayer gaming and a wicked twist right near the end. Enjoy!
  • Clouds over Planet X on June 28, 2014

    Clouds over Planet X hustles along at a lively pace, full of humour and intergalactic shenanigans. The aliens live among us. They are, well, suitably alien and not overly fond of earthlings. "Yon smiled, a rare disfiguring muscle cramp among their race." The bad guys are coming (a race of insects) to exterminate the nasty, useless humans. "Humans are insignificant vermin, infesting this galaxy at an alarming rate." What else? And even the humans are inclined to more than a little nastiness of their own. Stolen spaceships, rampaging aliens, morbidly hating telepathic sisters, boys and their toys, the obligatory mad professor and the mysterious Planet X all feature in this sci-fi romp in the vein of Dr Who other classics of its era. That's not to say this book is perfect, but it is partly about expectations. The tale is more about entertainment than great substance, and it does entertain throughout, with many plot twists, zany characters, near-death escapes and a satisfying conclusion. The comedic storytelling is particularly strong. The editing could do with a bit of picking at, but it's certainly nothing major - the plot hangs together well, the characterisation is consistent, and the jokes keep coming. Thoroughly enjoyable for a light, fast-paced read, I received a complimentary copy in exchange for an honest, non-reciprocal review.
  • Dragon Dreams (The Chronicles of Shadow and Light) on July 06, 2014

    Dragon Dreams, the first in the Chronicles of Shadow and light, starts with one of the best opening prologues I have ever read. "In my shadow you sleep, hungry for my soul. In my heart you live, nurtured and at peace. In my life you belong, always. The red dawn of war clashes with the tide ..." Throughout the book the prose is rich and lyrical, yet the pace never flags. The tone is overwhelmingly dark, a world at the edge of ruin due to an escalating war between two powerful dragons, yet there are moments of light-heartedness and beauty amidst the fires. Author Dusty Holloway has done a fine job of taking a fresh perspective on the Elves, Dwarves, Humans and Dragons of classic fantasy, and while there is a nod to old tropes, what is presented is fresh and well thought-out, each race characterised well, the Elves for example powerful and mysterious and very different to the Humans. The world-building is tightly woven into the story and never overwhelming or dry.The main characters are the Human Nachal and the half-Elf Auri. The story concentrates strongly on the two of them, with minor riffs played by the Dwarf Dhurmic (who breaks his friend Nachal's nose at one point) and the Elf Watcher Liran, who has a decidedly unhealthy interest in Auri and plays the third point of a love triangle between him, Auri and Nachal. I am not big on love triangles, I have to admit, but this one was very well written. If I had any gripes, it was that I felt Auri came across a little weak - I would have preferred a heroine less at the mercy/sway of events and personalities around her and more in charge of her own destiny. However that destiny is complex and confusing to her, and the plot pleasingly complex enough to make their characters intriguing. I disagree completely with some reviewers saying that Auri is 'undefined'. Partly, that's the point. She's only twenty-one in this first part of the series, she's discovering who she is, and mighty forces of inheritance and destiny are coming to bear on her life. She has two very different men vying for her attention and the fate of the world resting on her shoulders. All in a day's work, eh? All in all, this is a wonderful lead-in to series with great promise. A writer to watch!