Phillip Benages

Books

This member has not published any books.

Smashwords book reviews by Phillip Benages

  • We, The Watched on Nov. 01, 2011

    We the Watched is an intriguing thought experiment into the application of an extremist approach to domestic monitoring of citizens on a modern day era. Though no specific country names or religions are mentioned, it is very simple to draw the connection between already existing situations such as The Patriot Act, and religious law in the Middle East. The narrative begins with a somewhat jarring entry into the mind of the protagonist, an amnesic mind, desperate for answers, every bit as confused and erratic as one might expect. With every deduction and distraction, the reader is pulled into the mind themselves. It is somewhat of a brute force tactic, but in the end it results in a deep connection with the character drawing extremely visceral responses from the reader to the events that unfold as the story progresses. Bender does a good job of lyrically painting the landscape. Even when the environments themselves are supposed to be somewhat industrial and plain, the reader is able to visualize vivid mental pictures, complete with imagery of the citizens of this dystopian society and tinges of the white noise that are indicative of the dark secrets it hides. Ultimately, We the Watched is definitely worth the read. There is room for expansion and elaboration of the world, but doing so would have been wholly unnecessary for the narrative portrayed. It is a fantastic debut for Bender, and I look forward to seeing what else he comes up with.
  • We, The Watched on Nov. 01, 2011

    We the Watched is an intriguing thought experiment into the application of an extremist approach to domestic monitoring of citizens on a modern day era. Though no specific country names or religions are mentioned, it is very simple to draw the connection between already existing situations such as The Patriot Act, and religious law in the Middle East. The narrative begins with a somewhat jarring entry into the mind of the protagonist, an amnesic mind, desperate for answers, every bit as confused and erratic as one might expect. With every deduction and distraction, the reader is pulled into the mind themselves. It is somewhat of a brute force tactic, but in the end it results in a deep connection with the character drawing extremely visceral responses from the reader to the events that unfold as the story progresses. Bender does a good job of lyrically painting the landscape. Even when the environments themselves are supposed to be somewhat industrial and plain, the reader is able to visualize vivid mental pictures, complete with imagery of the citizens of this dystopian society and tinges of the white noise that are indicative of the dark secrets it hides. Ultimately, We the Watched is definitely worth the read. There is room for expansion and elaboration of the world, but doing so would have been wholly unnecessary for the narrative portrayed. It is a fantastic debut for Bender, and I look forward to seeing what else he comes up with.