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Smashwords book reviews by penwoman

  • Hostage to the Revolution on Aug. 28, 2017

    After the love of Countess Bettina Jonquiere’s life, Everett, is presumed lost at sea, she goes to Louisana, ruled by the Spanish, with Everett’s nephew and her children. In this rags to riches novel, Bettina hopes to be reunited with her mother in New Orleans, whom she hopes escaped from France before the revolutionaries sent so many people, particularly French aristocrats, to the guillotine. Even if she succeeds in finding her mother she cannot imagine her own future. Bettina despises her country and never wants to return, but she can neither foresee what fate will decree nor imagine any suitor ever filling Everett’s place in her heart. From the moment she arrives in America she senses someone is following her. She fears it is because her father stole money from the revolutionaries, who think she knows where it is and will stop at nothing to getit back. All that courageous, resourceful Bettina wants is in her own words “A home of my own. A clean place where I can have my own things and fill it with memories for my children. I have been so unsettled these last several years living in other people’s homes. Now I need something that is my own.” I congratulate Diane Scott Lewis on her meticulous research and her ability to bring the past to life without overwhelming the reader with facts. For example: “The sounds of banjo and fiddle, musicians on a flatboat on the river, drifted in through the window. The craziness of Carnival Season had started in January at Epiphany, with the exclusive masked balls in New Orleans. The flamboyant celebrating before the deprivation of Lent.” I look forward to reading this talented author’s next book.
  • Pillars of Avalon: Canadian Historical Brides on Sep. 03, 2017

    Books We Love dedicated this series to the immigrants male and female, who left their homes and families, crossed oceans and endured unimaginable hardships in order to settle in the Canadian wilderness and build new lives in a rough and untamed countr At Fort Quebec in July 1628, there is very little food and ammunition. Champlain knows he and his family cannot survive another winter. He intends to go to the fisheries in New Foundland although Protestants don’t accept Catholics. However, he is still relying on the arrival of the French Fleet which will bring supplies and settlers. Captain David Kirke, who has a letter of marque from King Charles I to seize all of New France’s settlements, wins a battle against the French fleet. He fills his ships’ holds with goods taken from it, decides to ransom the French captain and another nobleman, and to return the settlers to France. Four months later in London, David dines at Lord Andrew’s house where he becomes reacquainted with Sara, who is fourteen-years younger than he is. Throughout the novel, I enjoyed Ms Pym’s descriptions of people and places in England and Canada. The Andrews’ four storey house “is grand. Large windows filled with leaded lights twinkled in the sun and brightened the chambers. Finely worked wooden balusters took one to the living areas and rich panelling gave the chambers a warm glow. Their mantelpieces were decorated with gold leaf.” Ms Pym also captures London’s sights, people from every walk of life, the stink of the city and much more and paints superb word pictures of Avalon. Andrews and the other shareholders in The Merchant Adventurers are pleased with their investment. In Spring David will return to Canada to take the French colonies and make them English, but David and Sara’s parents arrange for them to marry when he returns. Reluctant to consent, he admits he cannot sail the seas forever. From the moment I met Sara in Pillars of Avalon I admired the clever young lady with a mind of her own. When her mother objects to David taking her to see his father’s fleet at Deptford she says: “We will do well, Mother, have no fear. After All Mister Kirke has subdued savages and French Roman Catholics. He’s crossed violent seas filled with Moor pirates.” One day Sara will rise to the challenge of single handedly managing her vast legacy of land and fisheries from David. While writing this fictional biography based on fact, Ms Pym gives the reader many interesting historical facts. In Deptford, David explains the stink is caused by the combination of pitch, raw wood, sulphur and brimstone to purify the interior of ships after long voyages. I recommend Pillars of Avalon the story of a husband and wife, who love each other, can conduct business alone or together, endure hardship and success at home and abroad, who are remembered today
  • Fields of Gold Beneath Prairie Skies: Canadian Historical Brides on Sep. 28, 2017

    BooksWeLove Inc dedicated this series to the immigrants male and female, who left their homes and families, crossed oceans and endured unimaginable hardships in order to settle in the Canadian wilderness and build new lives in a rough and untamed county. If you have read an enjoyed Little House on the Prairie and the rest of the series by Laura Ingalls Wilder you will enjoy Fields of Gold. De Montigny brings the past to life in this novel about her grandparents Lea and Napoleon who met in Belgium during the First World War. After she promised to marry him, Napoleon returned to Canada with the promise that he would give her fields of gold. He sends her the money for her tickets, and after an emotional farewell to her family she is reunited with him. I shared Lea and Napoleon’s determination to be homesteaders, build a house and raise a family despite obstacles. De Montigny brings past times to life in this beautifully written fact fiction novel. She is a talented novelist whose word pictures I enjoy. For example, Napoleon’s description of Saskatchewan. “It’s a beautiful place, miles and miles of flat land as far as the eye can see, and golden fields of wheat. And the skies like scenes from heaven – castles, cathedrals, angels, even animals.” This novel is a ‘page turner’. When I finished it I wanted to share more of Lea and Napoleon’s joys and sorrows during their long struggle to tame their land overcome setbacks.
  • Barkerville Beginnings: Canadian Historical Brides on Sep. 29, 2017

    BooksWeLoveInc dedicated this series to the immigrants male and female, who left their homes and families, crossed oceans and endured unimaginable hardships in order to settle in the Canadian wilderness and build new lives in a rough and untamed county. May 1817 Mr Edmund Hewitt. Whose voice Rose once thought was the most melodic in the world finsda her. He wants what he claims is his, their daughter. If Rose refuses to give him the child he never acknowledged, he will ruin Rose financially and let slip about her questionable morals. To distance herself from him Rose flees to Barkerville with Hannah. Five months earlier hard-up Viscount Harrison St John is about to enter an arranged marriage to save the family fortune. His bride to be jilts him at the altar. Harrison decides to go to Burkeville in British Columbia to join the gold rush. On her way to Barkerville the stage coach breaks down. Although Rose is suspicious of Harrison, who offers to give them a lift in his wagon, she is forced to accept because Hannah fell over and gashed her leg. From then on, fiercely independent Rose, who claims to be a widow, and Harrison’s paths cross. Throughout the novel Ms Westerling builds conflict, tension and word pictures. Rose hadn’t expected Barkerville to be “the jumble of wooden mostly single storey buildings tottering on stilts alongside a wide muddied creek. Surrounded by steep hills stripped bare of trees. The road through town was in poor shape, rutted and puddled with patches of drying muck. In consideration for pedestrians, raised wooden walkways fronted every building like pleated skirts.” This talented author captures the challenges and hardships faced by the miners and women who must to earn a living. Destitute and alone Rose has to forge a new life for herself and her daughter, a life in which Harrison seems to have no part.
  • A Town Bewitched on Oct. 24, 2017

    When I began A Town Betwiched I immediately wanted to satisfy my curiosity so much that I read until I finished it shortly before midnight. In de Montigny’s young adult fantasy novel, A Town Bewitched, I wanted the answers so questions. Who is the red-headed fiddler, who arrives in Hope a small town near Toronto? How can racist attacks at school, on Charlotte, (a Chinese girl, adopted in China by a white American parents) be stopped? Who is painting graffiti, including the one on the black marble tombstone of the heroine’s father? What is the disgusting significance of disembowelled birds left near the grafiti? In the novel written in the 1st person, de Montigny has captured the convincing voice of Kira, the heroine, a 14 year-old violinist – a child prodigy. Kira’s voice is loud and clear. While I read I almost saw, smelt, heard, tasted and touched everything she did, as well as experiencing her fear that increases bit by bit and culminates in a shocking incident, At her father’s burial, Kira sees Katie McDonough, a mysterious fiddler for the first time. Later, she sees the red-haired woman from the cemetery “who walks with long strides, her wet strands clinging to her clothes, her leather boots muddied. Had she walked all the way from the graveyard in the storm? When she pauses and looks at me it is as though she knows me. For a moment, I think I know her too. My gaze looks for a few minutes with the iciest blue eyes I have ever seen, eyes almost inhuman…” Kira’s father promised to buy her a very expensive violin before her ARVT – the certificate from The Royal Conservatory in Toronto that says she is as good as anyone who has done 2 years of university, but her mother can’t afford to buy it. Grief-stricken after his death, Kira no longer plays music. When Katie plays the fiddle at the pub owned by Kira’s Uncle Jack, at first Kira is enchanted then afraid. At school she sees a poster with a picture of Katie, that advertises lessons in celtic fiddling and dancing that may be learned singly or in groups. Soon, everyone in the whole town, except for Kira, including her mother and young brother, talk about Celtic. Kira hears ‘conversations, in the supermarket, at the public library and the DVD station. The only theme I disliked was that of Travis, a disturbed youth, who bullies and provokes Chrlotte and Kira. In my opinion, the authorities are too lenient with him. De Montigny is to be congratulated on writing a carefully crafted novel, with satisfying conclusions, which will appeal to young adults and adults.
  • Bright Angels Descending on Oct. 24, 2017

    Bright Angels Descending held my interest from the first page to the last. In this fascinating novel about two Italian sisters and a brother Dr Perna has created a believable story in which bright angels with attitude and personality descend. ‘Who,’ Guilana’s best friend asks, ‘is Mr Tall, Tanned and Tasty?’ Unknown to Guilana, who has experienced much in a short time and reached a critical point in her life, the stranger in town is Michael, a messenger who tells her she is his assignment and that she will be offered a job. She doesn’t believe him but after an interview at the International Antiterrorism Agency with the director, Giacomo Carlo Leoni, the charismatic, handsome thirty-six-year old son of an Italian duke and an American mother, he offers her a job. In this well-written novel, Perna uses her knowledge as a military analyst specialising in strategic communications to enhance the plots in Bright Angels Descending. She also employs her American/Italian heritage to add depth to the novel I enjoyed her descriptions which bring the characters to life, e.g. ‘For an instant so brief Guilana thought she had imagined it, the image of the successful business executive wavered and a man with a sleek powerful build of a warrior, his face illuminated by the light reflecting off a gold, muscled cuirass, stood in its place. The Angel whose name meant ‘who is like God’ gazed down at her, his eyes filled with tenderness.” Dr Perna’s description of the Archangel Michael’s compassion and tenderness set shivers up and down my spine. There are many twists and turns in this novel which swept me into realms in which I didn’t need to suspend my belief in the possibility of their existence. Bright Angels Descending held my interest from the first page to the last. In this fascinating novel about two Italian sisters and a brother Dr Perna has created a believable story in which bright angels with attitude and personality descend.
  • Landmark Roses: Canadian Historical Brides on Oct. 24, 2017

    BooksWeLove Inc dedicated this series to the immigrants male and female, who left their homes and families, crossed oceans and endured unimaginable hardships to settle in the Canadian wilderness and build new lives in a rough and untamed county. Landmark Roses, named for the roses prevalent in the area, begins in autumn 1946 in Silberfeld, Manitoba where a community of Mennonites live. Before I read this novel, I knew little about Mennonites, some of whom fled from Germany to Russian and then emigrated to Canada. German Grandparents Elsie and Ike experienced hard times, particularly when they went to Paraguay where farms had to be hacked out of inhospitable land, mosquitos plagued them, three of their babies died and one of their daughters suffers from recurrent malaria. Despite the ups and downs of their lives the couple remain hard-working and cheerful with firm belief in their faith. Ike and his sons are farmers, Elsie and her daughters and daughter-in-law are busy housewives. They cook meals, make their own bread, butter, cheese and jam as well as growing vegetables and participating in other tasks on the farms. I particularly enjoyed he author’s excellent word pictures, e.g. ‘God seemed all around her in the golden morning sunlight streaming across the land, the heady scent of roses blooming by the side of the road and later the sweet heavenly perfume of large clumps of milkweed where butterflies and bees flitted to and fro going about their business.’ The novel ends in 1918. In a brief span of time the author shows the joys shared by a large family, its sorrows and hardships such as the blizzard in 1947 which had a disastrous consequence. However, Elsie and Ike’s Christian faith and principles upholds them from the beginning to the end of this novel. Landmark Roses provides an interesting glimpse into the past.
  • I'll Be Seeing You on Feb. 06, 2018

    Review by Rosemary Morris This novel by talented novelist, Ms Charbonneau swept me back in time to when America joined in the Second World War. Two young Navajo shepherds, Luke Kayenta and Nantai, his clan brother, from the Indian reservation in Arizona, are engaged by the Office of Strategic Services. Their task is to create a code based on the Navajo language. One which will defeat the enemy whose business is to crack codes. Regardless of danger Luke and Nantai pose as shepherds between the mountains of Spain and France, which is occupied by the Nazis. Ms Charbonneau’s fast-paced novel reveals heroism, romance and tragedy. Until I read this novel, I knew nothing about Navajo culture and customs such as, the celebration which honours a baby’s first smile.
  • Fly Away Snow Goose: Canadian Historical Brides on Feb. 06, 2018

    In the first part of Fly Away Snow Goose the reader enters the traditional way of life pursued by First Nations people. The Thcho band is one of different bands of people who inhabit the Canadian North West. Their lands “lie east of the Mackenzie River between Great Slave Lake and Great Bear Lake”. The Thcho respect for the land is summed up by Rosalie Tailbones. “It’s the land that keeps things for us. Being our home it’s important for us to take good care of the dwelling, the land, for wherever you go is home.” At the beginning of this historical novel, Yaot’l and Sascho are innocent teenagers who enjoy each other’s company. Intelligent, brave-hearted Yaot’l, whose name means Warrior, lives with her parents and extended family. Decisive, Sascho a born leader, an orphan, reveres his Uncle John, who teaches him: “It is important to remember the elders for they are still here, lying in the land that had borne them.” While Sascho is honouring the dead, who died of the white man’s sickness an old man warns him to beware of the white men. “They will cross your pathway and take you to a place where your spirit will be forbidden.” Neither Sascho nor Yaot’l know that the Canadian Government has passed a law which decrees all Thcho children must leave their families to be educated. In the second part of this well-researched historical fiction, they are captured by an Indian agent and taken to Fort Providence Residential School where the teachers intend to “kill the Indian inside their pupils.” Abused and half-starved, Sascho is determined to take Yaot’l home. From the moment they made their escape I wanted them to cross the rivers and make their way through unknown territory. I dreaded either the Indian agent or a Canadian Mountie capturing them and returning them to school. I crossed my fingers hoping their courage would not end in tragedy. Their people’s way of life is changing. In spring fewer men in the Snow Goose Band made the trek to the fishing grounds. “Some no longer looked to the land for their living but to the white man’s jobs.” This is not the life Yaot’l and Sascho want. They hope to marry and follow their ancestor’s way of life free of interference. Fly Away Snow Goose is one of the best historical novels I have read in 2017. I travelled with the young lovers, shared their joy and sadness, their triumphs and failures, stumbled on paths with them and rejoiced when they continued. At times, I needed a handkerchief to wipe my tears away. The authors, Juliet Waldron and John Wisdomkeeper, are to be congratulated on showing me the Snow Geese’s traditional way of life and sharing their legends. They are to be praised for the quality of their writing. The sun high and bright warmed her black hair. The ache in her shoulders diminished. A little breeze blew as she walked along, inviting tendrils that had escaped from her braids. The creek sparkled and danced nearby, whispering over a bottom of rock. Carried on the breeze were bird calls – the bright sounds of courtship. The birds were singing to set territories, calling from scrub and bush that marked their home range. “Yaot’l held her arms above her head, allowing the warmth from Father Sun to seep into her hands and down her arms. It was one of those blessing moments, when the light flowed through her body and joined with her spirit making all one.” Review by Rosemary Morris
  • Hand Me Down Bride on March 02, 2018

    What does the future hold for Carrie? She is not sure whether Tony, her ‘childhood protector’, ‘teenage ego booster’, the one person who always listened to her, will help her. Years ago, Tony’s wife, Marilyn spread false accusations about Carrie, a nurse, in the hospital cafeteria. Embarrassed and angry Carrie walked away from Tony, her best friend. Since then, Marilyn has left Tony and their son Chad, who reacted by behaving badly. Tony has never forgotten, Carrie, his first love. When she asks him to marry her to fulfil the terms of her grandfather’s will, although he has reservations he agrees to help her. However, with a rebellious child to deal with and an uncertain relationship they have much to resolve. Ms Lane-Walters has written a romantic novel about a marriage of convenience with many twists and turns that held my interest from beginning to end. A Marriage Takes Two contains explicit sex. Review by Rosemary Morris www.rosemarymorris,co,uk
  • Song of Memories on June 30, 2018

    From the first page to the last I really enjoyed talented Ms Grieve’s novel Song of Memories. The story begins in Moscow when ‘icy wind threw pebbles of rain against the ill-fitting windows…later in the month snow would come, freezing to thick bands of ice which would seal the windows. For the rest of her life, orphan Natalie Fisher would remember how cosy she felt ‘secure beside the comforting warmth of the round pot-bellied stove.’ Natalie lives with Olga, her mother’s cousin, Olga’s husband Andrei and their son Stephen, a talented musician. While Olga plays the piano and the others clap their hands, Natalie is waiting to tell them she and Stephen must marry because she is pregnant. Heavy footsteps sound on the stairs. This time Stalin’s police have not come to arrest them. A few days later, on her way home from work, Natalie ‘crossed the marble-floored concourse taking in the beauty of the newly opened Metro – the brightly painted frescos, the glittering chandeliers.’ The apartment has been ransacked. Stephen’s violin has been smashed. Natalie flees to the British Embassy where she meets and official, Lawrence Sinclair, who she marries for the sake of her baby. Denounced by workmates as British spies Olga and Andrei have been shot and Stephen has been arrested and delivered to the infamous Lubyanka prison. In England with Lawrence Natalie is tortured by the question is Stephen alive or is he dead? Song of Memories with its many twists and turns in the plot held my attention from beginning to end. I look forward to reading more of Ms. Grieve’s novels.
  • Envy the Wind on Aug. 04, 2018

    Canadian Brides. Book Eleven. BooksWeLove Inc dedicated this series to the immigrants male and female, who left their homes and families, crossed oceans and endured unimaginable hardships to settle in the Canadian wilderness and build new lives in a rough and untamed county. When I begin a novel by Ms Davison I know I will enjoy it. Envy the Wind fulfilled all my expectations of a story rich in historical details with major and minor characters that sprang to life and remained with me after I read the last page. According to the terms of the will made by Grace MacKinnon’s father she becomes a ward of his business partner Angus, who always ‘impressed on her the expense of her upkeep was his personal burden.’ Married to his son, Frederick, when she was seventeen, after Frederick’s death she became Angus’s unpaid housekeeper. Grace is shocked when she finds a letter from her late father’s solicitor among her deceased husband, possessions. At the age of 23 she should have been granted control of her inheritance, but Angus had never discussed it with her. Grace escapes the unscrupulous Angus and sails to Nova Scotia, but her father-in-law does not release his hold on her easily. The ship encounters a near disaster in Halifax Harbour when Grace meets Andrew Jardine. He is on his way back to Prince Edward Island and invites Grace to travel with him on a friend’s steamer to the island where Angus’s agent will never find her. I enjoyed Ms Davison’s word picture of Grace’s first impression of New Brunswick. ‘Behind the harbour was a tree-lined street unlike any Grace had seen before. The majority of the houses had boarded facades as opposed to brick or stone, most with bay windows, covered verandas and porches, all freshly painted in pastel colours like a child’s toy village just out of the box.’ And, on the way to Charlottesville the steamer glided ‘through the strait along a shore of rose and golden sand that sparkled in the sunshine. Coves and small bays wound in and out, beyond which lay a patchwork of lush rolling fields, tiny gabled farmhouses and seaside villages scattered along the shore. While reading historical fiction, I always appreciate it when the author slips facts into the story as skilfully as Ms Davison. For example: ‘Here, is your first history lesson,’ Mr Jardine says to Grace. ‘In the mid 1700’s Charles Lawrence and John Gosham clashed with Louis Loutre who led the M’ikmaq tribe and the Acadia against the British.” Jealousy, an attempt to incriminate Grace in illegal activity, her friendship with L.M. Montgomery author of Anne of Green Gables, sabotage and romance are woven into Envy the Wind, which enthralled me from beginning to end. I look forward to reading Ms Davison’s next novel. Rosemary Morris
  • The Proposition on Aug. 04, 2018

    When once you once you practice to deceive, what a tangled web you weave is applicable to Ms Selbourne's novel, which begins in France 1918. While Harry Connelly lit a cigarette, a Canadian division was marching towards Ypres. Tomorrow, at dawn a co-ordinated attack would be launched on the Germans, tanks, infantry, artillery, cavalry and the newly-formed Royal Air force. Everyone, including Harry and his friend Andrew Conway, are scared. Neither Harry nor Andrew know who their fathers were. Harry’s mum “didn’t have it easy She had to live on charity for a while and put up with back-handed comments about women on their own.” Andrew’s mother pretended she was a widow. At the front an eruption of scorching earth reared up and threw them to the ground. The wound in Harry’s leg will cripple him. Andrew is dead. To escape his past Harry joined the army, now he steals Andrew’s identity disc. If he goes through with his plan he will risk being hanged. In London in 1919 Harry, receives a pension from the military after he receives his Protection Certificate and Certificate of Identity in the name of Andrew Haines Conway born 1892. When Andrew died, he didn’t know he had a half-brother, Elliot Haines. A letter addressed to Andrew arrives. Andrew and Elliot’s father is dead, When Eliot meets Harry he offers him a shocking proposition that Harry refuses. Murder and mayhem, incriminating missing letters, romance, an abduction, a traumatised orphan, attempts on Harry’s life and on that of the woman he protects ensue. The Proposition held my attention from the first page to the last when the plot unravelled. I congratulate Ms Selbourne on writing this enthralling novel with believable larger than life characters. Rosemary Morris
  • Powerful Destiny on Aug. 06, 2018

    I enjoy novels with the theme reincarnation, so I chose to read McGill’s novel Powerful Destiny, which gripped me from the first page to the last. Part One takes place in Britain circa 850. A.D. when Rolf, a jarl, and his companions raid East Anglia. They defeat the Celts and search for their women. Rolf’s men ‘looked at him – the light of eagerness clear on their grim, blood-spattered faces.’ A child ran towards them. Rolf ordered his men not to kill him…it sickened him to see a female or a child killed for any reason. Brigid, a Celtic princess, comes out of a cave and challenges him in Norse. ‘In all his travels Rolf has never seen such a vision of loveliness. He caught his breath, the Celtic female was only fit to become a slave but, perhaps he could capture her heart.’ He promised neither she nor the womenfolk would be harmed if they come out of their hiding place. She capitulates and realises Rolf is not ‘a savage, bloodthirsty animal which rumour claimed’. From the moment Rolf sets eyes on Brigid he knows she is his destiny. A destiny which does not end in their present lives but continues in the 21st century in Cornwall. “From the top of the lighthouse keeper, Rolf stared at the raging sea “as it beat relentlessly against the rocks, spray rose high in the air.” As a former member of the Merchant Navy, “the sea held no fear for him. In fact, he’d always loved it and the raw beauty that surrounded his unusual home.” In a bookshop he sees a woman whose head is bent over a book. “Long black hair obscured her face. Even though he felt sure he didn’t know her there seemed to be something familiar about her.” Rolf and the woman, whose name is Brigid, reach for a book about Vikings. A small white hand touched Rolf’s. He jumped as though he had received an electric shock. I congratulate Ms McGill on her creation of a powerful romance that, despite all the setbacks in a Viking settlement in which an attempt is made to murder Brigid and her reconnection with Rolf in Cornwall. I look forward to reading more of this talented author’s novels.
  • The Defiant Lady Pencavel on Aug. 22, 2018

    The Defiant Lady Pencaval is a satirical eighteenth-century farce with a cast of larger than life characters.Betrothed while a baby to thirty-two year old Lord Lambrick when he was at Eton twenty year old Melwyn Pencaval hopes that if. she agrees to marry him, he will die early and leave her a rich widow.Talented Ms Scott-Lewis sprinkles the novel with well-written word pictures: “…breathes in the brisk air, the welcome scents of boxwood and lavender. The March spring blooms were starting, peeling off the greyness of winter. Lady Pencaval loved her home, yet more often of late it seemed a prison…” Outspoken, unconventional Melwyn doesn’t want to marry. She asks her father why she should care what a herd of stale biddies think of her because she won’t conform to society’s dictates.Griffin Landrick, Viscount of Werther, son of stuffy, traditionalist, unimaginative parents believes females should be kept firmly in their place otherwise they tended to spiral out of control. The only things Melwyn and Griffin have in common is their mutual antipathy and interest in antiquities.This ‘tongue in the cheek’ novel will amuse you from beginning to end. Review by Rosemary Morris
  • The Revenge (Shadow of the Unicorn 3) on Sep. 16, 2018

    Damien, a uninicorn foal, has a happy childhood with his parents until he is introduced to the herd which, in spite of his remarkable abilities, rejects him because of his unusual appearance.“If they had only been kinder – even just a little, he thinks. He clenched his teeth, the crease in his forehead deepening. A tear trickled down his cheek, burning like the sting of a bee.” In a nearby village, lives Corabelle, a young girl who can communicate with birds and animals. For this ability she is accused of being a witch. Damien and Corabelle are victims of unjustifiable prejudice and, if unicorns did not fear humans, maybe they could help each other. I enjoyed this imaginative, well-written children’s novel, which is as interesting as the first two in the series. Rosemary Morris
  • The Revenge (Shadow of the Unicorn 3) on Sep. 16, 2018

    Damien, a uninicorn foal, has a happy childhood with his parents until he is introduced to the herd which, in spite of his remarkable abilities, rejects him because of his unusual appearance.“If they had only been kinder – even just a little, he thinks. He clenched his teeth, the crease in his forehead deepening. A tear trickled down his cheek, burning like the sting of a bee.” In a nearby village, lives Corabelle, a young girl who can communicate with birds and animals. For this ability she is accused of being a witch. Damien and Corabelle are victims of unjustifiable prejudice and, if unicorns did not fear humans, maybe they could help each other. I enjoyed this imaginative, well-written children’s novel, which is as interesting as the first two in the series. Rosemary Morris
  • Healwoman on Sep. 16, 2018

    I enjoy well-written fantasy fiction. Ms Lane Walters’ novel Healwoman is a delight. It is one of the best ones I have read for some time. It contains ingredients necessary for this genre, quests and magic. This talented author has created a believable world on the brink of disaster, full of tension, conflict, love and lust, goodness and romance. Healwoman is a page turner which I stayed up to read too late at night. I look forward to reading more of Ms Lane Walter’s novels. Rosemary Morris
  • Healwoman on Sep. 16, 2018

    I enjoy well-written fantasy fiction. Ms Lane Walters’ novel Healwoman is a delight. It is one of the best ones I have read for some time. It contains ingredients necessary for this genre, quests and magic. This talented author has created a believable world on the brink of disaster, full of tension, conflict, love and lust, goodness and romance. Healwoman is a page turner which I stayed up to read too late at night. I look forward to reading more of Ms Lane Walter’s novels. Rosemary Morris
  • The Aries Libra Connection on Oct. 31, 2018

    Jenessa, an Aries, is a busy nurse at in the Intensive Care Unit at an understaffed hospital. Eric Bradshaw, a Libran, is appointed as the new Director of Nursing at Eastlake Community Hospital where the staff are underpaid.. Her flatmate says their star signs are compatible, but Jenessa is the union representative and Eric is in management, so Jenessa is certain she won’t ‘fall for the opposition’. Eric’s friend had told Eric: “Something fishy’s going on. I’m not sure who, what or why, You’ve got the training to dig out the information.” While Jenessa and Eric discover what is going on at the hospital, they are attracted to each other. Fans of hospital romances will enjoy this novel in which Ms Walters applies her knowledge of the ins and outs of hospitals. Review by Rosemary Morris